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NORTHERN EXPOSURE 
YMCA camp in tiPie sticks 
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VA hospital may close 

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Six Sections — 80 Pages 

Hockney vows 

AH 





open on time 




By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 

School wilJ begin on time for 
Antioch Community High School 
(ACHS) students, teachers and staff. 

That Is the word from Dr. Dennis 
Hockney, ACHS District 117 superin- 
tendent 

Hockney squashed rumors 
stemming from comments by trades 
people working on the project to' 
school personnel that the building 
wouldnot be ready to open on time. 

'We have about two weeks to 
complete the necessary work," 
Hockney said. "We will be able to 
open on time." 

Gino Ricchlo of Seater Construc- 
tion Company, project manager, has 
assured Hockney work expected to 
be completed will be done. Faculty is 
expected on Monday, Aug. 23, with 
students first day Wednesday, Aug. 

During an exclusive update tour 
for Lakeland Newspapers, Hockney . 
showed how much of the work is 
already completed. 

"We've been able to Improve the 
buUding' and' make the community ' 
proud," Hockney said, The project 



will result in an additional 60,000 
square feet of space under roof. 

"We're proud to have been able 
to do this project without any 
increase in. taxes," Hockney 
.explained The certificate of partici- 
pation (CQPJ's program has enabled 
the district to use funds out of the 
regular operating budget 

A $5,6 million state construction 
grant enabled additional unplanned 
work to be .'included within the 
project's scope. 

"All under-floor and In-ceiling 
work has been completed," Hockney 
explained. "Overall, we've had good 
weather with the exception of the one 
extremely hot week. There are two 
shifts Working dally." 

"I really have to compliment our 
people," Hockney stated regarding 
the regular school staff. "It's really a 
compliment to our people who have 
continued to function within the 
building along with the construction ■ 
.personnel," 

During the tour, senior pictures 
were progressing as planned within 
the school commons area, which, 
resembled a war zone with construc- 

Please see ACHS IA4 



Lindeiihurst partial ban 
key to burning issue? 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 

Movement toward a ban on leaf 
burning, in the western part of Lake 
County is not gaining much steam. 

Residents in the Antioch 'area 
and Fox Lake area both voiced their 
opposition to a complete ban during . 
meetings with county board repre- 
sentatives. 

Antioch Township Supervisor 
Steve Smouse sees "99.9 percent of 
the people supporting being able to 

burn;" 

"There's so many large" pieces of 
property which have a lot of trees on 
them," Smouse explained. "It would 
be very costly to mulch or not bum." 

One area in the township has 
over 250-300 oak trees on a five-acre 
site, according to Smouse. "Oak trees 
don't mulch." 

Smouse does not see how county 
board members could support a 
complete county-wide ban on 
burning. 

Lindenhurst Trustee Carl Norlin 



noted his village has taken a lead In 
trying to come up with a compro- 
mise. 

A partial restriction, with burning 

allowed on Wednesdays during 

designated times of the year, has 

; been instituted by the Lindenhurst 

board for the past several years. 

"It came across loud.and clear at : 
. the hearings that people are dead set 
against a ban. on burning," Norlin 
said. "They have expressed a willing- 
ness to compromise." 

M It speaks well for our village that 
we had the foresight quite a few years 
ago to. limit it," Norlin added. "I'm 
pleased we instituted burning days 
years ago. We're much further ahead 
of some communities which have 
not addressed it at all." 

"On any issue, there'll be pros 
and cons," Lindenhurst Mayor Paul 
Baumunk said. "If you go to the 
eastern part of the county, where it's 
more residential, I'm sure there's a 
majority wanting a ban. Each 
community may have to use their 
own best judgment" 



AGHS hires 3 new teachers 



" Three new teachers and several 
extracurricular positions were filled by 
the Antioch Community High School 
District 117 Board of Education. 

Stuart Church will be a math 
teacher. Stacy Selle a, .long-term 
substitute. Ingelore Meredith a long- 
term substitute German teacher. 

Ronald^Amster will be the head 
girls' track coach. Lisa Marschinski 



assistant softball coach. Carolyn 
Stanley assistant boys' tennis coach. 
Math team sponsors will be Tom 
Kessell and Carolyn Stanley. Stuart 
Church will be environmental club 

sponsor. 

The board unanimously 
approved the personnel moves for 
the 1999-2000 /school year.— By 
MicliaelH.Babicz 




By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 




- -^HST_W : 19,_1999_ _ __ .*^landHewpaw/7s^ 

|ai|p 

attended with quite a few people 
coming through all day long," said 
Kathy LaBuda, head librarian. 
"Throughout the week, we had the 
new books and materials out for 
people to look at" 

The extravaganza marked the 
beginning of the new materials avail- 
able to the public. 

"We appreciate very much the 



The Antioch library has "lots of 
new stuff" available to the community. 

Debuted through the library's 
extravaganza the first week in August, 
the library has lots of new Items avail- 
able Including a wide range of books. 

"The open house was well . 



support of the public In our last refer- 
endum," LaBuda explained. "We 
have purchased these materials In 
response to their mandate." 

"We're going to keep puttingnew 
stickers on new books all year," 
LaBuda said.. "We haveMots of 
wonderful new things for people to 
see and use. We encourage them to 
stop by." 




ling for everyone 

Holding onto a recently-purchased pie from the Antioch Women's 
Club bake sale, Gall Fields (center) catches up with Nancy 
Rentner (left) and Diana Engquist all of Antioch. The three 
gathered at the Antioch Lion's Barbecue and Antioch Fire and 
Rescue Squad Auction at Williams Park Sunday. At right, Antioch 
Fire and Rescue Squad member Tom Charmak holds up a sign to 
start bids on a. pig at the auction.— Photo by Lynn Gunnarson 
Dahlstrom 




Weather, attendance aid auction success 



By. MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Great weather. Great food. Great 
fellowship. 

All were present in the annual 
Antioch lion's Club Trainer's Chick- 
en Barbecue Dinner/Antioch Rescue 
Squad Auction at Williams Park. 

The smell of cooking chickens 
and roasting com permeated the air, 
with the barks of the auctioneer 
interspersed by applause of a grateful 

public. 

"Everything went well," said 
Steve Smouse, Antioch Rescue Squad 
president "The community came 
forward and supported the events 
like they always do." 



No exact figures are available 
from either, the Lions or the rescue 
squad, as both are continuing to 
count' donations and take care of 
expenses. Representatives from both 
agreed the day was a success. 

"Finally, mother nature cooper- 
ated and gave us great weather," said 
Chuck Cermak of the Lions;- ?With 
the turnout we had and the dinners 
we served, we'll be able to have more 
money to put into various communi- 
ty activities." 

. "Everybody enjoyed themselves, 
and that's all we can ask for," Cermak 

added, t" 

Smouse extended a special 
thanks to the Claude Smith family of 
Nu-Way Speakers in Antioch for a 



generous contribution of $10,000 to 
the rescue squad. Smouse noted this 
marks the fifth consecutive year of 
the donation. 

Retired rescue squad member 
Everett Oftedahl donated all of his 
antique farm equipment for auction. 
H I think his wife finally made him 
clean out' the garage of all of "the 
things he bought at the auction over 
the years," quipped Smouse. 

\ Overall, Smouse anticipates the 
final, tally will show a better year 
income-wise this year than last 

"It was a very successful event/' 

Smouse 'added, relating a Crystal 

• Lake couple came while just driving 

past the park and. seeing something 

was happening. 



a ■ 



A2 /Lakeland Newspapers 

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August 13, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A3 



Schools announce lunch 
program requirements 



The qualifications for free and 
reduced-price meals for students in 
Antloch Community High School 
District 117 and Grade School Dis- 
trict 34, along with Lake VUla District 
41, for the 1999-2000 school year 
have been announced. All public 1 
school districts in Illinois use the 
same requirements. 

The policy is for those students 
unable to pay full price for meals. 

For one person households: 
$10,712 annual income, $893 per 
month or $206 per week qualifies for 
free meals. Additional requirements 
for free meals are: 2 persons- 
$14,378/$l,199/$277j 3 persons- 
$18,044/$l,504/$347; 4 persons- 
$21,710/$1,810/$418; 5 persons- 
$25,376/$2,115/$488; 6 persons- 
$29,042/$2,421/$559; 7 persons- 
$32,708/$2;726/$629; 8 persons- 



$36,374/$3,032/|700; for each addi- 
tional member acid $3,666 per year, 
$306 per month or $71 per week- 
Reduced price lunch qualifiers 
are: one person 

$15,244/$l,271/$294; 2 persoris- 
$20,461 /$l,706/$394j 3 persons- 
$25,678/$2,140/$494; 4 persons- 
$30,895/$2,575/$595; 5 persons- 
$36,112/$3,010/$695; 6 persons- 
$41,329/$3;445/$795; 7 persons- 
$46,546/$3,879/$896; 8' persons- 
$5l",763J r $4^14/$996; foteach add!-' 
tlbnal family member add $5,217 peri 
year, $435 per month or $101 per 
week. 

Applications an additional 
guideline requirements are available 
by contacting the school district of- 
fice 838-8401, or stop at the office, 
800 Main Street, Antioch.— By 
Michael H. Babicz 





\ 



New-pipes for hidden ones re- 
ceived approval from the Antioch 
Community High School (ACHS) 
District 117 Board of Education. 

In board activity following an 
hour-long tour of the work being 
done as of August 5 board meeting, 
the board awarded a $55,400 con- 
tract to Diemer Plumbing of Antioch. 

The pipe work In the girl's locker 
room and the former art rooms is 
necessary, and unexpected. The 
damaged pipes did not appear on 
any plans and were destroyed during 



demolition work, according to Dr. 
Dennis Hockney, ACHS superinten- 
dent. 

In another project change, reno- 
vation of the old guidance area was 
approved at a cost of $42,000. The 
old section will be used until the 
newer section Is completed. 

Hockney updated the board that 
school Is expected to start on time, 
with teachers reporting Monday, Au- 
gust 23, while first day for students Is 
Wednesday, August 25.— By Michael 
H. Babicz 



ACHS goes for tech grant 



Preparirigfor the new ihiUenium 
may receive a major boost in the case 
of Antioch Community High School. 

The District 117 Board of Educa- 
tion approved to apply for a state 
matching grant of $95,000. 

*The funds, , coming out of the 
State of Illinois' Technical Interven- 
tion Program Grant, would be used 
for staff training and replacement of 



.equipment. 
'" 'School , representatives will- 
make a presentation to the State of 
Illinois Board of Education later 
this month. 

If Antioch is approved, the 
school board would put up $95,000 
with the state matching It, Dr. Den- 
nis Hockney, District 117 superin- 
tendent, said.— Sy Michael H. Babicz 




Animals on parade 

Michelle Stevens and Jessie the puppet greet their guests for the 
Murphy's Paw Puppets show. Stevens and her animal friends were 
at theiAntioch Community Ubrary to perform for local young- 
, sters.-1-Pnoto by Derek Nosal 




Ready for action 

Above left, Efraln Ollveras, 4 r of Antioch gets In the driver's seat of a race car, on loan from Wilmot 
Speedway in Wilmot, Wis., during the Christian Life Fellowship Church Youth/Health Fair in Antioch 
Saturday. Above right, dozens of children bounced and hopped through the space walk at the fair.— 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 




By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Some residents of Antioch 
Township may be eligible for energy 
assistance in paying unexpected bills 
resulting from the summer's heat 
wave. 

Antioch Township Supervisor 
Steve Smouse received word from 
the Lake County Community Action 
Project office of the availability of 
federal funds. 



I ' ■ - 1 1 : r 



Eligible seniors and low income 
families may apply/ for- a one time 
$250 grant toward utility expenses 
stemming from the long period of 
high temperatures and humidity ex- 
perienced during July. 

Seniors who previously qualified 
for winter season energy assistance 
are prequalified, according to 
Smouse. 

In some cases, air conditioning 
units may be available depending 
upon Individual circumstances, 



Smouse explained. 

Winter assistance applications 
will be available beginning in Sep- 
tember at the township office. 

- Persons with questions regard- 
ing the grant program may phone 
the community action project of- 
fice 249-4330. Regarding other 
programs or possible assistance, 
contact the township office 395- 
3378. 

"We are here to help,* Smouse 
concluded. -,'■ 



Antioch ftill of all types of winners 



Gongratuktions Rick and 
FrledlKnetaiiofLakeVil- 
la bn the birth of another 
grandson, Lucas Martin, 
bom to Kuehn's son , Hans, and his 
wife, Heidi. I understand another 
grandchild Is expected very soon. > 

Antioch Rotary Club will wel- 
come new teachers to Antioch area 
schools at noon on Thursday, Au- 
gust 19, at The Colony House on, 
Rock Lake Road. 

Speaking of Rotary, the club is.' v 
In need of auction Items for their 
October 2 annual event Anyone 
who has a Item to donate is asked to 
contact a Rotary member or stop in 
at the weekly meeting, 12:15 p.m., 
at Columbia Bay on Route 59. The 
one exception to the meetings be- 
ing there is the August 19 new 
teacher luncheon. 

What a great day for the Lion's 
Club Farmer's Chicken Dinner and 
the Antioch Rescue Squad Auction. 
The weather was beautiful, the 
companionship great. 

I took my mother, Alice Babicz 
of North Chicago, and girlfriend 
Cathy Landgren of Camp Lake, Wis. 
We had a most enjoyable afternoon 
and lots of great things to eat 

It was nice seeing my prede- 
cessor with Antioch News, Ken 
Patchen, who just can't keep away 
from his former community. Ken is 
doing well, but admits to missing 
many of his old friends. One never 
knows, maybe someday Ken will re- 




ltHtiil,«lll, ».., ,„ , 

OUR 
TOWN 

MichoelH. Babicz 



various dramas relating to bible 
messages. , r 

Group memoers include Tim 
Ricer, Carolyn Smith and Alex 
Smith, all of Uridenhurst; twin sls- 
ters Kris and Karen Innla of Fox 
Lake, Ton! Flores and lennl Wit- 



turn just as this writer has done. 
7). Speaking of the rescue squad, 
make sure to mark Saturday, Au- 
gust 21 on your calendar for the 2nd 
Annual Wilmot Wing Ding race car 
show and family fun day at Cap t 
dirt's Pub & Grill on Channel Lake. 
Proceeds from the event will be do- 
nated to the rescue squad. 

The Christian Life Fellowship 
Youth/Child Health Fair got off to a 
soggy start, but hone the less was a 
most enjoyable day. 

I attended on behalf of Wilmot 
Speedway along with Jay Sachs of 
Waukegan, one of the sprint car dri- 
vers who brought his winged ma- 
chine. Many youngsters and adults 
took lay up on the chance to sit in- 
side his race car, with many photos 
taken. 

Pastor Jeff Brussaly and his 
staff of volunteers did some adjust- 
ing of activity schedules, but every- 
thing worked out 

The fair gave melhe opportu- 
nity to meet an outstand group of 
young people, the Truth Warriors. 
They are a interdenominational 
group of friends which performs 



G raw of Spring Grove and "Mama" 

Janice Poehler. 

Special thanks to the Smiths 

who were Jdnd enough to let me 

"babysit" 4 -m oh th old John* than ' 
much of the afternoon. He's a great 
little baby. 

In a bit of confusion over the 
many beauty pageants, Antioch 
News recognizes the first little Miss 
Antioch having been Mary Cash- 
more in 1996. 

Congratulations to 1999 Litde 
Miss Lake County Anna Wend- 
strom, who earned her spot in the 
county pageant with top honors in ; 
the Antioch pageant 

Brand! Enright of Antioch was 
the first everJuniorMiss having tak- 
en that crown in the 1999 At Large 
Pageant due to Antioch's not having 
a junior miss division in its pageant" 
The other Antioch royalty this 
year us 1999 Miss Antioch Jenn 
Kemer. 

If you haveinterestinginformation 
or anecdotes to submit for "Our 
Town" call staff reporter Mike 
Babicz at 223-8161, ext more- 
mail, edit @lndcom. " 



i 



Antioch News 

Vol. 114 No. 33 A Lakeland Newspaper ^.Founded 1886 

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WILLIAM H.SCHR0EDER 

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1 BOBULMER 

Display Advertising Mgr. 



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Public Relations Manager 



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Operations Manager 

MAUREEN COMBS 

CtusHMAfretlislngMQr. 



AutoMartet...Sec. D 

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Real Estate, ..B12 
Travel BIO 



A4 I Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



August 13, 1999 



FROM PAGE Al 



ACHS: Hockney promises school construction will be ready for students' return 




tion materials and plastic coverings 
over stored supplies amidst a small 
desk table set up. At the same time, 
seniors dressed seml-formally walked 
through, heading to the photo area. 

Summer school went on as 
scheduled. The various sports sum- 
mer camps, clinics and tournaments 
were held. 

"Our custodial people, although 
frustrated because it's difficult to de- 
termine where and when to clean, 
have done a fantastic Job," Hockney 
said, walking through a spotless area 
between the two gymnasiums, just off 
the under construction hallway to the 
auditorium. 

"We haven't missed a beat," 
Hockney added. 

In-person registration was held 



August 10 In the new office area. Stu- 
dents and parents were encouraged 
to use a mail-in process to avoid long 
lines and having to come in person. 

The parking lot on the northwest 
corner of the school, outside the new 
two-floor atrium style entrance, was 
expected to be completed for regis- 
tration. 

The registration was the first for- 
mal use of the new entryway. It re- 
placed the old confusion of the for- 
mer entrance into the commons area. 

"When I came here for an inter- 
view, I wasn't sure where the entrance 
to the school was," admitted Hock- 
ney. "This will make things much 
easier." 

Attendance will be located just off 
the main entrance enabling students 




It may not look like much now as work continues on the Antioch 
Community High School, but officials at the school are confident 
on the completion of crucial areas before the facility opens for 
students.— Photo by Derek Nosal 



arriving late to school with getting 
their pass before entering the main 
student population. 

A previously used art room is be- 
ing transformed into a dance/aero- 
bics physical education room with a 
special cushioned floor. An art/dri- 
ver's ed room is becoming a drama 
classroom. 

All drama classes were held in the 
auditorium In past years. With ses- 
sions meeting each hour, this made it 
difficult for the auditorium to be used 
for other functions. It also required 
the drama classes to either be can- 
celed, or moved to another room. 

Plans are to keep the auditorium 
open, although it is being used for 
storage and will not be available at all 
for the first few months of school. 

"Originally, we hadn't planned to 
move the drama classroom and some 
of the other things we're doing," 
Hockney explained. "When we got 
the state money, that has enabled us 
to do more." 

A "dead-end" hallway on the 
north end of the building is being 
structured to allow a student traffic 
pattern around the entire school. 

In the new addition, there are 
three general classrooms. A technol- 
ogy lab including a flight simulator, 
space & rockets, satellite communi- 
cations and video production areas, 
to name a few, is being expanded. 
This program gives students a two- 
week introduction into various occu- 
pations and careers. 

Students are given the opportu- 
nity after completing the introduc- 
tion sessions as freshmen or sopho- 
mores to explore taking courses at the 
Lake CountyTechnical Campus. 

"The whole tech lab was in the 
former metal shop area, and a lot of 
students didn't even know it was 
there," Hockney explained. 

A new wood shop which meets 
all EPA/OSHA requirements and has 
a state of the art dust collecting sys- 
tem. 

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ence area includes a child care room 
with access to enclosed courtyard for 
the 4-year-olds which are watched 
over by students in the class. 

Separate rooms for a clothing lab 
and cook-foods lab have been added, 
The cooking area Includes six 
kitchens, a demonstrator kitchen 
along with a walk-in refrigerator- 
freezer. 

The old foods lab was very 
cramped on the third floor of the torn 
down 1917 building. "Nowlt'samore 
open room which is a great addition," 

There are Uiree new art rooms 
with one exclusively for ceramics. All 
floors are tiled with the exception of 
the ceramics and woodshop rooms. 
Those are being left cement allowing 
for hose-down cleaning when need- 
ed, 

The drawing/painting room on 
the west side of the building has sev- 
eral windows allowing for a lot of nat- 
ural light, Instrumental to artists and 
requested by the art teachers. 

There are shared storage areas 
and two large hallway display cabi- 
nets dedicated to the art department. 

The upstairs portion of the addi- 
tion includes two chemical labs, two 
physics labs and storage areas in-be- 
tween. Prior to the construction, 
there were a total of eight science labs. 
Two were demolished and four have 
been added resulting in an increase of 
two to a total often. 

"The previous labs were built in 
1962," Hockney explained. "This 
brings them up to date." 

Completion of the library expan- 
sion was not planned to be, nor will it 
be completed prior to school open- 
ing. When completed, the library will 
be aboutSO percent larger. 

The resource/multi-media sec- 
tion to the south of the new part of the 
library is expected to be done some- 
time in October. A computer lab with 
25 computers is expected to be avail- 
able to students. 

"We've got all of the furniture in," 
Hockney said, as student summer 
workers separated shelves and un- 
packed boxes. "It's a matter of getting 
the boxes all unpacked." 

"Our plan Is to eventually make 
the library and resource areas avail- 
able to the public in the evenings," 
Hockney said, noting that is at least 
one year further down the road. 

There is elevator access to the 
second floor for the handicapped, 
with the elevator located just inside 
the main school entrance. 

Underneath the library, on the 
first floor, are the main offices. In ad- 
dition to the reception and atten- 
dance areas, a copy/work room, two 
conference rooms, various offices in- 
cluding the principal and deans, 
along with the computer control hub 
are all within the new area. 

Each room in the school has a 



computer "drop." The computers all 
have Internet access. Each student 
when they register receives an E-mail 
address and Internet access code. 
Faculty are able to access the network 
from their home. E-mail access can 
be made from anywhere "in the 
country." 

In the old section of the library, 
plans are to have two special educa- 
tion classrooms and another larger 
regular education classroom. Some 
of the new classrooms in the north 
wing addition a re beinguscdas facul- 
ty offices. Those will eventually be 
moved Into the old library area. 

Science equipment and supplies 
are being stored in the cafeteria. 
Work is being completed on four ex- 
isting science rooms. Those rooms 
are expected to be completed in time 
for school opening. This will allow for 
emptying of the cafeteria. 

The cafeteria kitchen Includes 
new ventilation above the stoves. 
This replaces the 1962 technology 
* "which did not move much air," ad- 
mits Hockney. 

An additional service line and 
new faculty serving area will be com- 
pleted. 

The demolition of the older 
1917/29 southeast building is open- 
ing space for a new two-story entry- 
way for the auditorium. This wQl in- 
clude a stairway tower and a paved 
parking area at that end. This allows 
for easier access for auditorium 
events. 

A new ramp walkway from the 

commons area will enable a lobby 

area for the auditorium, thus: not 

. crowding the hallway at the entrance 

doors. 

The Master Plan calls for eventu- 
ally enlarging the auditorium with a 
new music area being added to that 
end. Those projects are not expected 
to be done in the near future. 

The new guidance area will not 
be completed, nor wns It projected to 
be, in time for school opening this fall. 
The counselors and career center will 
remain in theirold rooms. The larger 
areas for those rooms are expected to 
be available in October. 



ACHS holds 
orientation 



Freshman and new student ori- 
entation for Antioch Community 
High School will be held 9:30 a.m.- 
12:15 p.m. Tuesday, August 17. Stu- 
dents and parents attending should 
enter through the new main en- 
trance on the west side of the school 
off Main Street. 






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August 13, 1999 



POLICE BEAT 



Pertons charged with a crime are innocent until proven guilty In a court of law. 



ANTIOCH 



Driving Under Influence 

Jeffrey R Neubiser, 19, of Anti- 
och was arrested by Antioch Police 
at 1 :42 a.m. August 6 and charged 
with criminal damage to property 
to a 90 gallon garbage can, recycling 
bin and sod area, along with driving 
under the influence. 

No Valid License 

Randall C. Schutt, 21, of Anti- 
och was stopped by Antioch Police 
at 1:35 am August 6 and charged 
with speeding and having a driver's 
license which has been suspended 
for over 6 months. 

Parris L France, 18, of Antioch 
was stopped by Antioch Police at. 
8:27 p.m. August 5 and charged 
with driving without a valid license. 

Roger Ni Werk, i8, of linden- 
hurst was stopped by Antioch Po- 
lice at 9:28 p.m. August 3 and 
charged with having a improper 
lighting-one head lamp, operating 
an uninsured vehicle and having no 
valid driver's license. 



Minor Consumption 

Bryan N.Nichols, 20, of Anti- 
och was arrested at 2:13 am Au- 
gust 5 by Antioch Police while as- 
sisting Kenosha County Sheriffs 
Deputies in apprehending Nichols 
in connection with a traffic accident 
in Kenosha County. Kenosha 
County officials issued two traffic 
tickets related to the accident Anti- 
och charged Nichols with minor 
consumption of alcohol and pos- 
session of a fraudulent identifica- 
tion. 

Mini-Bike Complaint 

Robert A. Schultz! 17, of Un- 
ci enhurst was stopped by Antioch . 
Police at 4:29 p.m. August 3 follow- 
ing a citizen complaint Schultz 
was charged with improper opera- 
tion of an off highway motorcycle, 
driving In the wrong lane, hot hav- 
ing a driver's license on his person, 
operating an uninsured vehicle and 
having no valid registration. The 
mini-bike was impounded by Anti- 
och Police. 



LAKE VILLA ' 

Damage to property 

At ll:14a.m: oh August 4,aman 
living in the BOO block of Savanna 
Springs Dr. In Lake Villa/said the side 
window of his 1989 Plymouth van 
had been broken. Upon observing 
the van, the police officer noticed 
more glass on the outside of the car, 
with very little on the inside/Nothing 
else was damaged, and there was no 
sign of forced entry around the 
frame. 

• The'officer explained to Ander- 
son that the window appeared to 
have been blown out due to the heat, 
and a report could be filed with his 
insurance company if needed. The 
estimated value of the window dam- . 
agels$200. 

Suspicious person- arrest 

'After being dispatched to check 
on a suspicious person, a 1 5-year- old 
male was spotted sitting on the end 
of a driveway at 6 Sheehan Dr.Jte 
was acting in a suspicious manner, 
and ended up being charged with 
possession of cannabis and tobacco 
products under 18 years of age. He 
was transported to LVPD, processed, 
given a notice to appear in court on 
September 8 for both charges, and 
taken home by his sister. 

Theft from 
motor vehicle 

At 3:04 p.m. on August 8, a 
woman from Round Lake Beach 
went to the station and reported that 
her purse was stolen from her 1987 
blue Chevy Astro van while it was 
parked at 129 Central Ave. when she 
was attending Lake Villa Days. 

The suspect removed her purse 
from under the drivers seat of the un- 
secured van. The purse contained 
$100, $200 worth of concert tickets, 
four social security cards (Burdette's 
and her daughter's), three birth certifi- 
cates with her daughter's names, and 
an 111. state identification card with 
Burdette's name on it The purse is 
dark blue leather with a long strap, 
and the brand name is BenUy. The to- 
tal value for the Items stolen is $340. 
There is no suspect information. 



Hijacking victim escapes 
harrowing ordeal 

19-year-old man was forced into 
trunk of own vehicle at gunpoint 



By STEVE PETERSON 
Staff Reporter. 



A 19-year old Pistakee Highlands 
manwas able to escape from the 
trunk of a vehicle after being threat- 
ened at a Johhsburgarea gas station. 
The victim was forced' into the 
mink of his own vehicle at gunpoint. 
The carjackers threatened to kill the 
man if he did not enter the trunk. 
The victim was able to open the 
trunk from the inside after disman- . 
tling the locking mechanism and 
was able to jump out of the vehicle, 
stopped at a stop light at Route 132 
and Hunt Club Road in Gumee, ac- 
cording to Johnsburg police. The vic- 
tim then contacted the Gumee Po- 
lice Department for assistance. 

Johnsburg police chief Kenneth 
Rydberg Jr. said the gun used was 
stolen in Spring Grove. 

"He stayed calm. He kept a cool 
head and knew what he had to do," 
Rydberg said. . 

The vehicle was a a smaller mod- 
el. 

Johnsburg learned of the inci- 
dent when Gurnee police called 
them. There was great cooperation 
between Kendall County, Gurnee 



and Johnsburg police, Rydberg said.- 
As far as a motive, those charged 
simply, "wanted a rude back to 
Yorkville," Rydberg said. 

The victim's Identity was hot re- 
vealed. 

An 18year-oldfromYorkville,Il., 
Joshua Hart and a 16 year-old from 
Fox Lake were charged. Both were 
charged with numerous violations 
Including aggravated vehicular hi- 
jacking, aggravated kidnapping, 
both Class A felonies; and aggravat- 
ed assault, unlawful use of weapons, 
aggravated unlawful restraint and 

theft 

The vehicle was driven into wa- 
ters of Lake Holiday in northern 
LaSalle County. It was submersed in 
water, with only the roof of the car 
visible, authorities said. The car was 
recovered in the early morning 
hours of Aug. 7, the following day af- 
ter the incident took place at a gas 
station at Wimot Road in Johnsburg. 

Hart is being held in the Kane 
County Jail pending chargers there. 
Johnsburg police have warrants for 
him totaling $800,000. v 

The juvenile is being held in the 
Kane County ' Juvenile - Detention 
Center. 



POLICE & FIRE 



Lakeland Newspapers/ AS 




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COMMUNITY 



August 13, 1999 



Survival without refrigeration 



Some of the most profitable 
inventions have been 
made by absolute mistake. 
The Slinky for instance 
could not have possibly been pur- 
posely created by some genius, 
frolicking in his laboratory one 
day with nothing but time on his 
hands. Well, by complete acci- 
dent, I too have hit upon a solu- 
tion to the common "Mom I'm 
bored, is there any ice cream, 
chips and dip, or Market Day 
Chocolate Chip Puddin' Cakes to 
eat." 

The solution: remove the re- 
frigerator from the premises. 
That's right, just take that big, 
calorie-filled, sugar producing, 
appliance and set it out at the curb 
with the weekly trash, but please 
remember to take the door off, we 
want it to be safe. Sure the kitchen 
will look a little empty for awhile, 
but just get yourself a big potted 
plant to put in its place, and soon 
you won't even notice the gapping 
hole in the cabinetry. In fact if the 
replacement plant is big enough, 
you can decorate it at Christmas 
and forget the whole seasonal re- 
arrange-the-living-room-to-get- 
the-tree-in scenario. 

Another invention by acci- 
dent. As a parent I was constantly 
coming across a child standing in 
front of an open door refrigerator 
staring at the shelves as if some- 
thing of great taste would magi- 
cally grow where the cauliflower 
was lounging. 1 found myself 
telling our kids that if they didn't 
stop doing this, the icebox was go- 
ing to overheat, then shrivel up 
and die. But did they believe me? 
Nooo, because, like all parents, I 
am an idiot and have absolutely 




JINGLE 

FROM 

PRINGLE 

Lynn Pringle 



no Idea what I'm talking about. 

Parents just say stupid things 
like that to intimidate their off- 
spring and render them depen- 
dent. Well the Pringle children 
learned first hand that moms do in 
fact have a brain in their head, as 
our kitchen was minus a refrigera- 
tor for several days. 

There were a whole lot of sad 
faces wandering aimlessly around 
wondering what was going to hap- 
pen to all those frozen bagel dogs 
and pizzas. How can one survive 
without popsicles and Lemon Ice, 
and just how can we get through 
the day without ice cubes? Of, my 
God, There are wars, famines, and 
plagues all around us, and our 
spoiled, selfish, ungrateful urchins 
were worried about how to cool 
their Cherry Coke. Timing is 
everything, and this was the most 
profound time for visiting grand- 
parents and their "I used to have 
to cut blocks of ice from the lake 
all winter to keep our food cold" 
stories— it was beautiful. 

It's amazing how unhungry a 
child becomes when they learn all 
there is to snack on are croutons 
and rice cakes, even the dog 
turned up his nose to my mid-day 
offering. I too was a bit uneasy 
when I learned it would be at least 
four days before our new appli- 
ance would arrive, but it tickled 
my funny bone on more than one 



occasion to see a programmed 
child walk up to the spot where 
the refrigerator once stood and 
grab at a handle that wasn't there. 
Now if we could just lost the 52 
inch picture on the big box nestled 
between the shelves of the enter- 
tainment center in the family 
room, I could get me another real- 
ly big potted plant. 

And so goes another "Jingle 
from Pringle." 

Readers with information for 
"Jingle from Pringfe" should call 
Lynn Pringle at 395-6364. 



Ronald McDonald House 
awards $15,000 to NICASA 



Ronald McDonald House Chari- 
ties of Chicagoland and Northwest In- 
diana, a not-for-profit organization 
dedicated to improving the lives of 
the children in the Chicago metropol- 
itan area, awarded $15,000 to the 
Northern Illinois Council on Alco- 
holism and Substance Abuse 
(NICASA) to purchase food, infant 
supplies and support supplies, for 
their women and children's program. 

Founded in 1966, NICASA works 
to advocate alcoholics and their fam- 
ilies and to eradicate thestigmaofthe 



disease. In 1994, NICASA launched 
the women and children's program 
which provides gender-specific treat- 
ment and developmental treatment 
for children. 

"We always look for ways to help 
improve the lives of children," said 
Paul Clark, chairman of Ronald Mc- 
Donald House Charities of 
Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana. 
"By supporting organizations like 
Northern Illinois Council on Alco- 
holism and Substance Abuse, we can 
help make a difference," 




Old friend 

Christine Buik lets youngsters at the Antioch Public Library feel one of the descendants of the great 
Tyrannosaurus Rex during the Dinosaur Discoveries promotion on August 3. — Photo by Derek Nosal- 



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August 13, 1999 



999 



NEIGHBORS 






Lakeland Newspapers/ A7 



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Name: Roger Shule 

Home: Ahttoch 

Occupation: Art Teacher 

Community Involvement: District 34 referendum 
committee. Judged Christmas decorations, summer art 
enrichment classes coordinator/Instructor. 

I'm originally from: Clifton, IU. 

I graduated from: Illinois State University, Normal, 
111. * • 

My family consists of: Sandy, wife, reading recovery teacher at 
Millbum School; Greg, son, 28, chef in Vail, Col.; Chris, son, 25, in last 
year of vetemary medicine at University oflllinois-Champalgn. 

My pets are: None. Poodle of 18 years passed away last year. 

What I like best about my town: It's small and friendly. 

What I like best about my Job: I enjoy sharing my artistic talents 
and enthusiasm with students of all ages, 

The secret to my success is: Laugh everyday. A sense of humor 
is essential. 

I relax by: Water color painting, calligraphy and golf. 

My perfect day in Anuoch Would be: Morning 5K walk, break- 
fast at Lakeside, 18 holes of golf and a couple hours of studio work. 

Last book I read: Man of the Hour by Peter Blauner. 

Favorite TV show is: Due South. 

Favorite movie Is: As Good As It Gets 



NEIGHBORS 





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Club Med 

The Family Vacation Place 

by JlrVJ WARNKEN, President, North Star Travel, Inc. 

What is your idea of a Club Med Village? 

if you think of fun-loving singles, frolicking on the beach by day and partying laic 
into, ihc nighvyou're partly righi. 

A few Club Med "Villages" (resorts) still caicr to the young, single traveler. 
Buccaneer's Creek on the island of Martinique would be the first choice for the party 
seekers. 

However; most of Club Mcd's Villages arc catering to the family market. 

The best part of a Club Med family vacation is everyone gets to do their own thing. 
Don't worry, there's still plenty of family togetherness stuff. I just remember being 
jammed into the back of a statjonwagon with my four sisters having to do e verything 
together. (The doll museum in Grandforks is just not at all interesting to a teenage boy.) A 
little time on my own would have been great. 

Club Med's Village at Huatulco, Mexico has separate teen clubs for 12 to 14 and 15 to 
17 year olds, 'Where they can hang out with others their own age enjoying activities 
organized with trie help ora way-cool'GO" (French for Gcntits Organjsatcurs, Cjub Mcd's 
version of Camp Counselors). Huatulco is an ocean-lover's dream, with every room 
having an ocean view, as well as a private terrace with a hammock. Temperatures are also 
m the mind to high 80's all year. 

Another popular Club Med family village is on the Bahamian island of Elcuthcra. 
There even the 2-3 year olds have their own>"Petitc Club* 1 with down-sized facilities 
specially made to accommodate little arms and legs. There's even an air-conditioned nap 
room. Kids 4-7 can enjoy Ihc "Mini-Club" while the 8-1 1 year olds have ihc "Kids Club", 
all having programs geared to their individual age and abilities. Elcuihera is a great place 
to learn SCUBA diving. ■ 

A little closer to home, and probably the most family oriented Club Med Village is 
Sandpiper, about an hour from West Palm Beach, Florida. Here you even find a "Baby 
Club" for infants as young as 4-23 months. Sandpiper is known for its Circus Workshop 
where not just Ihc kids, but adults," too, can learn juggling, trapeze or even be a clown. 

In order to further oltracl families, Club Med is offering some great summer family 
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Favorite music: New age, soft rock, easy jazz. 

Favorite restaurant: Carmines On Rush 

My life's motto Is: Imagination Is more important 
that knowledge . . . Albert Einstein, 

If I could be anyone In history, I would be: 

Never wanted to be someone else, I Just want to be the 
best I can be. 

If I won the lottery, I would: Travel, paint, give 
private lessons. 

My greatest accomplishments are: My children. My 31 years as 
an art teacher. 

I want to be remembered as: A talented artist with a great sense 
of humor who always had time to talk or listen to others. 

People who knew me m high school would say: I would be- 
come ah artist 

My pet peeve Is: People who take advantage of others. Line cut- 
ters. People who never stop at stop signs. People who whine. 

Most In t ere s ting person I ever met was: Robert Conrad of 
WildWIldWest 

My dream Job would be: Own my own art gallery somewhere. 
Hawaii or Puerto Vallarta. 

H I had a plane ticket to anywhere, I would go to: Hawaii- 
Maul. 

If you have a "Neighbor" that you would like to see profiled in 
this column, call Neal Tucker at 223-8161. 



QjUPMe^ 




Stings into the 

GURNEE 662-2050 



supports 

Gurnee Days!!! 



. - 



M - 

GRAYSLAKE 223r0028 



Beanie- Baby Health 
Fain for Kids 

Aagusf 21 • 11 am to H pm 

Admission is FREE.' 

Children will learn about safety, first aid. fitness, 
nutrition and more with the help of Beanie Babies. 

Vision and hearing screenings 

Balloons • Face painting 

Refreshments (free popcorn 
apples and graham crackers!) 

Hot dogs, potato chips and soda 
available for purchase 

Free door prizes and Beanie Baby 
raffles (tickers pleach or 6 for $S) 

Beanie/stuffed animal clinic: 

Kids can bring in their "sick" pals 
to be "treated* 

(This is en entertaining and educational health fair-no Beanie Babies will be sold) 



Claoafo Dunne, from Mary Beths 
Beanie World magazine, wil be here 
to sign copies of her crride s and 
talk aboor Bearie "counterfeite*! 




& 



• Oil 



Provena 

Saint Therese Medical Center 

What every hospital should be * 

26 1 S Washington Street Woukegan, 1L 60035 







Friday, Aug. 13 

Fri, & Sat at 8 p.m., Sun, at 2:30 
p.m., PM&L Theatre presents 
the comedy "Lie, Cheat, and 
Genuflect" at the theatre, 877 
Main St. In Antloch,, call 395- 
3055 for tickets, $10/adults, 
$8/students & seniors 

Saturday, Aug. 14 

Undenfest *99 continues at the 
Village Haft Grounds, 2301 E. 
Sand Lake Rd. in UndenhursL 6- ■ 
. 10 p.m. Thurs., 6 p.m.rmfdnlght 
Fri., noon-midnight Sat, and 
noon-7 p.m. Sun, Parade Saturday 
at 10 a.m. 

9:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Computer Expo 
held at Lake County Fairgrounds, 
Rte. 45 & Rte. 120 In Grayslake, . 
free parking, $6 admission, call 
662-0811 for details 

10 a.m.-Noon, Page-A-Day 
Writer's Group meets at Salem 
Community Library, Info, at (414) 
843-3517 

Sunday, Aug. 15 

10 a.m;, "Field of Dreams" com- 
munity garden project needs help' 
caring for a garden of fresh veg- 
etables for the poor and homeless. 
Sponsored by Bradford Community 
Church, the garden Is located on 
north 30th Ave., adjacent to the 
Moose Lodge in Kenosha. Call 
656-0544 for details 

Annual Cardboard Boat Regatta 
held In Fox Lake. Starts at 1 p.m 

Monday, Aug. 16 

12:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch 
Senior Center, Info, at 395-7120 

6 p.m. Police and Fire Commission 
at village hall 

6:45 p.m. Bingo at Antioch' Moose 
Lodge, Rte. 173, 2 miles west of 
Antioch, Info, at 395-9780 

7:30 p.m. Antioch VWa&e Board - 
meets at village hall 

7:30 p.m. Ant/och.Coin Club 
meets at Antioch Public Library 



7:30 p^m. Lakes Area Community 
Band at ACHS, info, at 395,-5566 

TUesday, Aug. 17 

9-il a.m., Blood Pressure 
Screening at Antipch.Piggly Wiggly 

■ 

6:45 p.m. Antioch VFW Bingo, 
Doors open 4:30 p.m., 395 ; 5393 

7 p.m., School Board meeting, 
Grass Lake Dist #36 

Wednesday, Aug. 18 

9 a.m. - Noon Antioch United 
Methodist Church holds Parents 
Day Out for infants to 5 year olds, 
call 395-1362 

7 p.m., Burlington Genealogical 
Society meeting held, with guest 
speaker Pam Kehoe on Irish cul- 
ture, for info., call 41,4-763-6981 

••• ■*»••■: > -..i. ........ 

7 p.m. Antioch Park Board meets 
at village hall 

7:30 p.m. The Republican Club 
meets at Antioch Twp.\Hall, 395- 
1670 for details 

Thursday, Aug. 19 

7:30 p.m., Loon Lakes Manage- 
ment Association meets at Antioch 
Senior Center, 817 Holbeck Dr. In 
Antioch 

7:30 p.m. Antioch Community 
High School Board meets 

GOTSOMCTHING 
GOING ON? CALL US! 

A 14-day notice is needed 
for all calendar requests. 
Call223-8161 andaskfbr 
calendar assistance. 



A8/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



August 13, 1999 



Power lines can help pilots find way home 



By MICHAEL H. BABiCZ 
Community Edftoi 



High tension power lines have 
served as more of a life saver to 
pilots flying in and out of Campbell 
Airport rather than a threat to air 
safety. 



The power lines have come 
under scrutiny in light of a plane 
crash Aug. 5 that claimed the life of a 
Grayslake resident, two Lindenhurst 
residents and the plane's pilot from 
McHenry. 

The four persons, three men 
and one women, were killed when 



their four-seat, single-engine Piper 
Arrow "straight tail" plane struck the 
high-tension power lines, crashing 
and bursting into flames. 

The crash took place just south 
of Campbell Airport near Round 
Lake Park in Fremont Township, In 
unincorporated Lake County. The 



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Cardiac/Pulmonary Rehabilitation 
Physical, Speech, Occupational 
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Owner, Operator 

491 S. Hunt Club Rd., 

Gin nee, IL 60031 

847-549-6090/609 1 



plane was registered to the pilot as 
Its owner. 

Victims were Reld Borgeson, 55, 
of McHenry, the pilot; John 
Robinson, 56, of Grayslake, co-pilot; 
Pamela Wright, 27, of Lindenhurst, 
seated behind the pilot; and her 
husband, Barry Wright, 29, of 
Lindenhurst, seated behind the co- 
pilot, according to the Lake County 
Coroner's Report. 

The coroner's preliminary 
report said all four died as a result of 
massive external and internal 
Injuries. 

The crash occurred just before 
10 p.m. Aug. 5 as the group was 
returning from a leisurely flight, 
according to Lake County Coroner 
Barbara Richardson, who was at the 
scene just hours after the accident 
early In the morning on Aug. 6. 
Reports indicated the group had 
flown to Lake Lawn Lodge in 
Delavan, Wis. near Lake Geneva for 
ice cream and were returning. 

"The plane was on approach to 
the airport when it hit the wires," 
Richardson said, based upon eye- 
witness accounts. 

There was a fire," Richardson 
added. 

Greg Formica, Grayslake Fire 
Department Deputy Chief, con- 
firmed there were a number of wit- 
nesses — many from the local 
area— on the scene when fire units 
arrived. 

"We don't know what caused the 
plane to go down," Formica said. The 
fire department's preliminary 
actions were to extinguish the fire, 
check for survivors, then secure the 
scene and provide support for the 
sheriffs department and coroner. 

Formica confirmed the fire 
department had to await arrival of 
Commonwealth Edison crews, but 
that they "arrived in a timely man- 
ner," shutting down power to the 
location, approximately one-half 
mile north of Route 60, just east of 
Peterson Road. 

The plane went down, clipping 
the highest of several high-tension 
power lines, causing a blue flash, 
then a flame as it fell to the ground, 
according to witnesses. It was 
roughly one-half mile south of the 
airport. Power to residents in the 



area was not disrupted. 

"I heard a loud thump and 
thought it was just another accident 
on Route 60 because we seem to 
have a lot of: them," said Patrick 
Flanagan, a Fremont Ave. resident 
who lives less than a half-mile from 
the crash scene. Flanagan assisted 
sheriff's squads in finding a farm 
roadway back to the crash site. 

The plane landed in a farm field 
with soy beans growing, leased by 
Fremont Township Supervisor Pete 
Tekampe. Tekampe noted he has 
farmed in the area for the past 29 
years and never had: a plane go 
down before. 

Denise Quinn, who lives with her 
family at the end of Fremont Avenue 
to the east of the site, said she did not 
hear anything unusual. Quinh 
explained she has often heard planes 
going overhead during the four years 
she has lived there, but never worried 
about any going down. 

The pilot was experienced, 
according to a relative at the scene. 
He lived in McHenry and his plane 
had been based at Campbell Airport 
for the past year. The pilot was a for- 
mer flight instructor, but was not 
employed as such nor did he have 
any connection with the flight 
schools based at Campbell. 

The four left Campbell between 
6-6:30 p.m., "just out for a ride," 
according to Richardson. 

Some family members, con- 
cerned while following television 
news reports of a crash, arrived on 
the scene and were escorted by 
Grayslake Fire Department person- 
nel and Lake County. 'Sheriffs 
deputies to an ambulance. Ttjey 
waited there, removed'jffbm, the 
media, until Wchardson Informal 
them of the fate of me victims. 

Oh the morning of Aug. 6, the 
.* crash site* was turriedipver to 
members- - of the ■" Natl ottflJ 
Transportation Safety^Boaid 
(NTSB) and the Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA). j.i 

In short media briefings? the 
NTSB and FAA said it cbu)d,be>'ix 
• months before their final reports are 
available. Following the field Inves- 
tigation, the site was cleared as the 
wreckage was moved to a hanger at 
Campbell for further analysis; 




Pilot not concerned 
with lines, safety 
record despite crash 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



High-tension power lines near. 
Campbell Airport are typically used 
by pilots as a guide toward the run- 
way. 

The crash Aug. 5 of a small 
plane near Campbell has brought 
attention to the wires and whether- 
they are safe. 

John Tierney of Lake Villa, a for- 
mer licensed pilot who frequently 
flew out of Campbell, . said the 
power lines could serve as a life line 
back to the airport in case of bad 
weather or poor visibility. 

"If you were having difficulty 
finding your way home, you' could 
always follow the power lines and 
you knew you'd find the airport," 
Tierney explained. 

"It's a very safe airport," Tierney 
said: "I can't think of any airport of 
its size in the country which is any 
safer," 

Tiemey's praise is echoed in the 
safety record of the airport, 

A 30-plus year employee of, the 
airport, who preferred not to be 
identified in the media, said he 
could onlv recall one accident on 



airport property that resulted in a 
fatality. 

There was one other accident 
away from the airport that resulted 
in fatalities, but that was at least ten 
years ago, according to airport per- 
sonnel. 

The airports listed as "uncon- 
trolled," as there is no control 
tower. Pilots are not required to file 
any type of flight plan when using 
Campbell. 

For the airport, built in the 1950s 
on land that was formerly a pig farm, 
there are two basic standard pat- 
terns for approach and take off. The 
one which was In use the night of the 
crash was a southwestern approach 
over the 300-foot-high power lines. 
Referred to as "27" due to its being at 
270 degrees on an airplane's com- 
pass, the normal pattern would have 
a plane keeping a minimum 800 foot 
altitude, at least '500 feet above i the 
lines, 

Tierney explained his "base" 
approach was generally in the 
1,500-1,800 foot altitude with the' 
wires having no effect what so ever. 
Airport personnel said that until the 
crash, there have not been any Inci- 
dents Involving the wires. 






'MWMKnvfC 







nw ii p ipi 







August 13, 1999 




COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ A 




Females 
Seeklng!Mj9les 



1-900-896-5999 



_ TAKE A CHANCE 

Wftli W*fl<K ■ SWM, 24-so, lor MwidsNp rm. pos- 
i*ly a bng-lemi romenea Sha enjoys working out and raw 
rsperloncos.Ad*3544 "" ' vuw,no ™ w - 

■ JNTEBEaTED IN TALKING 

Mini ov^i, daoawTo pottc*. ind mora. She 4 tootdng 
Iwtposflive.lrtcu'ala SWPM, 55-67, Adl.2714 
00N7 WATT ANY LONGER 

rreki W1.6330 

MAKE ME LAUGH 
R^ovjng ird outgoing, tttt W, 18, ST, 130**. wth 

brown heWeyta, kt a Hubert Mho Bom going ou wttttfads, 

fi^wiMaT* *" IMUnB ' "^ m m ** T *' 

SOMEONE UKE YOU 
AWWH rwrojwaNre 47<a btue^bbndewhokwtt 
.gg«A»»« jrdljrria, ~.ft ISO in attractive, humorout. n 

V. HOLD ONTO YOUR HEART 

JU3T8AYiTr-- 
Attn-*** SWF. 26, (Mtui Won* hair, green 9ft*. smoker. 

OUTQOINa 

Liuahindrwif»*^l^gr»«v«y«Jbnrt)8«SWF,3a 

Her rferestt incuJe cooting. rnovtes, muse and dkirg ou, 

and ihe seeks in adventurous, [tfTtovkvj SWM. 35-50, win i 

whom lo share tries* things end more. Ad)680S 

i, . . LOOKYHERE 

Tm ii hm emptoyed SWF. 20, 5T.' UObs. who enjoys 

- -■ . " .' A MATCH MADE IN HEAVEN ; 
MmMWm. ctJege-gotog SWF. J9. 5T. 120**;, wth i 

curly brown ha* and blue ore*, t student, who enjoys sport*, 
watering movies, and going ou. It toting tor s lafcauva 
SWM. f 9-23. wro ikes to go ou tnd htve a good urn*. 
ArJI.0681 

MUSIC IS MY PASSION 

STy al first sw rnom of one. 41. 5T. wth brown hit and 
htal eyes, ■**• •ows* t*m and fefc mudc pbytng gu- 
ler/garrMw and mm wafu. Sht teaks in remit, sircar*, . 
spWuai, employed DWM. 35-59, wfch ■ good tenia ol humor, 
ACJI8006-- ■■ 

INSPIRED? 
Thte tweet errpbyedSWF. 24. 5*. I30bt, win red hat and 
bmw eyas, dsablod, enjoyt rrxrvfet, shepping. dandngjnd 
museums, it looting lor a caring, rones SWM. 24-25, to 
tpand quaky tima WSh Ad«J372 
FOREI 
AttrKtVa'DWPF. 45, erjcyt ptayton 50K, a^ is ISO a suc- 
c*s^adfrt.[urMovWxjSV^4^.WioiiuMoplirg,iniv- 
ting. oAural adhriUes. and bike rang Ml 1832 
>,*$*> **" GET AWAY FROM IT ALL 
Country nuic, inimatt and Baa -markets am fust a few Wer- 
est* ife humorous SWF. 55, 4 , 11\ patlt. wth brown 
hair/eyes She's ISO a spontaneous SWM. 50*0 Ada 5795 

GET IN TOUCH 
Sha't a SWPF. 28. win brown hat-eyes, who Una lerm, 
dancing. being wih Iriends. and wiichrg mowes. and seeks 
aSVAC26-32.togoixJanddotrinojwiJriWl.5953 

GREAT CATCH . 
This SWPF. 29. 5*4". 105bs, with brown hair/eyes, who 
anjoyi trying new things, rnolorcydas and noriong out. woUd - 
kwa To mast an anafljetic, atlradWa SWM. 27-39, who knows 
.what Ihoy want ouc/ Ma. Ada. 9751 • 
QUALITY TIME 
Bbnda and graon-eyad, this MHigured SWF.-31, 6V, who , 
enjoys movies, fishing, and coing k>r car dmw, h looking tor 
a uncare. hooesl SM 23-W Adi 8882 

MAKE A LOVE CONNECTION 
Big hearted, aRedionila SWF, 41, 235t>a.. win brown „ 
hair/eyas, a srroKar, anjoys haalh dubs, scons, rrovSes, 
dancing and much mora She wants lobuid a raationsNp with ■ 
an honost, dow[^lo-aan^ open-minded SWM. Adl.1762 
DYNAMIC -■:•: -j^fe 
Upbeat SWF. 31. S*4'. a luMlgued, ' 
anioyi her work, concerts, must, movtos 
soaking a nsponsUa. lun-lovkx iSWM. 27-45 Adf 4 

SENSUOUS SOUL MATE 
This pbylii, pretty, prowxawo. honest, upbeat, considarale, 
attactionata. rad-haadad SWPF. 52. taaka an actjv*. fuv4ov> 
raatMRuC romantic. w^gioorTiad, dagraed DWPM, N&, 
4fr5^ tot thaalw, movies, dnng. Iaught»r. Wng, indknnng 
Ml.e99?'-»»«--V*. ■*•■-' J r 

SOMEONE JUST UKE YOU 
AancWa, yoor^Hooking. coBoga-degreed SWF.- 42. 5'1f, 
wth ttonda hair and bkn eyas, anjoys working out, sports. 
:movtos and iwefing. teaks ■ chtfess, sacua. fa, WS 
SWPiWtHa, orarCwah timlar irt tresis. lor a ITR leaning 
10 mimage Adl 4037 

MAKE ME LAUGH 
This tat. slander, pretty SWF. 22, Is an easygoing romantic 
whotnjMspooim&wadririgouLardkTgwalkiAniyou 
the handsome, wictre SWU,-2l-30, who can maka bar 
laugh? Adl 8820 ■'• 

LOOKING FOR ROMANCE • 
A very acUva and aoirgetic gaLlhit SWF. 18. 5'8*. I1»s. 
with tkndehair and brown eyas. Uub oardng. rnusic, read- 
ing, fishing and moraj If you're a romantic SWM, 21 -28. and 
Uuj what you see, leave her a message today Adl M36 

PERFECT CHEMISTRY 
a you Ike reading, music movies and sports, you rave a W in 
a>rr*Ttviw<hrw,lr«sanerl«e,h*vfc^ardsina)reDWF, 
44. 57. wih brown hiir/Byti She's hoping you're a dassy 
SWM. 44-55. who knows how to Imal a lady. Ad*. 1 206 

ROMANTIC AT HEART 
Sincere. intoJSgoni. kjvirig SWPF. 48, 5V. I2&n . w4h Uown 
hair/eyes, enjoys cavidtfght draws, long walks on the beach, 
cooking, conceits, and dancing. She seeks in honest, wam\ 
caring SM, 40 pka. who b ertromdy aBadonate. Adt.41G0 

• HAPPY ENDINGS 
Just your type, meet this upbeat, rxsaive-mindod SWF, 39. 
5'5". amply cunracoous. w<h dark, dramatic, pood boks. who 
warts to Imd that special guy, a uJ. husky SWM. 35-50. 
actively involved in sports, playing pool, fishing and the OU- 
doon Adl.18t5 • -^ 

AREYOUUSTEN1NG7 
SW mom, 29, 5'8", modkrn bukt. a gorgeous greerveyed 
bkmde. warts to find a man wth whom aha can shara a won- 
derful Iriendship wiA An Irtewgant, considarale, ha^dsoma 
SWM. 30-38. snoUd cal immoualary. Adl.B97B 

-- AFUTUREFAMILY 
Refiablt, bd*at*SWmomol ona. 27, W.'wah an average 
buikt, dark bfonda hair and bkw eyes, who enjoys time ou- 
otooo and w4h iRonds. a kxijng (« a SWM, 25v4, a rVS. 
who anjoyt childran.Adl.7417'.- : .' 

■ - CLASSY LADY 

Very attractive, slender and peut SWJPF. 45. 57, 125fcs , 
with ctonde hair and brown eyes. Is searching lor an educat- 
ed, handsome SWM. 40-50, hVS, who enjoys nature, carping. 
the iheairo and more. Ad*.90O3 

STOP HERE! 
She's an ongoing, (un-bving SWF, 45, wih brown hair/eyes, 
v.ro txwsgcwlww&ianirnala and sports. She's kxAing 
lor a skxenj SWM. 38-50. Adl.4081 

BE HONEST WITH ME 
Passkmata. personable S8F. 34, 57,'165t*, wth dark 
hair/oyes, It looking tor a sincert, caring SWM. 40-50, who 
adt Bta an adut She loves Ihe outdoors, yard work, parks 
and movies AdH 189 

MUST LOVE CHILDREN 
iVery pretty, ha>kwing S8 mom. 29. ST. wMi brown hair and 
eyes. It seeking t spontaneous, honest SM, 30-*2, tor a LTR 
She enjoys cooking, travel sports, sparring time with her 
children and more. MI5I1B 

SUMMER NIGHTS . 
SWF, 5 1 . 57, 1 1 1ta , wih blonde hair and blue ayes, enjoys 
tone walks, onng out , dancing, twVnningjtndmuchnion),ls 
boJSog lor a patent, oomie and caring SWM, under 55, lo 
share If a with. Adl 2559 

GOD BLESS YOU 
Caring, lun, pretty SWF. 59, wih brown hair and bk» em 
enjoys irtng oul. cohorts, and travoing. is ISO a SWM, 55- 
70, wih similar inlet ests Adl 2975 

ALWAYS AND FOREVER 
Itar^-ernployod OWF, 54, 5'4*. who enjoys book stores. 
SimuUiing corrvarsations. the arts and Cving He lots futcsS. 
sookta corrpelible. caring SWM, 50-65 lor possible relalon- 
ship.Adl.7KJ1 

i LOOKINO FOR LOVE , 
OWF, 45. 5'6\ 185IJS.. altractrva and phystalY «. • .taacher 
wih one cWl and drVerM WorasU, Is teaking a SWM. 40-55, 
tor lun, passion, con^ntowhip, Inendshp, and a tong4onn 
relaiionsrup.Adl.9239 . 

''• NOTHING SWEETER 
Easygoing SWF. 46, 57. with bkwde hair and preen eyes, 
who wjoyt wottog oU, dandng, rrusfc bikinaTwig; «*s. 
and swfnming, Is hoping to meet a luvkwmg, Fal SWM. 40- 
55.toipendfimowithAdi.2133 

DONTHESmTE ' 
AllractlvB OW irom. 45, with btonde har and grot < ./os. 
wants to (kid a Hnd SWM. over 65, ready to shara compan- 
ionship and mUual interests AdJ 9945 

TAKE A LOOK J* 

SWF, 42, ST. wih brown haWoyes, who anjoyi home 
improvement, Iht oUdoors. garoWng. taking wa Iks, rwsic 
and bicycling, seeks a trustworthy SWM, 38-45. Adi.3425 



Putting fhe PS8B8& To^f hefwifH 



Personals 




by... Lakeland Ne 




To listen to 
describe the 
respond 

-900-896-5 

. ly $119 per mtaote win tedi 

monthly it icphooc bilL To oicihii service you muil be 
! ! yon of igc « older tod hive i towbtoot phone. 



Look for Personals every Friday in the Lakeland Newspaper. 



LOOK OVER HERE 

Afiraorve SWPF. 49. 5V, wih rtdrJthoroM hair, who enjoyt 
boalhg. movSes and dningoU, Is waling to hear from a SWM, 
. 4 9-60. Adl, 7064 

COMPATIBILITY 

CtfflD^pro(atttoftt» SWF. SO, ST, wUh btonde hak- and 

i brown tyaa. who antoy* sports, reidng, ptMnadMngouLM' 

Iheaier and trtya, is seeking a tuning, aincere SM, 40-55, 

wih8irrrtariniarests.Adl.e974 

t-ETS TALK SOON 
Easygotog SW mom. 48, 57, 1456a, wlii gny ayes, who 
- enjoyt the oudoon. ctirpinft country music, good oomarttdon 
and mora Is boking lore srr»aSWM, under 5S Adl 6428 

"DAY BY DAY. 
AnradivaSWF,32.w\3eri^rj^^thetN»terandTOra,b 
looking tor a canng. lurvlovrg SWCM, 30-40, who has a good 
sonae of hunt* AoJ.7980 

rrSNOTTOOUTE 
Alfecuonate SWF. 61f 57. llSfca. wth gny htlr and hazel 
tyaa. wishes .to meal a compaifcle SWM, 6944, tor wondertut 
imesiogothorAdl.llH 

"GOALOR1ENTED WOMAN 
Loving; sensitive and tafworldhg, this SWF, 37, 5*4*. 1 50bs , 
wWibbndt hak and grttn tyaa, anbyt wato, gaidaninadano- 
tortrnovlaa and making new Iriends. She seeks a corrpattte 
SWM, 35-45. wih a great sense of humor. Adl 6910 

CHASING A DREAM 
Happy SWP mom. 44. who anjoys motorcycles, spandrg Smt ■ 
al the park, music and long wafts, tt hoping to meet a wity 
SWPM. 4051 who has a good soma ol rum Adl.1241 -. 



OROWWTTHME 

DWPF, 57, 5', 130fci, wth brown hair and blue eyes, who 

, enpyt got; music, dancing, camping, traveling and oonvana* 

lion. Is seeking a dependable SWM. 50®, tor friendsho first 

maybe mora Adl. 1945 

A POSITIVE CONNECTION 
Mysoaithl9onforanlrtefic^r^oonc^rviJSVVM.58-67who 
woUdertoysperrfng lime wih a lovely, educated SWF, 64, S'fT. 
slander, wih btonde hak* and blue tyaa. MI.B767 

LET ME HEAR FROM YOU 
Meat this sweet SW mom, 39. 5T, slander, wth brown hak and 
blue tyaa. who anjoyi gardt wg, moviaa, musie, concerts, 
rttdng and outdoor adhrlbaa. Sht taaki a 1un4ovlrig.aasygo- 
ing SWM, 37-48, b shara t pieasant reladorviNp. 'Ml. 189 

YOUR INTERESTS? ' 
SWF, 48, ST, 125U, wth green sytt, la looking tor t good- 
natured SWM, over 44 HerWorastsinckde browsing in book 
stores, the (healer, the open, fitness ind aviaiion Ada .1842 

NEW CHAPTER 
Anradive SWF, SO, who enjoys rns dining, gourmal cooking, 
got and the oUdoon.it taauig a nice, handsome SWM 
Adf ,5055 

OONT KEEP ME WATTING 
Ongoing SW mom of one, 34, 5*8*, wth tubum hair and green 
ayes, who tnjoyt sports, bowing ind mora, b looking tor an 
easygoing. responsWe SWM, over 29. with a gnal tense of 
humor. Adl.8253 ' 



1 



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SICK OF BEING SINGLE 

Blue-eyed btonde DWF, 50, ST. tlOtos , is seeking a humor- 
ous, handsome SWM, 45*5, to tha/a travel, cooking, gardarv 
jng and laughter. AdiiTOI 

HAVE A HEART 
Fun, sweet SWF, 28, 5'6*. a green-eyed btonde, who enjoys 
movies, drag oU and ihe ouooors. seeks a senathra, good- 
naturod SWM; 25-35. who loves tfa Am.7965 

OLD-FASHIONED 
Down-to-earth SW mom, 44, fuUigurtd, wih bng brown 
hakfeyas. a smoker, who anjoys long drives In Iht country, cook- 
ing, cuddfog and walking hand to lord, taeualartwy-oriented 
SWM. 40-49. tor Iriendship TnL Ad4.8744 

- DINNER A A MOVIE? 
Sincere, loving DW mom. 52. S'S", 1751a., wih lubum hair. 
who anjoyt bowing, caroing. long waJkt and the oUdoon, It 
teaking a handsome SWM, 45-65, wth similar Weresu. tor t 
LTRAoWtCS 

THE PRIME OF UFE 
Easygoing SWF, 65, who enjoys dancina dring ou, travat, 
sports and more, wxJd fca lo meet a corrpalfcie S'iVM, 65-75 
AdliS38 • ..".•- 

/.SEI2ETHEDAYI 
'AtSflNVshy SWF, 18.5T, (lOta.wth brown hak and green 
eyes, Ikes playing pool and beach walks. She warn to meet a 
fuHovlng. employed SM. 18-25, tor quaity limes together. 
Adl.4512 

GENTLE ON MY MINO 
I'm a warmhearted, attract w SAF.40. SS*. 1 20ta . fvTS. who 
is looking lor a caring, aflectionale SWM. 39-50. tor a meaning- 
IJrelatiorvshipAdt!9888 

UNTIL NOW 
AnradJvt, humorous SWF. 65. 57, I20fcs. wth raddoh- 
blondo lair and blue eyes. I>:/S, who enjoys oining out travel 
rnovtos, and romantic evenings, seeks a similar SWM, 60-69. 
Adl.7151 

READY FOR A DATE 
TTis lowg. employed SWF, 28. 5S*. wth btonde hak ind bkie 
eyes, hat a figure thai stops traffic. She enjoys muse cats. 
darong. movies, smoking, and seeks a tuvtowg SWPM 26- 
3&MI36S5 - - 

ENJOY LIFE 
Personable SWF, 68,55*, 145ft*. is searching tor a fun4oving, 
IrienoTr/ SWM, NTS, who enjoys goe". dtokig out movies and 
mora. Adl 6761 

SHARE UFE 
SWF. 40. who anjoyi nature, phrjtography, oU moviaa. yoga, 
antiques and more.lt seeking tn open, IrTanoTy SWM, wthou 
crvUrea Adl 3609 

HEAVEN SENT 
SWmom. 24, ST, 1351a. wth btonde hair and blue eyes, who 
anjoyt bifiards. bowftog, horseback ridtog and NASCAR, seeks 
arespcdUSWM,»^5Ad*2536 

MANY OPTIONS 
Personable, oUgoing SWF. 48. who, enjoys movies, board 
garos. concorts. (osuvals, sporting evonts and rrtxaL e Icolim 
lor a SWPM, 45-55, NTS. who Is secure and good-humored 
AdJ.1689 

EASYTO PLEASE 
Honost caring, passtonale SWF, 45, ST, 200ta.. wth brown. 
hair/eyes, ervpys ihe outdoors, swimrnng. outdoor concerts. 
movSea ard quiet evenings. She's ISO a SWM, 45-55. t l*S, 
casual drinker. Adl. 6631 

ROMANCE IS AUVE 
Loving DW mother. 40, ST, lOOfc*, wth brown hak/eyes, 
seeks a Irustworthy SWM, 384a wtya.rrnjoyt the outdoors, < 
roliomladirvg.fea<fr^vc4urteerworkandrno«LAdl.fc5l7 .•..'< 

SUMMER A HARLEYS. 

ATtfa<r^eSWF,44,5r,lrompk)ru>wtstlndktna.lfi|^ ' 

activities. She seoks a handsome, muscular, consfr-xtion type, 
rrmaSWM,39-49,lortpossbterelaicnsrip.Ad*-9"36 

CHECK (TOUT 
Skeere. honed SWF, 25, 56', wth btoa eyes, b toktoolpr a 
Irntvakind SWM, 25J4, tor a possbls rataikxtship. Adl7734 

ALOTOFFUN 
Fui-tovlrg SWPF, 29, ST. wth curly red hair and bkw ayes. 
who orJws traveling, cooking, movies and sporeing time wth 
Iriends, seeks a SWM. 2JV35.Adl.9647 

• YOUR LUCKY DAY 
fiaiygoing. Iriendly DW mother ol two, 29, 5T, 21 Ota, wih 
brown hi! and bha eyes, is seeking an outgoing, sincere SWM, 
25-40, who enjoys movies, taking walks, music, Native 
American an and more. Adi 4080 



A KIND LISTENER 
Personable SWPF, SI, ST, 140tbs., wth dark hakfeyra, who 
•ry^scu^rKipairtirigajxlpfayvyjfc&gular.lslSOawarm- 
haarted SWM, 4060, w*o Mat dancing and Ova theaiec 
Adl.9303 

READY TO SETTLE DOWN 
Sweet and rumous SWF, 23. ST. 190t», t btot-syed 
brunetlaiaee)uanene™iJc,oUgot«ardoperHTwv^ 
15-26 Ad 1 9333 

THE CHOICE IS YOURS 
SWF, 50, 57. llObs.. wth bkmde hair and hazel tyes, who 
e.'TyS r easing, fining out movie S, dancing, ta king walks and 
mora,bhc^torneetaSVA1.46V65.Adi.63*0 
WAITING FOR YOUR CALL 
Oup^ir»orgar»iod,ralredSWPF.67 1 5T. 185ta, wih brow 
hair/eyes, anjoyt playing piano, theater, dancina and playing 
ordsonin«corn?Uer.S^s«k5aSWPK55^.A£jl5j54 

CELEBRATE UFE 
Pette. run-twig OW mom, 40, wihJght brown har and green 
eyas, who enjoys raadtog, outdoor activities ind Imretng. it 
seeking an honest SWM. 38-45, tor companionship. Adl.5133 

' WORK ETHIC 
Active, creative SWF, 41. 5V. wth blonde hak and btoa eyes, 
very (t, who anjoyt readk^gw Jogging, cooling arri more, is 
baking lor a sincere, energetic SWM, 35-45, who knows what 
[hey wan Irom 0a Adf.9771 

HONEST VALUES . 
Pette SW mom , 26, wants to get together wth an honest, car- 
ing SWCM, 2037. to share her interests to movies, music 
moonU walks, outdoor activities and tftorulaling convorsaiioni 
AdlS201 

HAPPY IN UFE 
Happy, personable SWF, 4 1. who enjoys ihs Iheaier, music, ae- 
'atnre iris, be artariainmen and dning out is seeking a suc- 
cessful opervmindod SWM Adl.5958 

GAMBLE ON ME 
Fiienfy. outgoing SWF. 31, SV. wth brown hair and haul 
eyes, who enjoys bog walks and the outdoors, is seeking tn 
honest SWM, who ikes children. Adt.5960 

SOMEONE SPECIAL ,, 
Pette, anradive SWF, 51, who anjoyi king wafts, garage sales. 
flea markets, movies and concerts. Is seektog an active, ener- 
getic SWM Ad*.3331 

SHARE EVERYDAY THINGS 



3Md Adf 3036 

SIMILAR INTERESTS? 
An educated SWM, 25-35, who enjoyt dancing, dubbing. Ihe 
outdoors. iraveSng and more, Is tie perfect match tor this eHer- 
vescer* SWF. 30, W . ItOfos. , wth reddehorown hak and btoa 
eyes.Adl.9732 

READY FOR ROMANCE 
Pleasart SWF. 40, 5T, wth btonde hak and brown tyes. who 
enjoys movies, dancing, dining out and quality conversation, 
has nor heart sot on mooting a sincere, handsome SWPM. 37- 
47.Adl.8930 

LET THINGS DEVELOP 
B you tnjoy waiehing movies, ihe outdoors, going to church and 
longwaAs, you have a tot In common wth ihatensawe. caring 
SWF, 34. bfcyidish-rjrown hair and green eyes. She dearer, a 
mature SWM. 34-41. tor great corrjanonshtj. Adl.7420 

CAPTURE HER ATTENTION 
Shy SWF. 54, 5T. HOfos..wlh rod hair and brown tyes. whose 
• Her ests Include Imal, hktoa :Jki and classical music, the out* 
doon and tiring out Is boking for an enernete SWPM, 44-55, 
whoBveslietoihehJest.Adl.1851 ' 
'• JUSTSAYYES 

Set-etnptoyed WWWP mom ol one. 43, paila, wth dark auburn 
I hair and brown eyes, who enjoyt the oudoort, InvetnadMng 
out and sports, is txiking lor a lamOy-orienlod SWPM7 3548. 
NTS . Ada 6073 

THIS 13 n* 
Slender SWPF. 40, ST. wth brown hair/eyes, who enjoyt bike 
riding, travel and more, is seeking a handsome, ktafigert 
SWM, over 35, lo have lun wih Adtf 1692 

"A STUDENT 
Fii>loving and energetc SWF, 18. S7, 120t», wth red hak 
and SgN Okie eyas, who enjoys horses and Ihe rjUdoors, is 
looking tor a SWM, 16-19 Adl.6630 





» 



I 



1-900-896-5999 



ATTHACTTVETEACHER 

SWM, 27, 6*, 175bt, who enjoys oood converatioa prrysfcaJ 
Hnata, mmrkto, comedy, pktyirvj>»l,lanri* cheat, rt^rtt. the 
oUdoon. nmartc moontt wafts, and quiet times, taaka a 
SWF. under 35. lot a bng4arm rttotknaNp. Adl.8843 

LOVEAWAITS . 
SWM, 49, 5'1 0*. who enjoyt classic cars, romantic wafts, and 
more, is looking lor a sweet, sincere SF, 3055. Adl.7280 

GREAT CATCH 
Active, aeon ind romtrrfc DWFM. 49, 510", IfOba, wth 
brown hatftyea, who enjoys dinners out dandng and kuz, ' 
r«JtsirarTpalbteSWF.4u-<9,loraposs^LTFtAd*-2S9 

TAUCTO YOU SOON 
This SWM, 31. who Ptas weekend traveing, music, anknals, 
and oUdooractJvties. is looktogtor an hatast rr^ura. cornmu- 
r4calryaSWF.Adl.4671 

NEW OUTLOOK 
A movie bufl who antoyt music and making new Wends, "his 
SWM2af?ir.160t»j wth btond hair anfenen eyes, seeks 
a SWF who sharu simiar kiansia Ad* 2629 

GAROENINQ IS PEACEFUL 
Outgoing, fun-toving SW dad, 39. W. 1 TObt , btond wth, blue 
eyes and a cense of humor, Ikes wcodworiong. movies, and 
metorcyefrn g rto a t»ldr>J fat air-gat pro^ 
45, who Bat a Ma advtrturt and cuddahg in front of the TV.- 
ArJI.1102 

• LISTEN TO ALL HIS UKE3 
Sal-rttanl DW dad. 41, 5*11*. 200fot wth dark ha it who 
enjoys working oU. country music, ccciuna and rnecantoals t 
bokro for a best Iriend, a securt SWF, 31-46, tor t monoga- 
mouB.eratatcnship.iWI.4093 

- BESTFR1ENDS 
Honest physically fit r^-emptoyed SWM, S3, S'10*. 195bt. 
wth gny hair/aye*, seeks an attractive, hurrorous, spkluW. 
SWF^undtr 48, who enjoys rnovias. got. boating, woriongou, 

ALL WE NEED IS LOVE 

Frlandry, conrmrnbtfiva SWM, 50, 510*. ISGtja. is seeking a 

-. pette, aflractivt SWF, 42-62, who is honest and artjoys outdoor 

activties, dring ou. the iheaier, and qjiet timet at home 
■ Adl.8782 - 

IT ALL ADDS UP 
Check ou this gocdtookjng SWM, 28, ST. fWrim. alNetic 
" buffd, nWfch har and brown eyes He's hoping to spend qual- 
- kyTJme wtha lurMovtogSSF,21-35.whocaishareiwrteiests 
. in rnotorcyt^movieidafxraxja^cfcw^oa Adl.4386 - 
SOUTHWEST SUBURBS 
This vary aff acftonala SWM 45, 6, is a homeowner wih no 
deptrrdtntt, who ■ also an animal and nature tovat Ht't ISO a 
SrDF. age izwnportant Al cab returned Adl 8461 
LETS PUT THE TOP DOWN 
Spona<»eouapVvil~*B, frtyVw»*iJitond hak. and blue eyes. 
NTS. teeks a htn-tovlng. oUgolng SWF, urtW 5i lor tnerdshp 
rrst meybe more He anjoyi temti dutarrj. voloybal, dogs, 
auctkmbng wafts and ihe wnd in his ak. Ad*. 6289 

., LETS MEET SOON 
Maka Bmt tor Ma SWM.1S, 511'. muscular butU brown 
haiey^wthacr^aervjitjvenil^eH^lhougrtarec^ 
tared on irarino good limej ind a meaningful Wendsho WUi « 
dyna-nic. dazdfng SWF, 18-23. who'i toto b*ino, movies end 
nature waks. Ad? 1063 

- HANDYMAN 
SW dad of one, 58. STJTOtoa. wth brown hair, btoa tyaa and 
a beard, enjoys got, bowtng. board and card games, gourmet 
cooking, and romance. He's boking (or a fit attractive SWF, 
urder36.Adl.8Sa2 

ONE IN A MfLUON 
Why not cat this lenstfct SWM, 18,5'ir. 195tos, wih brown 
hat/ayes? He anjoyt pubic service and would ike to meet a 
special SWF. 18-25. Adl.4173 

I DONT BITE 
TNs SWM, 40, ST. 210ft*. wth brown haWtyes, who enjoys 
movies, concerts, and dining out, is boking tor a lab-back SF. 
2 1 <50, to go ou and have a good bmt wth, Adl 7463 

WELL-EDUCATED 
Retired SWM, 80. S'JO*, I75bs. wth btond/whta hair, tores 
got. fisrwig.rr«dning,and cruses. He's ISO a siendor, pleas • 
anlSWF.6075.tow?jyandsrx)«.Adl.782i 

CHEMISTRY 
PorsoraUeSWM4a,67,wiihbrovmhakandhartley«3.*ho 
encys his wcrt and a variety of hobbies, a seeking a corrpati- 
bhSWF.4OS0.Adl.7047 

FOCUS HERE 
Advertunxa, Iriendry SWM, 4I,5 , H\ 175bs. wih Ight brown 
hak and blue ayes, who mpn hWng. caJTptog, and sports, is 
k»kMVtorwarttornoetingaSWF,urder46,whoB l aameeting 
i*w people. Adt.5294 

JUSTTHEWAYWEARE 
Advertuous, IrteBgert humorous SWPM. 36, ST, heavyset 
wih brown hak and green eyes, anjoyt the outdoors, nature, 
movies, and rnustumt. is ISO an Heleclutl corr-passtonala 
SF. 25-35. wth simiar Interests, to be himsel wih Adl 6874 

MUCH TO OFFER 
Adventurous, lakl-back SWPM, 4 1 5'H", 1 75bs , wth btondsh 
brown hair and btoe eyes, orv^s Ivim carrping. iraveing. ihe 
arts, and mora, is ISO a SWF, under 46, wth similar kterosis, 
tor cornpanionship. Adl. 4402 : 

COMFORTABLE WITH SELF 
Outgo tog. sports-rrinded SWM, 30. 6*, wth btond hak, grten 
eyas, and a goalee, who enjoys roacSng, biking, canptog, ind 
the OUdoors, is looking tor a SF. 24-35, wth snilar mtaresti. 
Ad* 7374 

TOTAL HONESTY 
GaWuTry empbyad, friendTy SWM. 44. 510*. 175bi. who b 
bokirfltoranacih^easyffwS>VF,l«wirtertravebandpos- 
sbie lasting reiaibnshb_ >S*.4707 

LETS BE CANDID... 
GainfuTy emptoyed, ihJs rrustachad SWM 45, ST, 158b*.. 
wth brown hatoaytaL torn invetgardarm 
lrvgoUW«toc^(wiSWT.30«.l»lrWshic,Adl.7253 

KIND-HEARTED 
Hat t rnveet, sirxin SAM 27, S^r, wthblack hu. who it bok- 
lor a krd, toying SAF. 18-tS, tot a possbH retationship 

LETS GO FISHING 
Srjoiuneous, tunny, emptoyed SWM, 53, ST, lSObs. wth 
rawing grey hak. mustache, and btoa tyes, who kket fishing, 
working ou, cydtog and mora. It ISO an honest arirfc taring 
SWF, 4055, who enjoys the same Adl.6531 

LOVE IS COLOR BUND . 
FrienrJy SBM, 40, 67. 220toi, seeks a special SiDWF,4058, 
who ervpys cSning out ouiot overlings, bng waks, (an muse, 
and hosaoack icing. AdTMia 

COMPUTER DUDE 
Furwy, luntoving SWM 45, 5*10*. 145trs., wih bng copper-col- 
orod hair. Ikes basebal, hockey, and skiing He's bokrig lor a 
SF, 3O60, wth the tame interests. Adl 5576 

TOTHE POINT 
SWM, 25, 5'U'. IGOta, NTS, who enjoys biking, moviaa and 
more, It boking tor an honest arnptoytd SWF. 1030. Adi.3832 

JUST AROUND THE CORNER . 
Musicarr/lnc*odSWM 1 315 , 11\210'rA.waniJtorm*laSF. 
1M5.wtv3er^t^v*i,goir^tolhoi)eacKandexpbringnew 

■ . HONESTY AMUST 

' Friendry. physkaJy ft SWM, 43, 5'(0*, tSSbl, who ikes oU- 
door activties , bng walks, dancing,' and good conversation Is 
MwluVvjawambrd-fi6arted,sirweSYirT ? Adl-9667 

CHECK IT OUT , 
Hat a kind, suxere SWM, 48, 5T. 17Sba.. wth bbnd hair and 
haiei tyaa. Is In search ol a caring, bvtog SWF. 30-50, - 
Ao*.3089 

HELLO LOVE 
Thb honest SHPM, 22, ST, ITOfot. wW) black hak, who enjoys 
muse, sporting time wth Iriends, bng drives and more, tt 
■seokirvjasixweSWF.2l-35,togoouia«1rMvttgoodtirne 
wth Adl 6600 



TALK TO Mc 

Carirvj, fiotovVvtOW dad of one, 20, 6"3*. »Ah red hair and 
btoe ayes, it ISO a SF, 1847. tor conversation and good 
timet Adf 8625 • ~" 

WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH 
Wlrry r Weri^^SWM.24,(y < 22X)toa,bbrvJwRhgreentm 
Hum most Bport*. especiaty eoccer. Ht't a CurJent bobng 
• toriSYvF,ovt*1"UrT«l.6779 

HIS HEARTS THE SIZE-. 
Of Taut HtTl • SWM S7. 5*11', ISObs, wth brown 
haxfeyet, who anjoyt Ilea mantels, weekend trips, the oU- 
doors and enknak Ha marry want to find t SWF. 3052. 
Adl,4972 - • 

LET THE OOODTIMES ROLL 

: Frienov hrrvtoving SHM, 22, 57. avenge bUU wth dark 

hair andlgN brown eyes,enmsNs work, sports, oining cU 

are5gptogcU,iiioekxvjti{r^orwaiiraar*teSWF,30 

wundtr'Adl.1476 

TOGETHERNESS 
He'iacaring SWdad.«,S1\2ato.whoer»^lisHng, 
playtog oof, and mora. Wa boktog tor a devoted, kwtog 
DVSW?. 2842. Kids okay. Adl. 3661 

FOCUS HERE 

owe eyea, wno ereoys garoenrig. country orwes, naong and 
t7av./abobngtomrM«upwthtsirv^Sf,u^55,for 
In^ndship first, maybe mora Ad*. 4560 

MAGIC 

,Thit hMtuVcoritelooa,.SWM, 48. 5*11', hat I'hoJstJc 

approach to He, end enjoyt the martial arts, bra waft*. 

NEW IN AREA 
Ojldboriy. totetigert SWPM, 40, b seokton an totwesitog. 
active SWPF. for a potable rtlatton^ Ad*363l 
COULD WORK OUT 

Vokjrtter work, classic ears, and his cogs keep this honest 
i SWM 64, SW. 150fc*, busy, bU N Till naedt to fkrdan 
rdrve.petieSWFtok)tohimlcVwallatorJwpartorarncrrvj 
data Adt 3323 ■ , 

NOW MEET THE BEST 
Outgoing, educated SWPCM, 50, 6*. 21 Ota., wth brown 
hair/eyes, rvys, who enjoys musb, the theater, taking wafts, 
rima, working out and const ruabn projects, b seeking a ft, 
ppoOnatunKTSWCF.3^60 ChUraflou7>dl.4»l9 

BLUE SKIES 
DW dad Of one, 29, 5'liros, 275b*. wth dark bbnd hak, 
blue eyes and a goeiee, who erwys motorcyefing, movies, 
rnusc,rxncertstndr*»rts.Ht50^S^.24-^.AfJ7933 

USTEN CLOSELY 
Handsome SWPM, 44. who enjoy* sports, togotog. movies 
andgc*.seeiuanoUgctoabeauilulSWF.3?4&tei.7355 

FREE WEEKENDS 
f3rttrvaytd btond SWM, 47. ST who anjoyt botitog. scuba 
[tWrtt'tToelmwTalDiBic l rtjw 
a-loaonaie SWF, 25-4* Adl 8730 ' 

SHY BY NATURE , 
OUtt humorout SWM, 22, 67, IBOta. wth dark har and 
hrual eyes, who enjoys tpt/tcfngjlme Wth iriends. foottaj 
and beach yoflrybel. is seeking a SWF, 2 1 -29, who can maka 
htnluigh. Adf. 9765 

A GOOD LISTENER 

SWM. 34, 5Y, 2l0bs, wth brown he* and btoe eyes, who 

enjoys dancinci iwvTvntog. saing and men, warts to meet 

. an outgoing, pette SWF. 2M6, tor fnenJshb 6nt AdfiSSO 

THE WIND IN YOUR HAIR 
fenrjbome, fit SWM, 40.57*. ITObt. who anjoyt working 
out, saam. morts can, moiarcyciru and more, is teektoga 
stabia. ecWurous SWF. 45 or ^undar. NrS.Adl.7663 

NOW MEET THE BEST 
Psfsonable SWPM, 56, 67,195b*. with dark hak/eyes, 
wants to meet an ettnetwe SWF, 3053, wth good ntoat, 
.who tntoyt travel, worttog oU and new experiencas. 

' WALKWTTH ME 

Fbmartc SWPM 43, 5*11*. wth tmwn hair art! fuel eyes, 
I desires a laauOM SWF. under 43, who also enjoyi horaa- 

. back nd»igfishrig,rnjsc,ptays and invekng Adi.445! 
TAKE A OEEP BREATH 
Fun SWM, 34 135toa. wth stnwbeny-btond hak tnd hart 
eyes, who enjoys basketbaJ, tootbai fahing chldren and 
bowtog. seeks a SWF, 30O4. Adl 82+0 
JUST YOU AND ME 
. Outgoing, caring SWPM, 55. ST. 160bi, wth sal and pep- 
per halt green eyes, who enjoys fishing, sports andmort.li* 
.- teaking a bving SWF. 60 or uroer. AdTlfflS 
MOVE QUICKLY 
This emptoyed. hr^cving. kind SWM. 36. 6". 220bs, wth 
drrtybtorvJrWandbk)apyej,isbokirfltorah^canngSF, 
25-42. Adt.9629 

MANY OPTIONS 
Ckw*vto-i»rthSWM52.6^*,270t^.erwpoingcUwilh 
mends, sports, dtotog ou and musfc. Ha kt tookntomtatan 
. -Mtygoing SWF. Adf 4060 . -. . 

y; . " - LETS GETTOGETHER ',',",..- 
Outgoing, employed SW dad ol one, 24, 6-4*.^4oWw»h- 
bbnd hak and btoa eyes, who enjoys wondrn on cars. 
movies, conversation, spendtog timo wkn his dauoMor. wafts 
on the beach, rrusic and mon. is seeking a ruviwngSWF. 
1IW7, who Bun kkH. Ad*J3» 

SELF-MOTWATED 
Ccrtdert SWPM, 4< e.l75btwwlh tmwn hak and btoe 
eyes, a US, enpy* gcltoo, exwdsing. tnveSng. queaty 
mowss. oanang snd country muse. He seeks a compatible, 
enenjetic SWF, 35-48, wth bng-range goals Adt.1391 

PURE MOTIVES 
An amusing SHM 20. 5T, of medtom buftt woukl tu to 
-. meet a JbetuTM nice SF. 18-22. tor a good rstatkyithp. 
ACU.559S 

KNOWS WHAT HE WANTS 
SWM. 27. 5T.235bi. wth brownhiiind preen tyes. who I 
enjoyi sports, wortuhg oU, bfttog. the ouloccrs and mora, 
wanri to most a nee. attractive SWF. 24-35 Ad* 9962 

ARE YOU A COUNTRY GIRL? 
Aderpertdab(« | hor»stSWdadofhw.37,5T, USbs.wih 
Ight brown hair and hazei eyes, Ban boabnq, bikina movies, 
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THE 
CUPBOARD 



John Phelps 



The HalF 

awaits 

Wapon 



It's been a great 49 years at 
Antioch Community High 
School for Steve Wapon. 
But who said it has to stop 
there! 

Wapon will be starting his 
50th year as a Sequoit coach lat- 
er this month when his Lady Se- 
quoits varsity girl's golf team 
drives into action. 

For his outstanding accom- 
plishments at ACHS, Wapon will 
be inducted into the Antioch 
Community High School Hall of 
Fame during halfiime of the Se- 
quolts first football game Satur- 
day, August 28 against Mukwon- 
ago, Wis. Game time, for the 
record, is slated for 1 p.m. 

Some of Wapon's former 
coaching accomplishments 
while at ACHS include garnering 
a 63-47 record as head football 
coach. 

During that span, Wapon's 
teams captured three North Sub- 
urban Conference titles to go 
along with two appearances in 
the I.H.S.A. State semifinals. 

Furthermore, Wapon 
achieved a four-year record of 
75-57 while at the helm of the 
Lady Sequoits varsity softball 
team. His Lady Sequoits earned 
one NSC title to accompany two 
regional crowns. 

And, getting back to golf, 
which is the only sport Wapon 
presently coaches, the Lady Se- 
quoits made their first sectional 
appearance last fall. 

Look out for the linksters, led 
by senior state qualifier Sara 
Groh, to make some major noise 
in not only the NSC but the 
county, for that matter. 

Now, ACHS would like to in- 
vite Wapon's former athletes to a 
reception in the high school 
cafeteria beginning at 10:30 a.m. 
on the 28th of this month. At 
that time, those wishing to at- 
tend the game will be able to 
purchase discounted individual 
or family tickets at that time. To 
attend the reception, please call 
(847) 395-1421, ext. 241 as to 
leave your name and the number 
of people in your party. 

And finally this week, I'd like 
to extend a big welcome to Rob 
Backus, who joins us fresh out of 
Warren High School. Rob joins 
the Lakeland staff as a part-time 
editorial assistant and will be 
primarily covering sports for 
your truly. 

From what I've seen in his 
work ethic and writing skills in 
this, his first week of action, Rob 
looks to have a great journalism 
career ahead of him and we are 
certainly glad to have him 
aboard! 

John Phelps can be reached at (847) 
223-8161, ext. 132; fax (847) 223- 
8810; or e-mail at edit@lnd.com. 




August 13, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers/ M 



Winged warriors running "on the edge" 



By MICHAEL H. BABICZ 
Community Editor 



Life on the edge. 

That is what sport of sprint car 
racing is for competitors and fans 
alike. 

Wilmot Speedway, a one-third 
mile clay oval on the Kenosha Coun- 
ty Fairgrounds in Wilmot, Wis., has 
become the nation's unofficial sprint 
car capital. 

Averaging 40 methanol alcohol- 
breathing, 800-plus horsepower un- 
predictable winged wonders, Wilmot 
has the highest weekly average car 
count of the estimated 100-plus 
tracks in the U.S. hosting these ma- 
chines. "Why it's so popular here 
more than in any other part of the 
country, I don't have a clue," said 
Andy Calln, Premier Racing Produc- 
tions, Inc. of Antioch promoter of 
Wilmot for the past five seasons. 

In that time, Wilmot has seen the 
class grow from six cars to its current 
average. At a June special, a track and 
Wisconsin state record 69 cars on 
hand. A July "King" event drew 62 cars. 

The appeal for drivers and spec- 
tators, according to Calin, is, "the 
speed and wildness. Racing on the 
ragged edge like no other short-track 
racing. All of the time, the car is on 
the edge." 

There is a lot of darting, inside, 
outside, to the top and bottom of the 
track. The "Indy cars of short track 
racing," as they are referred, are the 
most unpredictable and lightest 
kinds of racing machines seen at a 
local Saturday night program, in 
weight-power ratio, the cars at 
Wilmot are required to weigh a min- 
imum of 1550 pounds, Including the 
driver. With the weight similar to an 
Indianapolis or CART Champi- 
onship type-car, the sprint car 410 
cubic-inch engine puts out nearly 
the same horsepower, in the 800-850 
range. 

"For sure, it's the excitement, the 
thrill, unlike any other racingevent," 
Calin said. "It's controlled chaos." 

"I remember our first sprint car 
show, when we signed up witii a pro- 
moter named Van Patton," said re- 
tired Wilmot promoter Ray Toft, of 
Toft Auto Racing, Inc. in Antioch. . 

"It had to be over 20 years ago. 
We almost canceled because Van 
Patton didn't bring enough cars with 
him. Then we let some of our super- 
modifieds run to make it a show. It 
ended up pretty good ." 

Toft, with his wife, Joan, operat- 
ed the facility and were involved in it 
in one way or another since 1954. 
The Tofts turned the track over to 
their daughter, Debbie, and son-in- 
law, Andy Calin, in 1994. 

"As a group, the IRA(Interstates 
Racing Association), wanted to go to 




Park City's Kirk Fehrman (car 33), Rosalie's Tom Plltaver (car 2p), and Pewaukee.Wlsconsin's Todd 
Hepfner (car 28) do battle in 3-wlde racing action at Wilmot Speedway. Hepfner has won the last 
two star trac features at Wilmot. — Photos submitted by Mike Naplerala. 



full sprints with a direct drive," Toft 
recalled, noting the movement start- 
ed in the early 1980's. "Mainly, the 
drivers wanted to get away from 
starters, which we had on the super- 
mo difieds. This would allow them to 
compete in other sprint car shows." 

The original IRA charter filed in 
1968 has a board of directors includ- 
ing Toft, Whltey Harris, then of Lake 
Villa; Junior Dodd of Beach Park 
(Waukegan), Roger Otto of Burling- 
ton, Wis., Bill Bohn of Bristol, Wis., 
Ken Monroe of Genoa City (Pell 
Lake), Wis., and Fred Nielsen of Lake 
Villa. 

"For a long time, Wilmot was the 
only track around that ran sprint 
cars," Toft said. This season, Wilmot 
continues to be the only weekly Sat- 
urday sprint car program running 
from May through September. 

The only exception is due to a 
Kenosha County Fair Board decision 
discontinuing the extremely popular 
standing room only drawing Satur- 
day fair sprint car races in August. 

Over the years, Wilmot has host- 
ed its weekly Star Trac Outlaw 
Sprints, with special events featuring 
traveling groups. The United States 
Auto Club (USAC) nationally sanc- 
tioned winged and non-winged 
sprints, the Ohio-based All Star Cir- 
cuit of Champions and the Midwest- 
ern-regional based IRA Outlaw 
Sprints have had events. 

Toft began "the original open 
competition sprint car showdown," 
know simply as "The Wilmot Open" 
in 1980, which was not sanctioned by 
any organization for many years. 

During its truly open status, it 
drew many top sprint car drivers in 
the country. Among those were Dave 
Blaney, now in NASCAR Busch Se- 
ries; Danny Lasoskl of World of Out- 



laws(WO); retired Rick Ferkel of 
Ohio, one of the original "outlaws"; 
Indy Racing League champion and 
NASCAR Winston Cup driver Tony 
Stewart; and Jack Hewitt, winningest 
active USAC sprint car driver, to 
name a few. 

Over 90 percent of current WO 
competitors have competed at 
Wilmot over the years. 

"The Open" has had its share of 
"hometown" winners including Bill . 
"Kid" Kojis of Milwaukee, who won 
the first event in a thrilling last lap 
finish. Beach Park's Joe Kristan, still 
a regular at Wilmot, won in 1989. 

The "King of Wisconsin" Sprint 
Challenge has replaced the Open, 
with Joe Roe, 7-time IRA champion 
and past Wilmot titlist, the overall 
winner in 1997. Dave Moulis of . 
Johnsburg won the crown in 1998. 
Pleasant Prarie's Todd Daun cap- 
tured the crown this July. 

The IRA began using Wilmot as 
its home track, then decided to go 
on the road. Not all drivers wanted to 
travel. Following meetings with dri- 
vers, Toft implemented some cost- 
saving measures. Continued by 
Calin, the weight requirement, a 
spec right-rear McCreary tire and a 
certain exhaust header to cut down 
on horsepower a little, have stayed in 
effect 

These moves have been credited 
by promoter and competitor alike 
with keeping sprint car racing at 
Wilmot as affordable and popular as 
it has. "They're definitely moves In 
the right direction," agreed former 
Wilmot champion Gib Wiser of 
Neosho, now a car owner and crew 
chief. "It is keeping it competitive." 

"Our shows at Wilmot have 
proved to be better shows than trav- 
eling groups because they start the 



fast guys up front," Toft explained. 
"It used to be, years ago, the fastest 
guy started ail the way at the rear. 
The cars became too equal, and It 
was difficult for the faster guys to 
move up." 

"We used to have a eight or 10- 
car invert, based upon a pill the fast 
qualifier would draw," Toft said, not- 
ing a six-car compromise was 
reached, meaning the fast qualifier 
will start third row of the 20-car 
main. "It's a lot better race," Toft 
said of the invert "The little guy nev- 
er has a chance when the fast guys 
start up front. The shows are more 
competitive. There's a lot of new 
guys, and even a girl, at Wilmot They 
all need a place to start " 

"If It wasn't for Wilmot, they 
wouldn't have a place to get started," 
Toft said, referring to the likes of 
Roe, who calls Wilmot his "home 
track." 

Tim Cox of Park City, who trav- 
eled with USAC for a number of 
years finishing as high as third , got 
his start at Wilmot in non-winged 
Modified Racing Association (MRA) 
modifieds, graduating up to sprints 
where he earned rookie of the year at 
Wilmot before going with USAC. 
"The biggest thing about Wilmot, it's 
a pretty tricky track to get around be- 
cause of its unique shape," Cox ex- 
plained. "If you can get your car 
hooked up at Wilmot, you can run 
anywhere." 

"Biggest reason Wilmot Is so 
popular, there's no place you can 
go without driving 200 miles and 
run sprint cars," Cox said. "All of 
the horsepower, light-weighti- 
ness and quick response ap- 
pealed to me." 

Please see SPRINT CARS /All 



ACHS girls golf set to begin Monday 



Next Monday will mark the start 
of practice for the Antioch High 
School Varsity and JV girls golf teams 
at Spring Valley Golf Course in 
Salem, Wis., located on Tre. 83 three 
miles north of Antioch. 

Double-session practices during 
the first week will start at 7 a.m. and 



end at approximately 10 a.m., with 
the evening sessions beginning at 
6 p.m. In order to begin practice, 
each golfer must have a current 
physical exam on file, along with 
properly completed athletic 
clearance Form. 

Head coach Steve Wapon em- 



phasizes that "no experience is nec- 
essary. 

"Besides an outstanding varsity 
schedule, we have a full JV schedule 
of meets that will be helpful for our 
younger golfers," he said. 

Any girl interested in learning to 
play golf should plan to attend the 



practice sessions. There are also a 
limited number of starter golf club 
sets available for golfers to use 
during the season. Any parents 
and/or golfers interested may 
contact Antioch High School at 
(847) 395-1421, exi. 246, or attend 
practice Monday. 










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13, 1999 



SPORTS 



Lakeland Newspapers/ i\* 



led. 
test 
ear. 
dit 

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ie food drive for the Shalom 

In t e rf ai tl i Food Bank Is b cln g 

i extended at Premier Racing 

" >dudion's\Vllmot Speed* 

i to the rain out last week, the 
ly and The Original Outlet 
•extending the drive. Parties 
)p off canned and non-per- 
[jfood Items at The Original 
lall Information booth, 1-94 
[ghway 50, or at the Speedway 
rday, August 14, between the 
jofnoon-10:30p.m. 
Tren though its summertime, 
" ! still many people in need, 
i Kenosha County," said Andy 
[Wilmot Speedway promoter. 
Ueveryone-fans, competi- 
' members, and staff, to re- 
>er to bring their items this 

ie on-track action for the one- 
1 mile clay oval will feature 
m Towing of Kenosha Night 
i Midwest Sprint Association 360 
k- inch engine powered winged 
its, IMCA modirleds, IMCA hob- 
tocks, and Wisconsin Mini-, 
it Association motorcycle en- 
-powered winged mini-sprints. 
iThe program will feature twin 
flap main events for the IMCA 
)d ifieds as they are making up a 
stponed feature from August 1. 
For the latest weather updates, 
fane the trackside 24-hour race- 
Ses, 838-RACE or (414) 862-2446. 



LET'S GO 

RACING . 



a ■ 



i] 



Michael H.Babkz 



Wilmot Speedway will partici- 
pate in the Lindenfest Parade on Au- 
gust 14 and the Gumee Days parade 
on August 15. 

Coming up on Saturday, August 
21, will be the 2nd Annual WUmot 
Wing Ding at CapL Curt's Pub & 
Grill, located on Route 173 west of 
Antioch on Channel Lake. Race cars 
and stars will be available from 1-9 
p.m. 

Children's oriented activities will 
beheld throughout the afternoon, 
with hourly free door prizes given 
away between 2-6 p.m. There will be 
a 50/50 cash raffle and com 
roast/brat dinner available at a nom- 
inal cost Proceeds will benefit the 
Antloch Rescue Squad. 

Big Fun Entertainment of 
Grays! ake is providing the sound 
system and music for the afternoon, 
with a live disc jockey from 5-9 p.m. 
with dancing space available. 

The free program is being put to- 
gether by CapL Curt's, Curt Johnson, 
owner; Premier Racing Production's 
Wilmot Speedway, Andy Calin, pro- 
moter; Babicz Auto Racing Services, 



Mike Babicz promoter; Big Fun En- 
tertainment, Randy Cashmore, own- 
en and Jim's Budget Auto Sales. 

"This Is being done to provide 
the race fans and general public an 
opportunity to visit with the com- 
petitors who race regularly at 
WUmot Speedway, since for the first 
time in the 48-plus year history of 
the track, there wIU be no oval track 
racing during the county fair," said 
Calin. 

"This is an opportunity to see the 
cars and meet the stars," said John- 
son. 

The show will feature sprint cars, 
IMCA modifieds, mini-sprints, mini- 
modirleds, a nostalgia race car, 
among others. Antioch Rescue 
- Squad plans to have one of their 
units on hand. 

Lake Geneva Raceway managed 
to get its August 7 program in be- 
tween the rain drops. 

McHeniy*s Rick Corso scored the 
victory in the super stock feature, 
while the Antioch contingent was 
weU represented; Dan Huber fin- 
ished eighth, Todd Peterson won the 
semi-feature and a heat race, and, 
Tom Maid posted a victory in the 
other heat 

In the super late models, point 
leader Al SchlH of Franklin, Wis. won 
his. fourth feature of the season, while 
McHenry*s Joe Fisher was third and 
Park Cit/s Danny DameU fourth. 

Point leader Bob Koidahl set fast 



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After starting the season 0-4, The Lake Villa Mustang Cubs battled their way back into second place. 
IThe Cubs then capped off the season by winning the World Series. Above, the Mustang Cubs con- 
sist of, front row, from left, Adam Roesner, Andrew Lefler, Ross Morway, Kevin Kprecek, Robert 
toyles, and Michael Hayden. Second row, from left, is Malcolm Tracy, Brian Swanson, Brett We- 
>er, Joey Sagen, and Kevin Doetsch. Top row, from left, is manager Scott Swanson, coach Bill Mor- 
/ay, and coach Deidra Morway. —rSubmltted photo. . 



i nr. 



1FR0M PAGE Al 
PRINT 

IARS: Driver bio 

Toft recognizes moves to help 

fow buck guys compete," puts 

lem at a disadvantage If they run 

ith the likes of the WO. "They still 

in't compete with the Kinsers 

lark and Steve), Swindells (feffand 

immy) and Lasoski," Toft said. 

lose guys are professionals. That's 

lat they do for a iiving." 

■ Star Trac sprint car runners at 

ftlmot have regular jobs. Among 

ie professions are plumbers,. 

^inters, mechanics, business own- 

s, factory workers, contractors, to 

ime a few. Lisa Heywood of Rich- 

>nd, Antioch High School gradu- 

! and first-year sprint car corhpeti- 

is an insurance administrative 

itstarit. 

Sponsor dollars come from fam- 

friends, local business owners. 

)t major corporations like 'the big 

is. ,M We've always felt the more lo- 

peopleyou in the racing game, 

irtl in turn put more people In the 

ids because their friends and 

Ighbors will come to see them 



race," Toft said.'.. 

Toft arid Calin are In agreement, 
cost is going to be the major factor in 
whether sprint car racing continues 
to thrive at Wilmot, as well as 



throughout the country. "It's at a 
crossroa'ds," Calin said. ''It's to die 
point where the drivers can't be 
caught in the money equals speed is- 



sue. 



*■> 



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time and won the dash before taking 
the sport truck feature checkered 
flag. Lakeland-area drivers Included 
Grayslake's Chad Ross second, 
Woodstock's Chad Phillips third, 
and heat winner RJ. Ross of Gumee 
fifth. Woodstock's James Olson fin- 
ished sixth, Iibertyville's Curt Mat- 
son seventh, Wadsworth's Vincent 
Merry ninth, and Grayslake's Todd •* 
Ross 10th. 

Lake Geneva hosts stadium mo- 
tocross at 8 p.m. Friday, August 13. 
On me one-third mile paved oval on 
Saturday, August 14, will be super- 
late models, sportsman and super 
stocks at 7:30 p.m. A juniorfan club 
coin grab is planned. 

Frank Calabrese of Black Creek, 
Wis. won the Midwest Enduro Stock 
Car Series event in the group's first 
ever visit to LaSalle Speedway. Lib - 
ertyviile's John "Cuda Man" Poehler 
finished third both in the "A" class 
and overall. Gumee's Jay LeBrun 
placed sixth. 

The next local series event is 
Monday, Sept. 6 at Lake Geneva 
Raceway. 

Hales Comer's Speedway got its 
August 7 race program in with Tom 
Heybum first in the UMP late mod- 
els feature. Dan Sorce won his sixth 



sportsman main event, while Jim 
Zdroik took the modified checkered 
flag and Roger Lee won the Hales 
Whales main. 

Hales hosts the same four classes 
Saturday, August 14. On Friday, Au- 
gust 20 will be the final appearance 
of the season at Hales of the J&L 
Oil/United Expressllne Trailers In- 
terstate ItadngAssociatlontTRA) ' 
Outlaw Sprint Cars. 

Speaking of the IRA, Pleasant 
Prarie's Todd Daun won his second 
feature of the season August 6 In the 
traveling sprint warriors first ever 
appearance at Farmer City Raceway 
in central Illinois. Lake Villa's Ray- 
mond Heiisley won a heat race and 
finished seventh in the 'A' main. The 
Butler Speedway In Michigan August 
7 was canceled due to rain. The next 
IRA even ts will be August 20 at Hales 
Corners Speedway, a rescheduled . 
event Saturday, August 21 at Cedar 
Lake Speedway in Somerset, Wis. 
just east of Minneapolls-S L Paul, 
Minn, and Saturday, August 28 at 
Wilmot Speedway for the After The 
Fair Championships. 

Mike Babicz can be reached at (847) 
223-8161, ext 138; fax (847) 223- 
8810; or e-mail at edit@lnd.com. 



srfl 






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Above, second baseman Trevor Popp of The Antioch Ali-Stars kept 
the sticks going during a sixth Inning rally against Rochelle In the 
state tournament It was a taste of honey for the 10-year-olds, 
who took fifth In the Illinois State Tournament in Robinson. The 
all-stars competed against teams from Rochelle, Ridge Beverly, 
Watseka, and Tayloryille. Antioch defeated Rochelle 4-3 and Tay- 
lorvilfe 7-5 before being eliminated. Both victories were very 
close, with players in scoring position right down to the last out. 
This marked the first time a team from the Antioch Youth Base- 
ball has ever advanced to the state tournament. —Photo sub- 
mitted by Robin Jaranson. 




Gold Key 
Award 

presented to: 
Timothy Osmond, ac 



Timothy Osmond, cic, owner of Osmond Insurance 
Service, Ltd. in Antioch, Illinois, has been 
presented the Gold, Key Award by Pekin Life 
Insurance Company. This js the. 17th consecutive 
year that he has been the recipient of the Key 
Award. The Gold Key Award annually honors 
those individuals who display superiority in the 
sales of life and health insurance. We are proud 

that this agent represents Pckin Insurance in'scrving the people 

of this area. 




PEKIN UFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

Pekin, Illinois 

wwwp4klnlniurance.com 



VPEKINy 






A1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



August 13, 1999 




Senator Adeline 
Geo-Karis 

Representative •■ 
Susan Garrett 
Repiesentative 
Lauren Beth Gash 
Mayor Bill Durkin 
Dr. John Schulien 
Republican Chairman 

Senator Terry Link 
James Li Belle 
Like Gounty Board 
Chairman 
Angelo Kyle 
Judi Martini 
Larry Leafblad 
Al Westerman 
Audrey Nixon 
Loretta McCarley 
Robert Sabonjian 
Edward H. King 
Margaret L Meer.ir 
Dorothy Chin 
Nancy & Bill Duguid 
Dave Koukal 
Harry Henningsen 
Heather Cox 
Greg Hummel 
Liz Bennett 
Kay Vicle 
Lil Gofron 
DenLse Baehman 
George & Mat)' Ritzlin 
Don Joseph Regan 
James Hotham 
I'am Blickle 
Ron Ilerbig 
Meg Pucino 
Susan Kroncke 
Barbara Bancick 
Priscilla Humay 
Ronald R, Pieske 
Janet J. Leffelman 
Robert Alien Kuutler 
Frank Gauolin 
Scott & Caron Smith 
Jay Williams 
Lee Ann Limadrid 
Valerie Tliiele 
Detra Conley 
Richard Dmley 
Ada Wallrar 



Bhea White 


Sergio Arenas 


Margie Nftrnell 


Linda Williams 


Brad Rutland 


Judy May 


Roberto Villawuna 


Martin Cohn 


John B. Wells 


Essie Pftfer 


MaryShull 


Tina M. Durrani 


Larry Huml 


Wayne Ingram 


Beth Hoke 


Ralph Green 


Jack Shu!) 


GaryKleiss 


B. Alltop 


Eva J, Smith 


Doug Michelson 


Diann Dillard 


Desrie Colson 


Bob Powell ' 


Steve Herfoy 


Linda C, Ford 


Eric Scrammer 


Martha Martinez 


Virginia Bloomfield 


Mark Jacobs 


Kim Seymour 


Quinntel Owens 


E. Carol Johnson 


Sandra Triplet! 


Rick Copru 


Tony Gonzales 


Scott Johnson 


Mandy Conner 


Stanley Tomkovlch 


Rosevelt Mardetion 


Diane Leafblad 


Gary Funk 


Monteen Martins 


Jennifer Bauman 


Richard Mueller 


Barry Miller 


Kris Brown 


Diane Villatreal 


BillMichley 


Juan Ospina 


Evelyn Alexander 


John Christopher 


Todd Clark 


Don Roback 


Dan Aglidta 


Jose Luis Nieto 


Ovid K. Wong 


Charles Noll 


Darla Sulvinger 


Dorothy Baker 


Romel Cirillo 


Daphne Otero 


Greg Besler 


J. Pierce 


. ■ Tammy Bradbury 


Chris Hanzel 


Yotanda Carrillo 


Bernard Sautter 


Bobby Thompson" 


C Hawkins 


Eric Wilson 


Robert Sobos 


Mark Dieso 


Cheryl Tackett 


Evelynn Peterson 


Kirk Thompson 


Pal Vukovich 


Travis Morris 


Daniel Tyran 


Alex Franco 


Rev. Percy U Johnson, 


Pablo Menendez 


Clay Erickson 


Kimberly Aredia 


Jeff Brock 


Elaine Cassata 


Joe Beldine 


Andrew Bishop 


Linda Erickson 


Bill Noth 


Michate Luff 


Sidney Mays 


Jamal Theophilus 


Guy Norman 


Rich Lindas 


Jeff Powell 


Antonio Hernandez 


Mary Meicalf 


Sandy Flinchom 


Robert Ganet 


Cathy Williams 


Barry Miller 


Maria Hernandez 


Steve Kegin 


Peggy Cunningham 


Mike Burton 


Matthew J. Stephens 


Pal Hoppler 


Earl Mitchell 


Richard Locke, Jr. 


La Tanya Hill 


. Jim Buric 


Ellen Peterson 


Mylcs Sobczak 


Antonio Rosado 


. Carol Wilson 


Amanda Martin 


Jan Redner 


Michael Ralph 


Pamela Green 


Joanne Chamehnik 


Janet Tuhy 


Hattie Phelps 


Larry Studer 


Marcia Ralph 


Joe Wilcox 


Richard Chambernik 


Stephen Tuhy 


Johnnie Jemerson 


Rob Hunt 


Janet Lee . 


Henry Lozanno 


Margaret Mason 


Sandra A. Pinto 


James Patterson 


Joe James 


Kristin Hawkins 


Lyle Petersen ; 


Lisa Harris 


Roy Young 


Vem Johnson 


David Blumeastock 


Stephanie Becker 


Greg Wade 


Mark Rillz 


Bill Valko 


Paula Balentine 


Ron Jones 


Michael Word 


Carrie Pushee 


John Scudder 


Ted Leavitt 


Frank Spradlin 


M. Cingui 


Deni.se Globis 


Neil Duba 


Mark Orrillo 


Kenneth Sutherland 


John Meyer 


Dave Tag 


Tina Carlson 


M. Albertson 


Maria Carrillo 


Alan Staneur 


Carlton Williams 


Christine Stitt 


Keith Jackson 


Chris Erickson 


Bryant Jackson 


David Hoffman 


Marshall Lewis 


Susan Martin 


Deborah Jackson 


Mary Ann Wilcox 


Steve Reese 


Sarah Witbrod 


Michael Georgette 


Arline Harris 


Rita Melius 


John Diioba > 


Jack Weigel, Jr. 


Dorothy McDonald 


Rodney King 


Belinda Kish 


Patricia Shockley • 


Dennis. Northern 


Lucila Martinez 


Lorn Harvey 


Michael Shepherd 


Eric Petersen 


Lonnie Potter 


Rachel Northen 


Richard Bailey 


Sharon Heidemann 


James Adams 


Ken Arnold 


Art Salazor 


Robert Petersen 


Tina Woods 


Martha Rodriguez 


Ruth Watkins 


Jean Leach 


Dina Gargano 


Lynne Miller 


Jim Otterk 


April Steidl 


Willie C. Johason 


Becky Prentice 


John Zora 


Melissa Clark 


Rev. Charles Ramsey 


Karren Pratt 


Marc Watkins 


Paula Le Baron 


Patricia Bleck 


Linda Lanier. 


Debra Gwin 


Scott Ziegler 


Jamar L Smith 


Brian Scott 


Sam Williams 


Pattjeriah 


Jesus Martinez 


Barbara Morris 


William Jenkins 


John Pearson j 


. Anna Sydow . 


Ivan Bracic 


Rob Merletii 


Mary E. Graham 


Angie Warship 


James Anderson 


Doris Casey : 


Barbara Schwab 


Mandy Bjork 


Krisly White 


Laionia Bradley- 
Booker 


Roy Toybo 


Jeff Romeo 


Bill Shorts 


Rick Johason 


Bill Miteff 


Lace Milter 


Ben Touhy 


Alan Underwood 


Karl Grom 


Terry D. Barron 


Jones Yvette 


Virginia Bleck 


Emiliano Chapa 


Amberjones 


Belinda Schmidtbauer 


Charles B. Fitzgerald 


Cynthia Barrett 


James H oil ings worth 


Pat Siebert 


Steve Garrett 


Michael Setlerberg 


Courtney Holland 


Dana Banks 


Michelle Jones 


Jim Raskin 


Lauren Sobczak 


Cynthia Christeasen 


Randy Nelson 


Nathan Walker 


Laura Jansen 


John Tpuhy 


Meridee Richards 


Margaret Earnest 


Jerry Williamson 


Terrie Pye 

i 1 tr * - 


Cathy Miscenic 


Jamie Kueckler 


David Kranz 


Shari Dolaz 


Helen D. Hates 


Andre Hines 
Darlene Mason 

•■ * ■ m f 


Tom Shelley 


Leroy Kueckler 


Henry Tuohy 


Javier Sajuand 


Nancy Merlock 


William Aredia 


Tim May 


JoshHerion 


Luis Otero 


Annetta Williamson 


Kevin Johnson 


Tom Onan 


Jim Raskin 


Alex Jacobs 


Lee Maige 


Wadell Brooks 


Mary Walker 


Larry Pritcher 


Carrie Conn 


Dan Baldwin 



Pam Jacobs 
Wally Koch 
Tood Brooke 
Leo Borowskl 
Tom Holmes 
Shirley Friedlander 
John Lee 
Shelly Carlson 
TomLutz 
Joan Lutz. 
Don Petersen 
Norm Holmes 
Joe Arellano 
Ellen Keirnan 
MikcDrysdai 
Paiii May 
Maryjanks 
David Schwab 
Marty Sydow 
Karia Drundin 
Diann Drasler 
Amy Hetmkamp 
Marcia Conrad 
Dale Streicher 
Michelle Grom 
■ William Neuland 
Trudy Salinas 
Frank Mason 
Mark Glogovsly 
Natalie Lucas 
Peggy Shorts 
Lynn Morris 
Jim Webster 
Stephanie Jordan 
Stacey Jansen 
Evelyn Alexander 
Dan Young 
Kim Etolen 
Alan Richards 
Christine Mayworm 
Mikejansen 
Larry Traynoff 
Julie Dobrikan 
Mike Melius 
Jennifer Lind 
Jack Potter 
Tim Kenny 
John Ledman 
Ryan Burrhall 
Jim Dolinar 



John Etolensr 
JohnClobis 
Romina Kranz 
Lee Kenny 
Steve Fucoc 
Karen & Beih Petersen 
Tom Gearhart 
Diane Florlo 
Don Holmes 
PatSuohy 
Patrick Needham 
Robert Needham 
Wilson Tones 
Dan Friedlander 
Joann Murdock 
Kimberly Carson 
Kay Hurt 
Robert Revoy 
Shellt Milakovich 
Lawrence Wade 
Bernie Miks 
Gary Smith 
Tony Ellis 
Susan Zeldman 
Eileen Cothnell 
Susan Hart 
Ericka Morris 
Eric Lenz 
Florence Kohn 
Helen Earson 
Jill Pietschma 
Sarah Correa 
Lorna Collar 
Tammie Starke 
Jean Klinesmith - 
Sanely Dela Pena 
Chuck Dela Pena 
Holly Pendelton 
Diana Tippman ' 
Laurel Dietrich 
Debby Rose • 
JohriConarcy 
James Hood ■>■ 
James Rowe 
Angel Black 



Fight Traffic. Join the Crowd. 

Voice your support for the accessible, smart growth community- 
The redevelopment of Lakehurst Mall, Waukegan, to: 



Gov. George Ryan 
State of Illinois Building 
100 W. Randolph St. 
Chicago, IL 60601 
Fax: 312/814-5512 
E-mail: governor@state.il.us 

Lt. Gov. Corinne Wood 

State of Illinois Building 

100 W. Randolph St. 

Chicago, IL 60601 

Fax: 312/814-5228 

E-mail: ltgov@ccmailgw.state.il.us 



Dr, Keith Sanders, Executive Director 

Board of Higher Education 

4 W. Old Capitol Plaza, Room 500 

Springfield, IL 62701 

Fax: 217/782-8548 

Phone: 217/7.82-3442 

E-mail: sanders@ibhe.state.il.us 

Philip Rock 

Rock, Fusco & Garvey, Ltd. 

350 R LaSalle St. 

Chicago, IL 60610 

Fax: 312/464-3524 

E-mail: pjr@rock.fusco.com 



Please fax a copy to Martin Tuohy & Associates, Inc. at 847/549-7322 
On the Web at www.university-station.com 








999 



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113,1999 



COMMUNITY 



Lakeland Newspapers/ M 3 



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patrol 

i'e Lindenhurst Police Depart- 
ill be able to patrol linden 
regulating motor vehicle and 
ian traffic, as well as enforc- 
linances. The Illinois state 
calls for an agreement to be 
ined between the village and 
[aza owners for such enforce- 
' to be allowed since the plaza 
irty is technically private. Vll- 
Utorney Paul Phillips and Ad- 
hrator James Stevens explained 
such agreements with Water- 
[Commons, Falling Waters Con- 
inium Association can be ex- 
Fed in the hear future. By state 
(the agreements are In place for 
/here from 10 years, 20 years, to 
fears. The agreement has been 
irarded to the plaza merchants for 
lew. Once it is returned to the vil- 
board, it would be put Into ef- 



linance cleanup 

The Lindenhurst board did 
f me paperwork cleanup regarding 
ious village ordinances relating to 
[dewalks, driveways and landscap- 
ig. The board approved the 
langes, many of which were in legal 
mguage. 

"We're not bashful," said Mayor 

J aul Baumunk. "If there's a problem, 

let's correct it We became aware of a 

)roblem, so we corrected it. It was a 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 

NAME APPLICATION 
NAME OF BUSINESS: Bagels & More 
ADDRESS(ES) WHERE BUSINESS 
IS TO BE CONDUCTED OR TRANS- 
ACTED IN THIS COUNTY: 370S5 N. 
Highway 63. Lake Villa, IL 60046 (847) 
265-2300. 

NAME(S) AND POST OFFICE OR 
RESIDENCE ADDRESS(ES) OFTHE 
PERSON(S) OWNING, CONDUCT- 
ING OR TRANSACTING BUSI- 
NESSfTeresa Grote, 513 While Birch 
■ Rd.VLlhdenrnirsvlL" 60049 (847) 265- 
2470. Judith Fuller, 361 89 N. Hazel- - 
wood, Inglosido, IL 60041 (847) 546- 
0981. Lonnie Grote 513 White Birch 
Rd„ Lindenhurst, IL 60048 (847) 265- 
2470. Elmer Fuller, 36189 N. Hazel- 
wood. Ingleside, IL 60041. (647) 546- 
09B1. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS) 
COUNTY OF LAKE ) 

This Is to certify that the undersigned 
Intend (s) to conduct the above named 
business from the localio n (s) Indicated 
and that the true or real full name(s) of 
the person(s) owning,, conducting or 
transacting the business Is/are correct 
as shown. 

/s/Teresa Grote, July 23, 1 999 
/s/Judith Fuller. July 23, 1999 
/s/Lonnle Grote, July 23, 1999 
/s/Elmer Fuller, July 23, 1999 

The foregoing Instrument was ac- 
knowledged before me by. the per- 
son (s) Intending to conduct the busi- 
ness this 23rd day of July, 1999. 

OFFICIAL SEAL 

/$! Patricia A. Vukovich 

Notary Public 

Received: July 23, 1999 

Wiilard R. Helander 

Lake County Clerk 

0799E-2831-LV 

. July 30, 1999 

August 6, 1999 

August 13, 1999 



matter of clarifying some common 
sense issues," 

New flag 

Lindenhurst Police Chief Jack 
McKeever can finally have a real size 
United States flag in his office. 
Members of Lindenhurst Veterans 
of Foreign Wars Post 4891 became 
aware McKeever's flag was 6 Inches i 
high In his old office. The Post de- 
cided to donate a regulation size 
flag, with stand, to McKeever. May- 
or Paul Baumunk, original post; 
commander and active member; 
.Trustee Fred Messrher, post adju- 
: tant; Trustee Patrick Dunham, post 
commander; and DearCParkman, 
post quartermaster, presented the 
flag to McKeever. 

'"I appreciate the flag. Just like 
30 years ago, when man first went to 
the moon; the first symbolic act was 
placement of a flag. It's an extreme- 
ly important symbol and will be in a 
position of honor for all to see." 

Information freedom 

The Village of Lindenhurst, as a 
board and staff, has been and will 
.continue to comply with the free- 
dom of information act instituted by 
the State of Illinois. Mayor Paul Bau- 
munk praised the staff and board for. 
its previous compliance with Infor- 
mation requests from the public and 
the media In a quick and complete 
manner. Trustee James Betustak ex- 
pressed concern when hearing of 
other governmental bodies, such as 
the sheriffs department, being cited 
for non-compliance. "It's disheart- 
ening," Betustak said. "We want to 
try and continue to support any re- 
quests. If there are any problems, we 
want them to come forward to the 
mayor and the board so they can be. 
resolved/.' Baumunk concluded. 

■ 

Bug spraying 

' Llndenfest goers will may less 
little critters'to deal with. Trustee 
Ken Czyzewicz, who doubles as Lln- 
denfest chairman, announced plans 
for three mosquito sprayings along 
with a special spraying Saturday 
morning prior to the starting of the 
days activities to help alleviate flies 
as well. 

"There may be human flies, but 
hopefully not the insect type," 
Czyzewicz added. , 



Signs of the times 

GM. Signs markets some of today's biggest names 



By ANGELA D. SYKORA 
Staff Reporter 



Ever wonder what goes on in 
that big building behind the high 
school at 704 Sunset Drive? Like 
the Willy Wonka Chocolate Facto- 
ry, people are hard at work in there 
making some pretty cool stuff. 

G.M. Sign, Inc. has been in 
business for 28 years in Round Lake 
as a wholesale company to, the 
trade. They manufacture every 
kind of sign imaginable for other 
sign companies who then install 
and maintenance them for clients 
big and small. 

In their 30,000 square foot fac- 
tory they have produced one-of-a- 
kind signs through the magic of 
computer design technology, and 
have manufactured signs for some 
very well-known chain businesses 
such as Dunkln* Donuts, Brown's 
Chicken & Pasta, Lone Star Steak- 
house, Hallmark and TJ. Maxx— 
just to name a few. They also man- 
ufactured signs for Planet Holly- 
wood in Chicago and the "Wel- 
come to Chicago" sign at O'Hare 
airport 

G.M. Signs, Inc. was founded in 
1971 by the late George Matlasek, 
Sr. After he passed away in 1981, his 
daughter Beverly Kelly and son 
George Matiasek Jr., took over the 
family business and have been 
keeping it strong ever since with 
approximately $3 million in sales 
this year. 

Business is word-of-mouth. 

"We don't advertise," said Ma- 
. tiasek Jr., who handles all sales for 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
Double E. Soil Storage will sell the 
goods for non-payment from Unit #64 • 
Autotronlx, consisting of office sup- 
plies, filing cabinets, stainless steel 
equipment, Pasta King Cooker etc. 
Sale will take place at 676 Anita Ave. 
Antloch, IL at 10:00 a.m. Aug. -21, 
1999. 

0899B-2855-AN 
August 13, 1999 
August 20, 1999 



the company. 

With over 350 customers, he 
said the demand for signs is in- 
credible, "We can't do them quick 
enough." 

General Foreman Dan Blanton, 
who has worked at G.M. Signs, Inc. 
for 13 years, admits that it can get 
"rather hectic at times." 

"It's difficult to keep up, but it's 
always a challenge, " Blanton said. 
"We do a lot of overtime." 

Fifty-one employees work In 
different departments in the factor 
ry where signs are made mostly 
from metals like stainless steel, alu- 
minum, brass, copper and bronze. 
Materials are cut in-house at the 
design stations. All metal scraps 
are recycled. 

In 1986, the company acquired 
Ekonamy Sign, Inc. to broaden 
their neon manufacturing capabil- 
ities. 

Co-owner Kelly handles fi- 
nances for the company and says 
what she likes best about the busi- 
ness is "the variety and the core 
group of people with us." 

j "It's hard to And quality people 
in the sign business," said Kelly. 

Matiasek agrees that "quality 
makes us successful." He admits 
work like this cannot be done with- 
out dedication, which their em- 
ployees have a great deal of. 



G.M. Sign, Inc. is now hiring 
neon trainees and sheet metal 
workers. For more Information, 
contact the personnel department 
at 546-0424. 




Beverly Kelly shows one of the 
signs made at GM Signs, Inc., 
the sign manufacturing busi- 
ness her family has owned for 
28 years, in Round Lake. — 
Photo by Sandy Bressner 



to give us HOT NEWS TIPS 

call Lakeland Newspapers at 223-8073 

You can leave your name and number or remain anonymous. 
Leave a message and we'll check it out! 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
To the legal voters, residents of the Town of Lake Villa in the County of Lake and 
Stale of Illinois, that a Special Town Meeting of said Town will lake place on August 
'24, 1999 at the hour of 7:00 o'clock PM at Lake Villa Township Office, 37908 N. Fair- 
field Rd.. Lake villa, IL 60046. 

The purpose of said meeting Is as follows: 

1. The proposed 'disposal' of the Verona Park Property by the Lake Villa 
Township Board. 

2 . A revi ew of Township finances. 

3. Township Board plans for acquisition of land. 
Dated August 9, 1999 




Receive One $2.00 Automatic 



Deluxe Wash & Polish 

(Regular $4.50 Value) 



This Friday, Aug. 1 3th through Sun., August 1 5th 

8 am - 5 pm 
While attendant on duty. Weather permitting. 



760 Magnolia Dr. • Gurnee 
(Across from Speedway) 




/s/Lynn Hoffmann 

Town Clerk 

0899 B- 286 1-LV 

August 13, 1999 





KariiiKovell 

Account Executive, 14 Years of Experience 

Serving Antloch, Lake Villa, Lindenhurst 
& Wisconsin 

PHONE (847) 223-8161, ext. 105 
PAGER (847) 237-0611 

Favorite Part of the Job: 

The Creativity Of Designing Effective Ad 
Campaigns That Produce Results 



\tokiiig Ni'^s In Vnur (\omiiUinilv 



Thomas Kinkadr 





Limited Edition 
Canvas & Paper 
Lithographs 
exceptionally capture 
the luminous quality 
and. romantic beauty 
of Thomas Kinkade 
works of arts. 



"Mountain Majesty" 
Beginning of a Perfect Day III 



For more Information, please contact this 
Thomas Kinkade Premier Dealer: 



455 W Lake St. 
■Antioch, IL 60002 



Home Accents 

Gallery ^r 1-888-78-UOME-8 

Email -info@hannahs.com 
Web - \vww.hsuiriahs\cbm 



m 




A14 I Jxikeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



August 13, 1999 



Magic man 

Hypnotist brings power of suggestion to Gurnee Days 



By KORRINA GROM 
and ANGELA SYKORA 
Staff Reporters 



You could be a star on the 
stage during Gurnee Days. 
. , or a sumo wrestler, or 
possibly even an alien 
from another planet. 

All of these things will be possi- 
ble when hypnotist Christopher 
Carter takes the stage in Viking Park 
on Aug. 14 at 2:15 p.m. Carter, who 
has been hypnotizing people pro- 
fessionally for nine years, will per- 
form his hour-long "Mindscape" 
show as part of the Gurnee Days 
festivities. 

Carter's interest in hypnosis 
was first sparked while he was in 
high school, when he went on stage 
as a volunteer during a show. 

"I didn't remember anything 
that happened," said Carter, 

Shortly thereafter, Carter, a 
resident of Des Plaines, approached 
his psychology teacher and ex- 
pressed his interest in learning 
about hypnosis. He checked out 
books from the library and followed 
up his interest in college, when he 
studied psychology and theater at 
Illinois Wesleyan University. 

When Carter was studying the- 
ater at the University of Michigan, 
he decided that he could incorpo- 
rate hypnotism and theater into 
one program. "Mindscape," 
Carter's current program, was bom. 

Carter's interest in hypnotism 
has led to a busy travel schedule, 



during which he visits approxi- 
mately 140 college campuses each 
year. He also performs at high 
school graduation events, corporate 
outings and festivals. He Is sched- 
uled to perform between 200 and 
250 shows this year. Carter's 
Gurnee Days performance will be 
his last show at a festival for this 
year. 

Visitors to Gurnee Days will 
have the opportunity to participate 
in Carter's program. In a matter of 
minutes, or possibly seconds, a par- 
ticipant can be hypnotized. 

"There is a myth that one has 
to 'believe' in hypnosis in order to 
be hypnotized," said Carter. "To 
me, that is like saying you have to 
believe in gravity in order to be 
stuck to the Earth. The existence of 
hypnosis is well established in sci- 
entific literature. While it is true that 
a person cannot be hypnotized 
against his or her will, a person can 
be skeptical of the existence of a 
hypnotic state and still be a perfect 
hypnosis subject." 

"All that is required is that a 
person have a sincere and honest 
interest in being hypnotized, and be 
willing to follow the proper proce- 
dure," Carter added. 

The proper procedure, Carter 
said, is having the person focus on 
his or her imagination and getting 
the intellect portion out of the way. 

"The imagination part Is on 
auto-pilot," said Carter, "I'm like a 
tour guide. [Being hypnotized] has 
nothing to do with will." 



While a person is in the hypno- 
tized stage, Carter will have them 
do a variety of things. He will have 
them act as sumo wrestlers, aliens, 
deep sea fishermen and even a 
bodyguard. He added that partici- 
pants are not made to reveal per- 
sonal information or secrets during 
the course of the show. 

The most Important part of the 
show, of course, is suggestibility, 
like during hypnosis, the power of 
suggestion can be seen in everyday 
life. The contagious yawn is a prime 
example. If one person yawns, oth- 
ers begin to yawn. Carter said the 
same effect can be seen if a person 
walks into a neutral-temperature 
room and mentions that it is begin- 
ning to feel cold in the room. Others 
may begin to sense the coldness as 
well even though the temperature 
has not changed. 

"In their mind, they're going to 
create that sense of being cold," 
said Carter. The same effect hap- 
pens with hypnosis. Carter will of- 
ten give a person or a group of peo- 
ple a code word. When the code 
word is said, the person or group 
will react in certain way. 

If the person is faking the hyp- 
notic state, however, the effects will 
not be truly spontaneous. 

"With a faker, you can see the 
wheels turning in his mind," said 
Carter. 

During the course of the show, 
Carter checks for certain physiolog- 
ical indicators, including rapid eye 
movement (REM). If the indicators • 




Hypnotist Christopher Carter will perform his act In Viking Park at 
2:15 p.m. Aug. 14 as part of Gurnee Days.— Photo by Sandy 
Bressner 



are not there, Carter will ask the 
person to wake up and then invite 
him or her to leave the stage. 

"They're not as funny," said « 
Carter, citing that the spontaneity of 
the truly-hypnotized is the most en- 
tertaining. 

As a parting gift, Carter often 
tells the participants that they will 
feel like they've been sleeping for • 
eight hours. 

"They have a relaxed sense of 
alertness," said Carter. "It's not like 
a caffeine buzz;" 

When they are finished, partici- 
pants have had a good time. 



"It's a kick," said Carter. "You 
can't imagine how fun it is to do." 

Carter said his shows are safe, 
with spotters behind the partici- 
pants. He never makes participants 
do demeaning things or things that 
will be extremely embarrassing. 

"I just don't see the point In 
making someone look bad," said 
Carter. "I'm the nice guy of hypno- 
tism." 

Carter will perform his "Mind- 
scape" show from 2:15 until 3:15 
p.m. at Viking Park on Aug. 14. The 
show is free to the public. 

. . 







Do You Have An Interest In 

Antique Cars? 

If So, Mark Your Calendar For An 

Antique Car Show & 
Ice Cream Social 

In celebration of . 

Good Shepherd Hospital's 
20th Anniversary 




- — 



on 






August 14, 1999 - lO am to 4 pm 

Good Shepherd Hospital 

45© We Highway 22 in Harrington 

** Featuring 1979 Passenger Cars (The Year Good Shepherd Hospital Opened) ** 

For information, call the Barrington Historical Society Events Hotline at (847) 381-6855 
$5 Admission Fee on day of event for persons over 12 yrs. of age (12 years and under are free) 
Persons with special needs should call the Special Events Hotline two weeks in advance of the event. 

Good Shepherd Hospital 

w^ Advocate Proceeds benefit the Barrington Historical Society & the Wellness Place 




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it 13, 1999 



COMMUNITY 



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A1 6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



August 13, 1999 





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VACATION 



/ Lakeland Newspapers 



August 20, 1999 



feekend in the Dells 



reasure Island. Wow. One 
of Wisconsin Dells' flag- 
ship hotels certainly 
makes you feel like you are 
icatlon. 
|My wife, two children (boys 
i nine and 11) and I took a 
se-day weekend to the Dells ear- 
' this month and felt like we 



spent an entire week. It started with 
luxurious accommodations at the 
aforementioned hotel, which sports 
a new 50,000 square-foot indoor 
water complex complete with four 
water slides, a lazy river and child 
play area For those who know how 
big an acre is, this facility is bigger. 
The rooms are huge, 15 feet by 











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Jordan, 9 and Scott Tucker, 11, become part of the scenery at the 
Nanchafc £lkiRanc h 8 mites west of .Wisconsin Pells. A real work- 
ing farmrffie^anch began grvlrig^wnrthls year 



. 



40 feet, and clean. A night's stay in- 
cludes use of the indoor water park 
as well as the outdoor Family Land 
water park. Gas-powered bumper 
boats were a highlight to the out- 
door park. 

From there It was onto Pirates 
Cove, a challenging mini golf com- 
plex with five course levels of diffi- 
culty, Adventure Golf gives the 
same experience and tacks on a wa- 
ter log ride to booL 

Serpent Safari, located across 
from Noah's Ark, is an opportunity 
to see rare animals up close and 
personal. Thelma, a 41-year-old 
African tortoise, greeted us at the 
door. Inside are rare albino animals 
as well as a hideous snapping turtle 
that could be as much as 100 years 
old. Paul, one of the owners who 
also spent time at Gumee Mills 
when they opened a store there, is 
very friendly and knowledgeable. 

Of course, the food is a major 
part of any vacation and the Dells 
has much to offer the palette. The 
family favorite was Mr. Pancake 
• where they serve 16 pancakes for 
just over $5. They are delicious, and 
you will riot eat them all. Other no- 
tables on the weekend were Thun- 
der Valley Inn, an old farmhouse/ B 
&B with homemade jellies, flours 
and other foods from scratch; Black 
Bart's Stagecoach Buffet, and an old 
converted garage known as Pizza 
Pumphouse and Brewery. 

Other stops on the itinerary in- 
~ eluded Tommy Bartlett's Thrill 

Show (a great time) , Tommy 
, ...Baitiea^oJRsJt^Ylforld, Wax Muse- 



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Neal Tucker tries not to lose his head while visiting the Rick Wilcox 
Theatre of Illusion in Wisconsin Dells. New this year, Wilcox and 
his wife, Suzan, engage the audience in a splendid display of vi- 
sual trickery. 



urn of the Stars, and Ripley's Believe 
It or NoL Some of the things in Rip- 
ley's absolutely must be seen to be 
believed. 

Kid favorite: Laser Storm. My . 
.wife and I teamed up against the 
boys for an all out assault of laser 
tag. Though we'd never done ft be- "i 
fore, the boys were immediate ex- 
perts and were shooting us from 
every nook and cranny in the dark- 
ened game room. Mom was a sta- 
tionery target who might as well 
have had cross hairs painted on her.' 
It was all I could do to overcome the 
barrage from the youth. But, in the 
end, the parents were victorious 48 
hits to 32. 

Mom favorite: Nanchas Elk 
Ranch. It is a real working farm 
eight miles west of town, which 
evolved into giving tours just this 
year because so many people were 
stopping by the roadside to take 
pictures and asking questions about 
the majestic animals. 

Dad favorite: Rick Wilcox The- 
atre of Illusion, new this year. Laser 
Storm was an all out blast but I will' 
have a lasting impression of the 
charm of the Rick Wilcox magic 
show. It was the first magic show I 
had seen live and though I knew 
everything was an illusion, I just 
couldn't believe my eyes. 

The performance is awe inspir- . 
ing, humorous and slick while at the 
same time It gives you a down home 
feeling. Rick Wilcox does an excel- 
lent job of engaging the audience 
for the entire hour and 45 minutes. 

In fact, yours truly had his neck 



on the line as part of the guillotine 
Illusion. My participation came af- 
ter watching a carrot cleanly sliced 
In two by the device. The two car- 
. » rols.pl aced to both sides of my neck 
"did hot fare well either as they end- 
ed up on the cutting room floor. 

: When Wilcox asked ff anybody 
had heart problems my hand was 
, the first to go up. I swear, to you, I 
still don't know how the trick works 
but I am glad it did. 

Wilcox, along with his lovely 
\ wife and assistant, Suzan, traveled 
for years while perfecting their craft 
before achieving their dream of 
- starting a theater of their own and 
essentially a permanent place to 
hang their hat at the same time. 

New to the Dells, Wilcox and his 
wife have me secretly pulling for 
them to succeed much like a hard- 
working couple who starts a restau- 
rant from the ground up. It was tru- 
ly a wonderful experience. 

Though we were only gone 
three days, it seemed like we had an 
entire week's vacation. And after 
visiting the east coast earlier this 
summer, it was a nice contrast to re- 
ceive the warm hospitality that was 
virtually everywhere we went in the 
Dells. The remarkable thing to note 
was all our fun came without visit- 
ing Big Chief Go Carts or Noah's 
Ark water park. — by Neal Tucker 

Lakeland Newspapers and its 
readers want to hear about your va- 
cation. Write us a letter or e-mail us 
at edit@lnd.com. Submitted color 
photos are also welcome. 



Money tips for travelers 



Well-versed in the safety of travel- 
ers' checks, most travelers are less 
aware of money tips that can save 
time and trouble on the road, espe- 
cially if you venture abroad. 

• Carry your money in a different 
place than your I.D. In the unfortu- 
nate instance that you are robbed, 
they will not get your identification. 
Also, keep enough money for cab 
fare back to the hotel in another lo- 
cation. 

•When leaving a country, most ex- 
change houses will only take bills: If 
you have coins, use them to pay for 
your hotel room and place the bal- 
ance on a credit card. 



• Be sure to have several ways to 
access your money. Specifically, 
travelers' checks, an ATM card and 
credit cards. But be careful, If your 
PIN number is more than four digits, 
many foreign machines will not ac- 
cept It. 

• When paying for anything in a 
foreign country, always count your 
money out loud to your waiter, 
cashier or whomever. 

• Place a thick rubber band 
. around your wallet. The friction of 
the rubber band against the material 
of your slacks or coat will ensure that 
you will feel if someone is picking 
your pocket. 



B8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



HOT SPOTS 




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August 20, 1999 



August 20, 1999 




Lakeland Newspapers/ B9 



! ADVERTISEMENT 



POTLIGHT: 






Tang's Chinese Restaurant 




Location: 

111 S. Hwy. 45, Schoolhouje Plaza, Grayslake: ' 

Telephone: 
(847) 548-8882 

Hours: 

Open seven days a week: Monday to Thursday, 1 1 :30 a.m. to 9 pm 

Friday and Saturday, 11:30 a.m, to 10 p.m., Sunday, 2:30 to 9 p.m. 

Menu: 

Dinc-in, carry-out and delivery. 

Finest Chinese cuisine served in the area 







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Tang's Chinese-Restaurant is celebrating the 
start of its fourth year in business and now 
there is no doubt that it- is the most popular 
Chinese Restaurant in Lake County. 

Owner Peter Tang has had the goal of offering 
the best Chinese dining focusing on freshness, 
quality food, service and the most value for the 
money without compromises. This increase in 
popularity has insured that Tang's staff is working 
harder to please their many customers, offering 
the best service possible. 

Tang wants to thank all the loyal, customers 
that come from all over the county and as far 
away as Milwaukee, Wis. 

Tang is presently busy working to come up 
with many new authentic Chinese dishes to 
add to his fantastic menu, with added bar 
items as well. 

Tang's spacious dining room is available for 
private parties, seating up to 70 people. Make 
your reservations early so that you and your 
guests can experience the adventure of dining 
on Tang's delicious Chinese cuisine together. 

Tang's is open seven days a week, Monday 
through Thursday, from 1 1:30 a. m:« to 9 p.m., 
Friday and Saturday from 1 1 :30 a.m. to 10 
p.m. and Sunday, from 2:30 to 9 p.m. Dine-in, 
carry-out or delivery available. Call today at 
(847)548-8882. B) j 

> Tang's Chinese Restaurant is easily accessi- j 
ble, located at 111 S. Hwy. 45 in the 
Schoolhouse Plaza, in Grayslake. There is 
plenty of free parking in front of the restaurant. 





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B10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



SUMMER HOME & GARDEN 



August 20, 1999 




SUMMER 




L 

C 
th 




Eight reasons why trees die 



Accidents, automobiles, storms and even 
lawnmowers can cause bark damage and 
wounds on trees. One can avoid tree wound- 
ing by planting them in sheltered locations or 
by providing some sort of barrier. Be very 
careful while using lawn mowers and weed 
trimmers, as careless use can damage in- 
curred during heavy storms, and treat It 
promptly. Remember, the integrity and stabil- 
ity of a tree changes over time. 

Too Much Herbicide. When used proper- 
ly, chemicals can benefit trees and their 
growth. Improperly used, herbicides can in- 
teract with the roots and damage the tree's 
health. Make sure the Instructions for appli- 
cation are carefully followed. Seek profession- 
al help whenever you are not sure. 



Soil Compaction. This is a slow tree dam- 
age process, often with few or no other signs 
of the cause. In compacted soil, pore space 
has been reduced and roots do not get 
enough oxygen. Often the tree slowly declines 
and dies. Soil compaction can be avoided by 
aerating the soil, by mulching and by prevent- 
ing soil disruption around trees on construe- 
tkm sites. 

Bad Planting. Planting is one of the most 
important processes to ensure the tree's 
health and longevity. Make sure the planting 
hole is two to three times wider but no deeper 
than the tree's root ball. Plant trees promptly 
and make sure they get adequate water so 
that roots do not dry. 

Watering. Both over - and under-water 




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3 Gallon 
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$19 95 



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40960 Mill Creek Rd. Wadsworth 

(847) 838-0501 

SUMMER HOURS: Moii.-Sal. 7 am - 5 pm; Closed Sunday 

Directions to Mill Creek Nursery: 41 North to Kit*. 17!i (Rosecruns) 
West to (1st Intersection) Mill Creek ltd,, Left on gravel road 1/2 mile to Nursery Sign. 



can be harmful for trees. Watering is criti- 
cal for all trees in dry spells as well as 
young or newly transplanted trees. Moni- 
toring the soil moisture is one of the best 
ways of making sure that adequate water 
is provided. 

Location, Location, Location. Trees need 
proper sunlight and should be appropriate 
for the climactic conditions, or plant hardi- 
ness zone, of the area. Visualize the actual 
height the tree could reach and make sure 
there are no power lines in its path and the 
tree is a good distance from the house, other 
structures and other plants. 

PaintingTree Wounds and Filling Cavities 
and Concrete. Paint on tree wounds will actu- 
ally trap moisture in the wood, increasing the 
chances of decay. If you want to paint a 
wound for cosmetic reasons, use a very thin 
coating of wound dressing. Trunk cavities 
filled with cement make the tree unusually 
rlgid.which can restrict the tree's movement 
in high winds and leave the upper portion of 
the canopy to bear the brunt of the force. 
Improper Pruning. Pruning should follow 



standards established in ANSI A300, pub- 
lished by the American National Standards 
Institute. Proper pruning is a tree health treat- 
ment, but one of the most neglected tree care 
practices. 

Have a professional arborist evaluate 
your trees. This will help you determine po- 
tential weaknesses and dangers. Ask the ar- 
borist to look for stress cracks, weak branches 
and other subtle indicators of potential haz- 
ards. Check the tree for dead or partially at- 
tached limbs hung up in higher branches that 
could fall and cause damage or Injury during 
a storm. 

For a list of professional arborists in your 
area, or to get information on the care and 
maintenance of trees, contact the National 
Arborist Association, 1-800-733-2622 or by a 
zip code search on the NAA's Web site: 
WWW.NATLARB.COM. The NAA is a 60-year- 
old public and professional resource on trees 
and arboriculture. Its more than 2,300 mem- 
bers all recognize stringent safety and perfor- 
mance standards, and are required to carry li- 
ability insurance. 



Your best bets for critter control 



Americans spend moro than $22 billion 

annually on gardening Items. That's money 
well-spent, according to the National Gar- 
dening Association, which says a carefully 
crafted landscape can add an average of 15 
percent to the value of a home. However, 
there are threats to this investment — and 
they're as cute as your neighbor's dogs and 
cats. 

The damage to landscaping by animals 
can be costly. It's important to combat the 
problem in the early stages. Homeowners 
often fail to assess the damage until a nibble 
or unearthed plant leads to total defoliation. 
Use of repellents is just one way to make 
your yard and garden less appealing to ani- 
mals, say lawn and garden experts at Securi- 
ty Products Co., maker of the Repel® line of 
odor- and taste-based animal repellents. 

The company offers the following tips to 
keep your landscape vandal-free: 

• Select an odor-based repellent that 
causes temporary nasal discomfort in ani- 
mals. That drives them from the treated 
area. Some odor-based "repellents" are odor 
maskers, which only disguise previous odor 
markings left by dogs and cats and do not 
deter foraging animals. 

• Repel does not harm animals. It can be 
applied as a perimeter treatment around the 
area you want to protect. In this fashion, it 
can be used to train your own pet to stay out 
of certain areas of the yard. 

• Taste-based repellents can be good 
companions to odor-based repellents, be- 
cause they leave bitter residue that most an- 
imals dislike. Look for a repellent, like Repel, 
that contains Bitrex. 

• Stray dogs usually damage lawns and 
street-facing flower beds during the day, 
while cats are notorious for nighttime strolls 
through flower and shrub beds. Wild ani- 



mals prefer to forage at night and ara at-, 

'traded to tender garden vegetables arid'or- 
namental plants. This sort of damage is easy 
to spot, since deer and rabbit browsing 
leaves jagged and torn surfaces on twigs and 
stems. 

• Most homeowners opt against fencing, 
citing expense and aesthetics. Animal ac- 
tivists caution that some types of fencing, 
like barbed wire, can be deadly to deer. 
Fencing meant to keep out wild animals 
should be at least 6-1/2 feet tail and buried 1 
foot underground to thwart deer and small- 
er, burrowing animals. 

• Scare tactics can be a second line of 
defense. Scarecrows can simulate people if 
moved weekly to different positions and 
covered with worn — not washed — cloth- 
ing. Making scarecrows can be a fun project 
for the whole family. 

• Some gardeners and serious yard en- 
thusiasts buy expensive ultrasonic or 
electronic devices that use high-frequen- 
cy sounds to ward off animals. Experts ad- 
vise you to save your money. Anecdotal 
testimonials aside, there is no hard evi- 
dence that these devices alter animal be- 
havior. 

• Homemade repellents, like human 
hair, ground cayenne pepper, mothballs 
and blood meal, have been touted by 
home gardeners for generations. Unfortu- 
nately, the few controlled studies that 
have been done failed to demonstrate the 
effectiveness of these homespun solu- 
tions. While some are harmless, others, 
like mothballs, have potentially lethal 
consequences when ingested by inquisi- 
tive toddlers or pets. Look for commer- 
cially prepared products, like Repel Bye 
Deer™, that guarantee customer satisfac- 
tion or offer a money-back guarantee. 



Planting and forcing spring bulbs 



Autumn is just around the corner and 
that means it's time to plant spring flowering 
bulbs outdoors. Mid-September to early Oc- 
tober is the ideal time to plant all those won- 
derful bulbs which will Mil our spring and 
flowers. In a program entitled "Planting and 
Forcing Spring Bulbs" offered through Uni- 
versity of Illinois Extension, horticulturist 
Sharon Yiesla will discuss selecting, planting 
and caring for spring bulbs. 

The program will be presented on Tues- 
day, August 24, from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Ex- 



tension office located at 100 South U.S. 
Hwy. 45 in Grayslake. A slide presentation 
will feature a number of bulbs suitable for 
northern Illinois. Ms. Yiesla will also dis- 
cuss forcing bulbs Indoors for winter 
bloom. The program is co-sponsored by 
the Lake County Association for Family 
and Community Education. 

There is no charge to attend and the 
workshop is open to the public. For addition- 
al information and to pre-register call 223- 
8627. 



<< 



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LIFE'S A BEAR 

Camping ... I don't 
think so /B2 



MOVIE REVIEW 

The Sixth Sense 1 is 
a gift of guessing /B5 



PARENT'S PLACE 

The pjeasures of 
being a child 7 B9 



PULC OUT 

SECTION 



■ 



Section 



,- 




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- 

1P^ County YMCA campers 

ear Mom and Dad, camp is the |est, you wouldn't believe it up here' 
IVe made so many newmeads and the counselors areWcoo% See '* 
in a week. ^is* 

ortunity to bask in the sun, 
and see the brightest stars in 

YMCA Lake County in Waukegan has offered 
area children; ages 8-15?years-old, the chance, to go 
to Caitip Jom for nearly 50 years. 

In the northwoods of Wisconsin, through the 
back roads near Manitowish Waters nestled in the 

By KELLY CDUCKWORTH 
StaJTIntern 

woods and embraced by the waters of that state's 
chain of lakes, shines Camp Jorn. 

In 1953 Camp lorn opened Its doors to Lake 
County children. With the introduction of the inter- 
net and a newly created web page, the camp has wel- 
comed staff and campers from Spain, South America, 
the Czech Republic, Italy and throughout the U.S. 

"I was surprised that there were campers from 
throughout the world. I thought it would just be lo- 
cal. I think it's great. . . such diversity," first-year 
counselor Kyle Iverson, 18 of Lake Forest, said. 

In the past 47 years traditions have emerged, 

Please see EXPOSURE /B2 



Patrick Pulaski (above, left), 9, of Waukegan steadies his aim on a target during his archery lesson. Left, Camp Jorn 
recently added a sailing center to offer a more in-depth sailing course for its youngsters. Carrie Hixson (top, right), 11, 
of Beach Park enjoys a day out on the lake during her stay at Camp Jorn —Photos by Derek Nosat 




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ffi!L/Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



August 13, 1999 



Ai 



Just when you thought you might have to go camping 



I love a good scary movie. And I 
don't mean the blood, gore and 
dead-teenager extravaganzas 
that Hollywood has been pass- 
ing off as "scary" for the last 
decade— I mean spine tingling, nail- 
biting scary. 

Unfortunately, I am also one of 
those people who might be better 
off not watching them. While 1 may 
be a tough sell for telemarketers and 
politicians, I am the perfect chump 
for filmmakers who want you to 
leave the theater with a nervous 
chuckle and your hair standing on 
end— without hairspray. 

Which would still be fine, if I 
could just watch the movie and for- 
get about it when I get home. But 
considering I still check under the 
bed for the bogeyman and sleep 
with the covers up to my chin to 
prevent vampire bites, the effects of- 
ten linger indefinitely for me, caus- 
ing a permanent cramp in my 
lifestyle. 




LIFE'S 
A BEAR 

Donna Abear 



Here are some examples: 

1. 1 never thought twice about 
taking a shower when no one was 
home... until I saw "Psycho." Now 
the only way I'd shower in an empty 
house is with a padlock on the bath- 
room door and a good shower secu- 
rity system, like "44 Magnum on a 
Rope." 

2. Pea soup used to be one of my 
favorite foods... until I saw "The Ex- 
orcist" Now I can only eat it while 
wearing a cross and watching "Mass 
for Shut-ins." 

3. 1 used to gaze out at the ocean 
and feel a sense of calm and inspira- 
tion. ..until I saw "Jaws." Now I run 



up the beach screaming "SHARK1" If 
I catch a glimpse of a swimmer with 
a Mohawk haircut. 

These movies also, indirectly, 
end up affecting my husband's • 
lifestyle, too. For instance, some- 
times they disturb his sleep, like 
when I woke him up after I watched 
a scary movie by whispering, 
"Psst. . .honey. . .1 think the dog is 
dead." Not that there wasn't a per- 
fectly rational explanation for mat. 
You see, after the movie was over, I 
was climbing the stairs for bed when 
suddenly I heard our dog, who was 
muddy and banned to the garage, 
bark once and stop. Like any normal 
person, I assumed that a murderer 
was in the garage and had killed her. 

My husband didn't agree — es- 
pecially about the "normal" part. In 
fact, he'd be happier if I stopped 
watching scary movies altogether. 

But I can't help myself. I love 
them. Which Is why I talked him 
Into taking me to see "The Blair 



Witch Project" I had heard that it 
was a creative little gem of an inde- 
pendent film, one that scared you 
with little more than suggestion and 
an unusual film technique. 

For those of you who haven't 
caught it yet, the premise of the film 
is that you're watching "real" recov- 
ered film footage shot by three col- . 
lege students who disappeared per- 
manently after a camping trip into 
the woods, where they were produc- 
ing a documentary about the local 
legend of a witch who supposedly 
tortured and murdered area chil- 
dren. 

While there are no big "boo" 
type scares, the movie works Its in- 
sidious magic by combining "real : 
ism" with a steadily increasing sense 
of dread and fear. By the time it was 
over, I had a major case of the hee- 
bie jeebies. 

My husband knew right away 
what the result would be, especially 
when he saw me letting the dogs out 



in our heavily wooded backyard, 
armed with a Star Wars light saber 
and a pair of garden shears. 

"Great," he said with a sigh. "I 
guess we can cross camping off our 
list of future vacation choices, huh?" 

"What makes you say that?" I 
asked, shining my light saber at a 
suspicious looking pile of sticks. . 

But the truth is, he's right 
Camping is definitely out from now " 
on. And I almost felt bad about that 
until 1 suddenly remembered some- 
thing,— I don't LIKE camping! 

So maybe there's a lesson to be 
learned here. From this day forward, 
I will only watch movies that scare 
me away from doing things that I 
don't want to do anyway. 

No w if only someone Will make 
a really frightening film about clean- 
ing the house... 

Questions or comments for 
humorist Donna Abear can be sent to 
P.O. Box 391, AntiockIL 60002, 



FROM PAGE Bl 



EXPOSURE: Camp provides taste of nature 



wtmp=f- 



To give us HOT NEWS TIPS 
coll Lakeland Newspapers at 223-8073 

You can leave your name and number or remain anonymous. 
Leave a message and we'll check it out! 



friendships have outlasted time 
and a spirit of camp has been es- 
tablished. 

Camp Jom, or CJ, strives to 
give children the opportunity to 
grow and discover themselves. 

"I like leaving an impression 
on them as they are leaving an 
impression on me. It helps im- 
prove their self assurance, " sec- 
ond-year counselor Kristy Hen- 
drix, 21 of Zion, said. 

Changes in a child can be seen 
by parents after one week at CJ and 
the percentage of campers that re- 
turn each year and go on to be staff 
members is high, according to 
camp officials. 

Erin Richter, 19, of Waukegan, 
has spent 1 1 summers at camp, five 
of them as staff. She said, "Every- 
body has their own special role, [at 
CJ] here everybody is important" 

When asked why she contin- 
ues to return to camp each year, 
counselor Katy Reinholz, 20, of 
Lake Forest, said, "If I didn't come 
back it would be like not visiting 
my family at Christmas." 

Programs offered to all campers 
include sailing, kayaking, canoeing, 
swimming, arts and crafts, drama, 
dance, soccer and archery. 

Specialized programs have 
been introduced at an additional 
cost over the past ten years. 

Horseback riding was one of 
the first permanent programs 
added ten years ago and each year 
a new program has found its way 
into camper's numerous list of op- 
portunities. 

Last year the camp introduced 
water skiing. Through continual ef- 
forts, a permanent ski program was 



established this summer. 

Accredited water ski instructor, 
Josh Undquist, 22, of Mankato, 
Minn., had a dream of bringinghis 
love for water skiing into the camp 
scene. 

Lindquist and sailing instruc- 
tor, Weston Brzykcy, 17, from 
Maryland, spent three days train- 
ing at Camp Nicole t in 
Rhinelander, Wise. 

"I love it, It's a great addition to 
camp. It offers a lot for the kids and 
gives those kids a chance who've 
never had the opportunity to ski or 
tube," Lindquist said. 

Second-year camper Daniel 
Lainio, 10, of Beach Park, said, "My 
favorite part is skiing because you 
get to go everywhere around the 
lake and everyone looks at you and 
you feel cool." 

Camper Alex Kueny, 10, of 
Gumee, said, "It is hard, but I felt I 
had accomplished something." 

In addition to an accredited 
sail instructor, the newly renovated 
sail center— designed by the CJ 
board of directors and dedicated in 
memory of longtime friend of CJ, 
Ed Fuerst — was added. 

Besides the many activities of- 
fered on CJ grounds, campers also 
are given the opportunity to test 
their skills off grounds. 

Each cabin, separated by age 
and sex, venture with their coun- 
selors, age 18 and older, and junior 
counselors, age 16-18, into the 
chain of lakes. 

It is challengea for everyone, 
even the staff who do this each ses- 
sion for ten weeks. The success of 
the canoe trip depends upon the 
perseverance, dedication and ef- 



fort of each camper. 

Campers learn the rewards of 
teamwork and camaraderie, ac- 
cording to Hendrix. 

Counselors believe the trips 
are an adventure that lead to 
growth emotionally and mentally. 
It encourages each camper to 
reach goals and push that extra 
mile to accomplish something. 

CJ also has brought back the 
Counselor-In-Training program by 
popular demand. It was revitalized 
in 1997 after having been cancelled 
for 10 years due to a decline in en- 
rollment, according to Dennis Lipp, 
CJ director. 

CIT's are guided by two coun- 
selors for an entire month. During 
that month they become skilled In 
all areas of camp and well rounded 
In the activities. 

"Where in theory if they come 
back next year they will be ready, " 
CIT counselor Tahnee Lee Bour- 
I and, 18 of Zion, said. 

CJ is hoping to grow and accom- 
modate more campers and staff as it 
enters the new millennium. 

CJ Director Lipp and the board 
of directors has developed a cam- 
paign to improve camp. 

Their project plans include 
new staff housing, a crafts building, 
new camper cabins and lodge im- 
provements. 

Funding will come through do- 
nations, pledges and other forms of 
giving. 

The Growing to Serve YOUth 
Campaign hopes to raise $500,000 
by the year 2003. 

Camp Jom is a non-profit or- 
ganization affiliated with the 
YMCAoftheUSA. 




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August 13, 1999 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers/33 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



Bonsai show held at 
Chicago Botanic Garden 

Seven bonsai masters, including Ernie Kuo, one of the most 
well-known bonsai artists In the US, will highlight the Mid- 
west Bonsai Society's 22nd annual exhibit at the Chicago 
Botanic Garden 1000 Lake Cook Rd. in Glencoe, Aug. 20-22. 
Staged throughout the Botanic Garden's Education Center and 
adjoining outdoor areas, the exhibit will include the display of 200 
bonsi trees, designed by hobbyists from across the Midwest, and 
reflecting all types of bonsai. This year/ trees styled by well-known 
masters such as Kathy Shaner, Roy Nagatoshi and Ted Matson will 
be raffled during the exhibit. A rock, ideal for planting Mugo and 
hand-picked in Japan by bonsai master Susumu Nakamura, will be 
offered, as will a white spruce created by Shaner In 1998. 

Continuous demonstrations and hands-on workshops will al- 
low beginners and accomplished growers to learn more about bon- 
sai from some of the world's finest experts. 

Bonsai (pronounced bone-sigh) originated In far east Asia over 
a thousand years ago, flourishing In the gardens of China, and later 
Japan. For centuries, techniques were guarded secrets. 

The original bonsai specimens were trees growing on high 
craggy terrain which were naturally stunted by severe winds. They 
had sparse foliage with dramatic, twisting trunks, making them the 
envy of emperors. The art form began evolving when gardeners be- 
gan cultivating that exotic, twisted dwarf look with techniques 
passed down over the centuries from one generation to the next. 
Experts will be on hand at the Bonsai Exhibit to answer ques- 
tions and explain the shaping process to visitors. 

Enthusiastic beginners can get started at the show by visiting 
the special outdoor area which will be devoted to 
12 vendors selling bonsai trees, raw nursery 
V: stock, pots, tools and supplies to meet the" 

needs of both novices and experienced 
growers. 

Demonstrations cost $1; workshops 
.are $50, plus the cost of materials. All . 
exhibits are free. 

Show hours are Fri., noon-5 p.m., Sat; 
and Sun., 9 a.m. -5 p.m. Although admis- 
sion is free to the show and Garden it- 
self, there is a $7 parking fee. 
For more information, call The 
Botanic Garden at 835-5440. 



AUDITIONS 




New Oratorio Singer 
auditions 

The highly acclaimed New Oratorio 
Singers (TNOs) will hold auditions be- 
ginning at 7 p.m. August 17and 19 at 
William Frcmd High School, 1000 S 

Quentln Rd., Palatine, 

During the 6-8 minute audition, 
each singer will be requested to; Vocal- 
ize to determine voice part and range; 
aingashort familiar piece, or bring one 
of your own, between 2-4 minutes; Sight 
read a short, simple unfamiliar piece; 
Match melodic/rhythmic patterns 
played on the piano. 

Please call 604-1067 to make an ap- 
pointment for your audition. 

Auditions for Secret 
Garden 

^ The Waukegan Community Players 
will be holding public auditions for Its 
next production, The Secret Garden, 
from 830 p.m. on August 16-17. These 
will be held in the Rosenwald Cottage In 
Bowen Park, which is the first building 
to the right at the North entrance. , 
There are openings for six adults; three 
male and three female, for those be- 
tween the ages of seventeen and seven- 
ty-five. There are four youth roles; two 
male and two female, for those between 
the ages of nine and sixteen. The play 
will be directed by Richard D. Pope, and 
all die performances will be held at 
Pro vena St Therese Hospital Auditori- 
um on the following dates: Oct 15- 
17lh, 22-23. For more Information, 
please call 662-0181. 

Village Theatre 
auditions 

Village Theatre or Palatine will hold 
auditions for 'Blithe Spirit" on August 
15- I6at Cutting HaUTheatre, 150 E. 
Wood St, Palatine. 730 p.m. Parts are 
available for two men ages 35-50 and 
five women ages 25-60. 

Auditions will be cold readings from 
the script Performance dates are Octo- 
ber 22-24, 29-30, Nov. 5-7. 12-13. 

Village Theatre Is also looking for 
backstage and technical support. 



.. 



Please call Sally Moomey 359-7593. 



KIDS STUFF 



A Day Out With Thomas 

Thomas the Tank Engine comes to 
the Illinois Railway Museum, in Union 
August 13-15, at 1050 am. to 5 p.m. 
(rides on the half-hour.) 

This Is America's largest Railroad Mu- 
seum with the closest operating Steam ' 
Locomotive in the Chlcagolandarea. 

The admission price is $10 adults, S10 
children, $1 for children under one- 
year-old. These prices Include admis- 
sion and a ride on the Thomas Train and 
rides on all other operating railroad 
equipment. 

For more Information call 1-B00-BIG-' 
•riAIL, or their website: www.irm.org. 



HEALTH 



Yoga classes 

Barbara Spietz, Holistic Trainer and 
Practical Living Yoga instructor, will 
teach classes at Gorton Community 
Center, 400 East Illinois Rd, Lake Forest, 
beginning Friday, Aug. 13, from 1030 
a.m. • 12 noon. The class runs through 
Oct 1, and the fee Is $64. 

Interested participants should reg- 
ister and pay in advance. For further In- 
formation, or to receive a program 
brochure, contact or stop by the Gorton 
office at 234-6060 between 9 a.m. and 
430 p.m., weekdays. 

S PE CIAL EVENT? 

Ice Skating exchange 

Set aside Sat; Aug. 14 on your cal- 
endar tqstop by the No rthbrook Park . 
District's Skate & Equipment Exchange. 
Hockey players and Ice skaters can 
choose to purchase among a variety of 
genuy used dating equipment from 1 1 7 
am. to 2 pjn.at the Sports Center, 1720 
Pflngsten Rd. In Noithbrook. 

Pick up for unsold items and money 
will be Sun., Aug. 15, from 3-5 p.m. The 
Skate & Equipment Exchange Is spon- 
sored by the No rthbrook Competitive 
Figure Skating Team. For more informa- 
tion, please call Valerie at 480-7963. 



Antiques Show 

The 1999 Summer Chicago 
O'Hare Antiques Show & Antiquarian 
Book Fair will be held Aug. 13-15 at the 
Rosemont Convention Center near 
O'Hare Airport. 

Show hours are: Friday, noon to 9 
p.m.; Sat. noon-B p.m., and Sun., noon 
to 6 p.m. Admission Is $8 and Is good for . 
return eritiy all 3 day* Children under 
12 are admitted free. The Rosemont 
Convention Center Is located next to the 
O'Hare Hyatt Regency on River Rd., Just 
off the Kennedy Expressway, ortake I- 
294 lb O'Hare exit 

For more Information, call Dolphin 
Promotions/Manor House Shows at 
954-563-6747 or 708-366-2710. 

Appreciation night 

On Friday Aug. 13, Rink Side Sports 
and Family Entertainment Center will 
host a military appreciation night All 
military personnel are Invited from 430- 
10 p.m. to attend. Receive a free $10 fun 
card to spend as you wish. You can play 
your choice of over 70 video games in 
their state-of-the-art interactive game 
arena, or play a game of Laser Runner, 
ice skate or enjoy their soft play area. 
Friends and family are welcome. They 
will be charged regular activity prices. 
Rink Side is looking for a way to thank 
you to those who serve our country. For 
more information please call 856- 1064. 



THEATRE 



The Schemings of 
Scapin 

"The Scemings of Scapin," a new 
adaptation of Moliere's classic farce, 
part of Stage Two's Mollere Theater 
Festival. 

Performances are Thursdays and 
Fridays at 7 p.m. August 15 and 22 at 
3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sundays at the Cu- 
nco Gardens. 

The cost for admission Is 515 for 
general pubUc.Sia tor «udenu,te- 
ntors and museum members and 5VO 
for groups of 8 or more. 

For further Information please call 

630-2940. 



HOROSCOPE 



Aries - March 21/April 20 
A loved one offers you constructive 
criticism about your personal life. 
Don't get defensive; just listen. He 
or she is looking out for your best 
Interest. A close friend invites you 
out for a night on the town late In 
the week. Say yes, because it's 
sure to be a good time. Taurus 
plays an important role. 
Taurus- April 21/May 21 
While you're normally the strong, 
silent type, you turn Into a chatter- 
box when you meet an interesting 
person this, week, Taurus. Get to 
know htm or her better — it defi- 
nitely will be worth your effort. A 
loved-bne needs help with a home- 



improvement project; Do what you 
can for him or her. 
Gemini - May 22/June 21 
You have to do some quick think- 
ing when it comes to a problem at 
work. A co-worker makes a costly 
mistake, and you need to come up 
with a solution. The higher-ups are 
counting on you. Your efforts will 
be rewarded. The person whom 
you've been. seeing wants to take 
a break. Don't get upset. Time 
apart will do you good. 
Cancer - June 22/July 22 
When It comes to romance this 
week, Cancer, you're going to 
have to make the first move. The 
person whom you like reciprocates 



your feelings, but is too shy to ask 
you out. Take the initiative. It will 
be worth your effort! A business 
acquaintance confides In you 
about a problem. Be supportive. 
Leo - July 23/August 23 
Don't be shy when an acquain- 
tance reveals his or her true feel- 
ings for you. Be yourself, and tell 
this person exactly how you feel. A 
loved one asks to borrow money, 
Don't automatically say yes. First, 
find out what the money: Is for. 
Something is suspicious about the 
whole scenario. . 
Virgo- Aug 24/Sept 22 
You have an Important meeting ear- 
ly In the week, Virgo. Don't be late for 



it If you are, you could miss out on an 
interesting travel opportunity. A friend 
of afriend asks to meet with you. Get 
together with him or her; you could 
learn some Intriguing Information. 
Scorpio plays an Important role on 
Tuesday. 

Libra- Sept 23/Oct 23 
Don't sulk over a minor disagree- 
ment with a friend. Neither of you 
means the things that you say. Just 
talk with him or her, and clear the 
air. Your relationship will be back 
to normal soon. A loved one gets 
you involved In a family problem. 
Even though you're upset about it, 
do what you can to help. 
Scorpio - Oct 24/Nov 22 




ffpw&Jcm 

\(d?// Presents v^Ol 

^Lie, Cheat & Genuflech J 

fay William Van Zandt& Jane Milmore 
Directed by Peter Pintozzi 

August 13, 14 

at 8:00 p.m. 

August 15 

at 2:30 p.m. 

Frl. & Sat. 8 p.m.; SundayMatlnee 2:30 p.m. 

Adults $10; Students &' Seniors $8 

Call for Reservations 

395-3055 

PM&L Theatre • 877 Main St., Antioch 

Box Office Now Open 

Box OHice Hours: Mon. mru Trwrs. 5:30-7:30 pm.; Sal. 1 1-2 
1 1/2 hra. bclore showtime, Reserved Seating. VISA/MC 




*ballet 

*pointe 

^preschool 

*adult classes 

*pom pons 

^competition teams 



*jazz hip-hop/funk 

^combination classes 

*dance conventions 

* guest teachers 

*tap 

*\vorkshops 



CLASSES BEGIN 
AUGUST 16, 1999 



Keep your eyes and ears open this 
week, Scorpio. Something Is going 
on at work, and it has everyone on 
edge. Try to find out what's hap- 
pening. Co-workers are looking to 
you for answers. That special 
someone has a surprise for you 
late in the week. Enjoyl 
Sagittarius - Nov 23/Dec 21 
You run into an old friend early In 
the week, Sagittarius. Spend time 
with him or her; catch up on the 
gossip. You'll learn some Interest- 
ing information. A loved one asks 
you to help him or her get ready for 
an important date. Do your best to 
keep this person calm and upbeat, 
Capricorn - Dec 22/Jan 20 
While you want to make your mark 
at work, don't do it at a co-worker's 
expense. Work diligently to earn 
praise; don't try to get It by making 
someone else look bad. That spe- 
cial someone has an important 
question to ask you. Be honest — • 
even if you know that he or she 
doesn't want to hear what you 
have to say. 

Aquarius - Jan 21 /Feb 1 8 
Don't bite off more than you can 
chew this week, Aquarius. A lot of 
people are asking you to help 
them, but you can't do everything. 
Set your priorities, and focus on 
what's most important. An intrigu- 
ing person asks you to lunch late in 
the week. Say yes, because It's 
,sure to be fun. 
-Pisces - Feb 19/March 20 
Try to look at the bright side .of. 
things when a personal problem 
arises, Pisces. Things aren't as 
bad as they seem. Turn to loved, 
ones for comfort. They always will 

I be there for you. A close friend 
asks a favor of you. Do what you 
can to help. 









.^fr— r'l* 1 ** i 



t.k - ^j^t-^s^aatThntJkjrtltbeUuAgW^sUt 



B4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Confessions of a movie maverick 



GLORIA DAVIS 
Correspondent 



I confess that I am one of those movie miscre- 
ants who have tried to watch both "Star 
Wars" with no success except to gain a few 
extra hours of sleep. 

In light of the kudos given both pictures by 
"those who know good movies, the learned crit- 
ics," and the zillions of dollars spent by the general 
public, I guess my taste in movies is sadly lacking 
for everyone knows that "those who know" and 
those who spend the most money just have to be 
right. 

And now it's happened again. For many 
movie lovers, especially those of us who lean to- 
wards love and romance, the two most awaited 
movies of the summer, "Eyes Wide Shut," and 
"Runaway Bride," have arrived. 

"Eyes" has been applauded as the late director 
Stanley Kubrick's finest accomplishment, with ■ 
most critics giving Tom Cruise and wife Nicole Kid- 
man credit for the finest performances of their ca- 
reers for delving into very explicit sex for all to see. 

Of course this means that those teens 17 years 
and over, besides the many younger ones who are 
not carded, are now all privy to another load of 
sex problems to pile onto their own early experi- 
ments, something the world really needs. 

These same purveyors of little more than their 
own opinions and the fact they have probably 
seen every movie ever made, the critics that is, tell 
us in no uncertain terms that Julia Roberts, 
Richard Gere and director Gary Marshall and 
"Bride" all fail to bring us the romantic enjoyment 
that "Pretty Woman" did. 

What many forget is that many of these same 
purveyors of their own opinion although beguiled 
by the charms of the unknown Roberts, called 
"Pretty Woman" silly and impossible, until movie 
audiences the world over went with their pure en- 
joyment of the film and declared this unbelievable 
"Cinderella" story about a hooker and a million- 
aire ending up together, a smash. 

As far as "Eyes" is concerned, there is little 
argument that it is a brilliantly shot, superbly 
acted, peek into the bedroom of two people 
with sexual problems that permeate their en- 



tire dark lives, great for film and psychology 
students and those who care a lot about other 
people's sex lives. 

For those who go to the movies to be enter- 
tained, this film does little more than turn on or 
depress, depending on the mood. In fact, as well 
done as it is, "Eyes" simply gave me a headache. 
Maybe it was from wondering why I didn't really 
care about these people's sex problems, and I can 
get that for free by watching "Red Shoes Diary" or 
"Sex and the City" on cable. 

I went to see "Bride" twice, the first time be- . 
cause it opened on the hottest day of the year and 
the show's air conditioning was right up there 
with the sexy K uks of Gere and the charm of 
Roberts. 

Granted the plot is a blob of marshmallow and 
expected, many of the jokes were a little corny, but 
I, along with two shows filled with people smiling 
and chuckling, got my sweet tooth satiated and a 
little com tastes good now and then. What's 
wrong with that, at least it didn't result in some- 
thing extra on each hip. 

The part of me that loves to watch pretty 
people having fun and not being miserable, 
and still believes in unexplained love, that 
electric look that can flash between two peo- 
ple, and the words of "Some Enchanted 
Evening," enjoyed herself thoroughly. Besides 
no one can deny that not only the people, but 
the movie itself is great to look at. 

Roberts is as delightful as she was in "Pretty 
Woman," "My Best Friend's Wedding," and "Not- 
ting Hill," and although Gere seems to be just am- 
bling his handsome self through a fun few days, 
any critic that says there is no chemistry between 
the two gets an "F" in the science of love, again 
only in my humble opinion. 

It's fun, its rated PG with no explicit sex 
scenes, it's a feel good chick flick, so we give it 
a capital "E" for enjoyment, but remember 
this all comes from a person who also com- 
mitted the unforgivable cinematic sin of not 
finding Charlie Chaplin funny, who doesn't 
mind a Barry Manilow tune now and then, 
and even enjoyed listening to John Tesh play 
the piano once. What do I know? I guess I just 
know what I like. 



CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

I.Slope 

5. Henry Lodge, 

American politician 
10. Ace 

14. Asian nation 

15. First letter of the Hebrew 
alphabet 

16. Tropical starchy tuber- 
ous root 

17. Spurs' town 
20. Most cagey 
21.Na-dene 

22. Cathode-ray tube 

23. Tal 

25. Digressions 
29. Farmer 

33. Prongs 

34. Macaws 

35. India writing paper 

36. Continuance tn time 
38. Ukes Igneous rock 

41. Develop 

42. Publicizes 

44. Long-necked birds 

45. Musical composition 

48. Fuddled 

49. Young girl 

50. European money 

51. Hurts 

54. Thrombocyte 
59. Bulls' town 

62. Make ale 

63. Airs 

64. Long mucilaginous 
green pods 

65. Epic 

66. Jam 

67. Fibber 

DOWN 

1. Greenish-yellow variety 

2. Female domestic 

3. Grandmother 

4. Knot In a tree 

5. Supplies 

6. Belgian city 

7. Used of back or head 

8. Near, against 

9. Tal 

10. Meat slices 

11. Cab 

12. Rumanian city 




Aug 



I 



ml in 
shan 
The J 
plant 
mala 
V 

SO-CI 

ourr 
Sensi 
Hear 
prog 
theu 
eninj 



us. 



13. Large genus of prickly 
shrubs 

18. Most dainty 

19. You 

23. Short-billed rails 

24. Bird genus 

25. First cervical vertebra 

26. Blockade 

27. Located or occurring 
within 

28. Angle, abbr. 

29. Jean Henri , 

French entomologist 

30. Carryalls 

31. Musical piece 

32. Hurried 

37. Robert , poet 

39. Long-legged rabbit- 
sized rodent 

40. Romanian monetary 
unit 

43. Many subconsciouss- 
es 

46. In a way, picks 

47. Launched Apollo 

48. Plates 

50. Greece 

51. Perfection 



52. Cranny 

53. Hawaiian town 

54. Peer 

55. Organic compound 

56. Scandinavian god of 
discord 

57. Mammal genus 

58. Czar 

60. Narrow opening 

61. Belonging to us 



ANSWERS 





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O 1949-1999 ^ 



FIRST STATE BANK OF ROUND LAKE 

Celebrating 50 years of service to the community. 
Our Golden Anniversary brings you Golden Opportunities. 



AUGUST'S GOLDEN 

OPPORTUNITY 

THREE YEAR "CAP" CD 



$5,000 MINIMUM DEPOSIT 

6.05% ANNUAL 

PERCENTAGE YIELD 

Substantial Penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. Member FDIC 

Open yours today and receive a free cap!! 

MAIN OFFICE: 




Customer 

Appreciation 

Picnic 

l Frl r Aug. 27th 

Noon to 7 PM 



llN! 
G 

D 

iMi 



EtAdcpoalof Inwnd MIOtWO 




1777 N. Cedar Lake Road 

Round Lake Beach, IL 60073 

(847)546-2111 



FBOW. OtrOSII KUMKX COWCIUI W 



BIG SAVIN 




LENDER' 



mm 



August 13, 1993 



I 






- 



FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT 



Lakeland Newspapers /B5 




IS 9. i 




ike hypnosis, a good film 
needs a willing participant 
and an open mind that is 
I prepared to follow the care- 
ful instruction of an all-knowing 
shaman to destinations unknown. 
The Sixth Sense is that higher 
plane and director M. Night Shya- 
malan takes you there. 

While many of this summer's 
so-called box office hits have taken 
our minds nowhere, The Sixth 
Sense kidnaps you like Patty 
Hearst, holds you hostage, then re- 
programs your mind to consider 
the unfamiliar, sometimes fright- 
ening world that revolves around 
us. 

For once, Bruce Willis leaves 
behind his action hero persona 
and scores a fine performance as 
child psychologist Malcolm Crowe, 
who lives with his feeling-neglect- 
ed.wife Anna (Olivia Williams) in 
south Philadelphia. 

The couple are basking In the 
glow of Malcolm's success after he 
is honored by the mayor for his 
work with children when deranged 
former patient Vincent Gray, (Don- 
nie Wahlberg) is discovered hiding 
In their bathroom. Vincent does 

fCLASSICWONEMA 

Hm IHMllmO a ** , l!ip!M>»**»^"IH^*it>n 



FOX LAKE 

115 Lakeland Plaza 
847-973-2800 



■nil 



In nil auditoriums > DIGITAL 



SHOWTIMES— FRIDAY, AUG. 13 
THRU THURSDAY, AUGUST 19 

DAILY MATINEES 



RUNAWAY BRIDE* r, G] 

DIGITAL 
Dally 1:00 4:10 7:00 9:40 

THOMAS CROWN 

AFFAIR* m 

Dally 1:30 4:20 7:10 9:45 

INSPECTOR 
GADGET [pg] 

Dally 12:50 2:50 4:50 7:20 9:20 

MYSTERY MEN* ire,,] 

Dally 1:10 3:50 6:50 9:30 



DEEP BLUE SEA 



[R] 



Dally 1:20 4:00 7:20 9:50 
•No pmo er coupon* 



FREE REFILLS 

POPCORN fit SOFT DRINKS 

Mo (Mtta mitt » »WlW te 1-fotad main chtltU 



www.classiccinemas.coni 

WHERE MOVIt GOING IS fUN AND AffOROABU 



►vie review 

!■■■■■»■■■! 





Angela D. Sykora 



The Sixth 

Rated PG-13 
Director 

M. Night Shyamolan 

Starring 

Bruce Willis 

Haley Joel Osment 

ToniCoIlette 

Olivia Williams 

Donnie Wahlberg 



not share in the mayor's praise, 
and the first piece of the puzzle is 
gifted to us to hold onto and be fit- 
ted later. 

The story jumps to next fall and 
Malcolm is taking steps to befriend 
his new patient, 8-year-old Cole 
Sears, played remarkably by next- 
big-thing Haley Joel Osment, who ; 
hauntingly reminds him of the boy 
he failed. Li ke Vincent, Cole is a 




I 94 * Giond &<• Watl 
»4' &SJ "40 



GURNEE 







HON GIANT IPb) 



ANTIW 

ICIOWN 



HAUNTING (PG1JI 1 200. 230, 505, 705, (005 

AMII1CAN PlI V 1145, 150 355, 605, MS. 1010 

&CTO«GAlkrr(W| H50.H5 ;.W.Sto,7M.9M 

llTH WIDE SHUT (If 55,305, 615, K5 

m\ IUJI SEA I ' 1205. 220; 430. 645, 900 

iTAI WUS 1P0) • 1230 330, 630, 9j0 

IAIIANI0) 1205,210.410 

IHI OENflll'S DAU0HTEI (I) ■ 620.850 

DICKiraUl 1225.235,445,655 

THE WOOD II 905 

II P DADDY |roi31 1)0.310.520.725, 930 

THE COLUMBIA PICTUIKS 
T5lh ANNIVE1SA1Y FILM FESTIVAL 
UNKNOT Of AJLUIA IPC) I/IJI 1« 1145.400,615 
oSummUXXNl IK) W15 I »6 H45. 400. 605 
EWYraSTlJ 6/15111155.600,1010 

rTHAmO Wl NKHT (01 WW 1145.440,945 
M^SMmToOOTO WJUANGTON 10) BI17 200. 700 



USOIONTHiUVaKWUlPO) 

cuss mm coma to otm 

fsgagm 



Jll 100.430,600 
'pO)M9 1l45,44i,94J 



Friday 8/13 through Thursday 8/19 






ANTIOCH (847) 395-0216 
378 Lake St., Antioch 



SAQQ SENIORS IK A OVER). CHILDREN 
Z IlllUNDEBHAaSHOWSBEEORESPM 

■" koo «uu admission after spm 

NO ADVANCE TICKET SALES. 
NO PASSES OF ANY KIND, 



INSPECTOR 
GADGET 

(PC) 

DAILY 2:30, 4:30, 6:30) 8:30 



LIBERTY (847)362-3011 
708 N. Milwaukee Ave., Ubertyville 



<50nfl SOOORSIWiOVERLCKiLDRW 
*Z (1ltUN0ER)IAUSHOWSeEfOAE5PM 
*• kOOADUaADMtSSIONAnEHSPM * 

BIG DADDY (ro-is) 

Frl., SaL & Sua 6:30, 8:45 
Moo.-Thurv 3:45 

TARZAN (G> 

Fri„ Sal. 4 Sun. 2:30. 4 JO 
Moa-Thun. &30 

HE SIXTH S8£E (pg-13) 

Frl., SaL A Sun. £00, 4:15, 6:45, 930 
Mon.«Thurs.6:45,fcOO 



*j» McHENRY INDOOR (815) 385-0144 • 

tAOwL^ArriRwi 1204 N. Green St., Mcnenry J 



star wars- EPtsooe i MUPPETS IN SPACE LAKE PIACID 

Sat* Sun. 2=00,4:45; 730 ' ' -' . i ! 



Sat & Sun, 6:30, 8:30 



I McHenry Outdoor 



Adults & Chilcjrei 



DRIVE-IN THEATRE Great 

Chapel Hill Rd. -North of Rt. 120 Family 



AMERICAN PIE THE THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR 

(R) W 

Show Starts 8:30 Show Starts 10:45 

TTTtTT TT ' ' ! ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 nrr 





Bruce Willis (right) and new- 
comer Haley Joel Osment star 
In the psychological thriller "The 
Sixth Sense." 

child of divorce and taunted by 
ruthless classmates who call him 
"Freak." 

However, he doesn't care so 




'S< 



Martin Mc Don agh has a knack 
— far beyond his 28 years — for get- 
ting down to the nitty-gritty in rela- 
tionships. 

In "The Beauty Queen of 
Leenane," a stunning work full , of 
dark comedy, the playwright focus- 
es on two women, a querulous, ag- 
ing mother and her resentful, lonely 
40-year-old daughter. Their con- 
tentiousness goes from bad to 
worse as Maureen , worn out as a 
full-time care giver, sees a chance at 
love and escape slip through her 
fingers. 

No nuance escapes Randall Ar- 
ney's taut direction at Chicago's 
Steppenwolf Theatre, where the 
stage has been transformed to a 
small, out-of-the-way cottage In 
Leenane, a small town in Ireland 
where the views are picturesque but 



rr*\ General Cinema 

&) LAKEHURST 



[ROUTE 43 noar ROUTE 1 20 

18471 444-FILM igo 

t AtOAIN MAT1NIU IVMV DAT 

aii tMOWi urou * r* 



SHOWTIMES FOR 8/13 THRU 8/19 



| BARGAIN MATINEES ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6PM 
'INDICATES VIP TICKET RESTRICTIONS APPLY 



DETROIT ROCK CITY ( rj 

| DAILY 12:45, 3:00, 5:15, 7:30. 9:45 

I DEEP BLUE SEA mi 

DAILY 2:15, 4:45,7:30, 10:00 



BOWFINGER pa-m 

| DAILY 2:00. 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 

I IRON GIANT (PO) 

DAILY 12:30, 2:45. 5:00, 7:15 



MYSTERY MEN (po-io) 

DAILY 1:30. 4:15, 7:00. 9:45 



THOMAS CROWN m 

DAILY 1:45. 4:25, 7:10. 10:00 



RUNAWAY BRIDE (pq» 

DAILY 2:15, 4:55, 7:30.10:05 



BROKENDOWN PALACE 

(PQ-13) 

DAILY 1:45. 4:20. 7:00. 9:35 . • 



DICK(P0-13) 
DAILY 2:00, 9:25 



much about what his classmates 
think as what his own mother Lynn 
(Ton! Coliette) .thinks of him. Not 
wanting to put more strain on her 
new job as a single mom, Cole . 
shields her from the emotional and 
physical torment he suffers on a 
regular basis. 

•-•Having her* believe that his 
scratches are from bullies and his 
Isolatlohthe result of the divorce 
makes for a much quieter alarm of 
concern. 

'Cynical and mature well be- 
yond his eight years, Cole is un- 
' convinced that Malcolm can make 
his problems go away because 
what haunts his fragile young mind 
is more than psychological; it's su- 
pernatural. 

Cole possesses the sixth sense. 
He is a channel for the dead whose 
souls cannot rest until their busi- 
ness on earth is finished, but he's 
too scared of the "ghosts" to even 
begin to help them. 

He divulges his secret to Mal- 



colm who Is then forced to re- 
nounce logic and give into the pos- 
sibility that what we can see with , 
the naked eye may not be all there 
is. 

The bond that forms between 
Cole and Malcolm should lead to 
an obvious resolution where 
Cole eventually becomes a well- 
adjusted kid and Malcolm is de- 
livered from the pain of not be- 
ing able to save his former pa- 
tient and finally gets to spend - 
some much-needed quality time' 
with his lonely and Increasingly 
perturbed wife. 

■ But, this Is not a film that al- 
lows you to believe that you know 
it all. You know nothing, and as 
you're walking out of the theater . 
making excuses for your gullibility, 
: you'll feel about this big, then 
you'll also want to see it again. 

I give The Sixth Sense three- 
and-a-half popcorn boxes out of 
five for being, well, out of this 
world. 



THEATRE REVIEW 




ueen' shines-warts and all 




Laurie Metcalf and Aideen O'Kelly In a scene from The Beauty 
Queen of Leenane." 



the jobs practically nonexistent 

Laurie Metcalf plays Maureen 
(Rondl Reed will assume the same 
role Aug. 8-29), an emotionally trou- 
bled woman convinced that life has 
passed her by. Without giving too 
j much away, let it be said that she 
has a mean streak and she gives it 
full reign. Aideen O'Kelly shines as 
the ciintankerous, interfering senior 
whose less of an invalid that she lets 
on. Her character, Mag, may not be 
pleased with her daughter, but 
that's what lies between her and an 



THE HAUNTING (pq io> 

JDAILY 4:40^-7:20, 10:00 , 

I SIXTH SENSE (pq-13) 

I DAILY 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 7:45, 10:15 



[INSPECTOR GADGET (po) 

I DAILY 1:0 0. 3:00. 5:00,7:15, 9:30 

BLAR WITCH PROJECT « 

FBI. & SAT, 1:00, 3:10, 5:15. 7:25, 9:30, 
11:30 SUM'-THURS. 1:00, 3:10, 5:15. 
7:25, 9:30 



THE ROCKY HORROR 
PICTURE SHOW (R) SAT. 1130 



GIFT CERTIFICATES ON SALE 



Show/Place 8 

VERNON HILLS 

Milwaukee Ave-2nd Light S ofOpD 
?t 847/247-8958 & 



ALL SEATS s 2?° FRI & Sat 
s 1. 50 Sun thru Thurs 



Showtime! For Fri,8/l3ThmTIiufs,8/l9 
*Sat.-Sun. Matinees in (Brackets] 

MUPPETS FROM SPACE (G) 
L*j:40 *3:50] 6:40 9:00 

TEA WITH MUSSOLINI (PG) 

[*I:I0 *3:50] 7:10 9:50 

THE MATRIX (R) 

* [*l2i30 *l:00 *3:30 *4:O0J 
6:50 7:20 9:45 I0:I0 

THE MUMMY <pg-I3) 

pl:l5 *4:I0]7:I5 10:00 

INSTINCT (R) 

[*l:20 *4:05] 7:30 10:05 

ENTRAPMENT (pg-13) 

[*|:20 *4:I5] 7:45 10:15- 
ANALYZE THIS (R) 

[*l:50 *4:20] 7;40 10:20 
vlilt our wbirti at www.m«iotwxom"1 



old peoples' home. 

Meanwhile, Rick Snyder, as an 
old flame from the past, finds him- 
self drawn to Maureen. But don't 
expect an happy endings in this- 
Irish drama. 

Christopher Fitzgerald rounds 
out the superb cast as a self-ab- 
sorbed neighborhood youth. 

In McDonagh's play, everyone 
holds grudges and there's little will- 
ingness to meet someone halfway. 
The wrangling, however, can be wit- 
ty and true to life. 

"The Beauty Queen of Leenane" 
runs through Aug. 29. Ticket infor- 
mation is available at (312) 335- 
1650.— By Tom Witom 



lilOAIN IUMMII VHOWUH { I 
IM0DAT AOVANCfO MCM IS 

k . S»..lf««i "w.l.i*., 

{■111,1 l.t.irM. J-C»l 

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CINEMAS 

■u.,mWi..iii. i \n h ucu . 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 18 

nollins Hd Bh»n Hi 83 & C».Uf t.ikr fidMMJt-l^AJ 



*., Alt A.MlHO.MHIlS 



• BROKEDOWNPALACCf PQ-13) ll0033i|9^>» 

BO "w5 < l i i4V2:5s"lSS2S16.40 7:M9:t0 tO.OOl 
DETROIT BOCK CITY (R) [1 2:1 5 r& * 401 7^i ItftM DO 
TMC THOMAS CROWN AFFWfl|R) U23S 3 ill T3S 10 10 OB 

• THE IRON OUNT(PO) (12 20 2-30 4: 45) 7.10 9 20 cc 
HY5tEnYMEN(PQ-») ltil0 3 05l6J50»OC 
wTHC SJXTH SENSE (PO-1J) (12453 10) 7.009:36 OB 
DICK (PG-13) (4:3S)9:)50O 
TM£6Ulifl WITCH PROJECT lfi)!!2 50 2 5Ct 55)7 40 3 i« 
RUNAWAY BHIOE(PO) - • ,.,.'„« 

(1 2 OS 12-30 £25 3 00 4.SS 5 351 7.25 S 05 9 55 oc 
OEEP BLUE SEA(R) ( 12 15 2 50 5 20) 7 50 10 05 OO 
INSPECTOR OADOET(PO) (12202:35 4:45) 720 B35DD 
THEMAUMTlNO(PO-i3) (1:10 4 00)700 9:30— 
AMERICAN PIE (R) ' (12:002*0 4.50)7:1 \S 9:40 

BIQ DADDY (PQ-13) • t'^JSS 

THE GENERAL'S OAUOMTER(R) «.S0 9.50 

STAR WARS (PQ) (12J53J0) «30 9J0 



LAKE ZURICH 12 

/SV & Hjntl Ad a-l'SSOOO 



. ». 5i.i(Jinm Sc.iiiiii; 



DIGITAL ^OUND 



T* I T 



JOWFINGEfl (PQ-13) (12:20 2:40 5.00) 720 9.40 DD 
t BR0KEDOWH PALACe(rO-t3) (1 1 1 S 1:40 4 0$) 6 X S » im 
OETROITROCK CTTY(R) (11:45 2JJ5 425) 6.45 9.05 m 
TH£ THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR (R) - 

-* (11*)2«) 430) 7.00 »05i» 
MYSTERY MENtPG-ni 1 1 100 1'35 4.10)6 45 9 30 «TH 

,THE SIXTH SENSE(PQ-13» (1150220450172095000 
• THE IRON OIANTIPQ) (11.00 100 100 500) 7.«<W 
RUNAWAY BRIDE(PQ) (11:15.1:504:25) 7:00 9:35 im 
THE BLAIR WITCH PflOJeCT(fl) ' 

(11.05 1:10 3:15 520) 7:25 9.30 ■» 
OtCK{PO-13) ■ (2:15 4:25V 9:20 tm 

OEEP BLUE SEAWl (> W 7 00 i\0m 

INSPECTOR a*0OET(Pa)jil 10 1153 ISJ 151715 I20«m 
AMERICAN PIE (fl) 1240 2:55 5: 10) 7 25 9.40 UK 



♦ Nti Paiwi • No Pjm 
Im.i > VjinI f o. I ,1,1.1 , *,,.)...! I J LUll, 



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B6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKELIFE 



August 13, 1999 



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ANTIOCH 



MCHENRY WAUCONDA ROUND LAKE FOX LAKE 



(847)395-6230 (815)385-8630 (847)526-8877 (847)546-4862 (847)587-9333 



PROVENA SAINT 

THERESE MEDICAL 
CENTER 



Free laser vision 
correction seminar offered 

Walter Fried, MD, will offer a 
free seminar on laser vision cor- 
rection Wednesday, Aug. 18 from 
6:30 to 8 p.m. at Provena Saint; 
Therese Medical Center, 2615 
Washington St., Waukegan. A 
board-certified ophthalmologist, 
Dr. Fried will talk about how the 
procedure can reduce or elimi- 
nate your dependence on glasses 
and contact lenses. He will also 
be available to answer questions. 
Participants can also enter a 
drawing to win a free laser vision 
correction procedure (you must 
be present to register). To regis- 
ter for the Aug. 18 seminar, call 
1^888-869-1118. 

Eat with a Dietitian 

Aug. 17 from noon to 1 p.m. in 
the cafeteria at Provena Saint 
Therese Medical Center. Nutri- 
tional information will be given 
. by a registered dietitian. Seating Is 
limited. Cost is 99 cents for Senior 
Spirit members ($2.50 for non- 
members). To register, call (847) 
360-2172. 



VICTORY MEMORIAL 
HOSPITAL 

Blood Pressure Screenings 
and Recordings 

. From 10 aim. to 12 noon on Fri- 
day, August 13, free "Blood Pres- 
sure Screenings and Recordings" 
will be provided by Victory 
Memorial Hospital at Cub Food 
Store, North Lewis Avenue, 
Waukegan*. For information, call 
360-4246. 

parenting Class 

At 10 a r m. on Saturday, August . 
14, a "Parenting Class" will be 
presented by the New Family 
Center at Victory Memorial Hos- 
pital, 1324 North Sheridan Road, 
Waukegan. This class teaches 
skills essential to caring for a new 
baby. Included are bathing, feed- 
ing and safety of the infant, infant 
behavior, and family concerns. 
There is a $10 fee for the class. To 
register or for more information, 
call 360-4297, ext. 5218. 

Prostate Health Topic For 
Free Seminar 

At some point in their lives, 80 
percent of all men will be affected 
by a form of prostate disease. The 
Victory Surgery Center.and inde- 
pendent, board- certified physi- 
cians, invite the community to an 
Informal beverage and dessert 
discussion on prostate health. At 
"Prostate Health Concerns,'* urol- 
ogists Raza Khan, M.D., Harsh 
Kumar, M.D., and Robert Saffrin, 
M.D., and radiation oncologist 
YashbirMehta, M.D., will present 
information on prostate health, 
including prostatitis, enlarge 
prostate, and prostate cancer. 
"Prostate Health Concerns" will 
begin at 6 p.m. bn.Tuesday, Aug. 
17, in the Great Room of the Inde- 
pendent Living Center at the Vil- 
lage of Victory Lakes\.The center 
is located off Grand Aye. on the 
Victory takes campus at 1075 Vic- 
tory Drive, iindenhurst; To regis- 
ter for this this free health semi- 
nar, call l-800-843-2464i,between 
8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. 



LAKE FOREST 
HOSPITAL 



Breastfeeding Your Baby 

Join LFG's breastfeeding expert 
for a session devotedtb breast- 
feeding issues. Babies are wel- 

come.Nb fee. Call 234:6182. 

. . ■ < ■ 

Alzheimer's Support Group 

Meets the first Tuesday of each 
month from 7 to8 p.m. in the li- 
brary at Westmoreland. Call 295- 
3619, ext. 5982. 




August 13, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers / B7 



WTTW Channel 11 to premiere Realage with Dr. Roizen 



How old are you? How old do 
you want to be? What if you could 
look and feel younger? And what if 
It was a simple as flossing your 
teeth, eating tomato sauce and 
wearing a seat belt? WTTW Chan- 
j nel 11 announces the premiere of 
RealAge With Dr. Michael Roizen, 
a one-hour special highlighting 
the anti-aging health system from 
his best-selling book RealAge: Are 
you as young canbe? Channel 11 
will premiere the program on 
Monday, August 19. National dis- 
tribution is being considered for 
December 1999. 

Roizen, an internist, anesthe- 
siologist, professor of medicine 
and Chair of the Department of 
Anesthesia and Critical Care at the 
University of Chicago Pritzker 
School of medicine, designed the 
RealAge Age Reduction Plan®. His 
health program outlines behaviors 
that may actually take years off 
your biological age. In fact, Dr. 
Roizen' s individually tailored age- 
reduction program could make 
you live and feel up to 26 years 
younger. 

According to Roizen, 30 per- 
cent of aging is genetic. The other 
70 percent Is determined by erivi- . 
ronmentai and physical behaviors. 
After studying the effects of more 
than 100 behaviors'— from diet 
and medication to stress control 
and chronic smoking — Dr. 
Roizen converted the associated 
risks of behavior In to a single cur- 
rency— the rate of aging.' 

In this one-hour special, Dr. 
Roizen explains how to follow a 
personalized age-reduction plan 



using a wide range of methods, 
from quick fixes (using a helmet 
while bicycling), to moderately 
easy changes (avoiding sun expo- 
sure), all the way to the most diffi- 
cult changes (reducing stress in 
one's life). According to Dr. 
Roizen, this plan is tailored to 
your individual needs. Simply 
said, everyone has the ability to 
get younger. 

Roizen, a 53-year-old MD, 
who follows his own RealAge Age 
Reduction Plan®, calculates his 
own RealAge to be 38. 

RealAge with Dr. Michael 
Roizen is a production of The , 
Chicago Production Center at 
WTTW. Executive in Charge — ■ 
Mary Beth Hughes. Executive Pro- 
ducers—Frederick Schneider. Co- 
Executive Producer Tony Greco. 
Producer Patricia Fiedman. 

WTTW's Chicago Production 
center Is a division of Window to 
the World Communications, Inc., 
parent company to WTTW Chan- 
nel 1 1 and 98.7 WFMT. The Chica- 
go Production Center, one of mid- 
America's largest production facil- 
ities, produces local and national 
programming for public televi- 
sion. 

Chair of the Food & Drug Ad : 
ministration Advisory Committee, 
Dr. Roizen is also an editor or as- 
sociate editor for six medical jour- 
nals, and a former editor of the 
University of Chicago's Better 
Health Newsletter. He has pub- 
lished more than 120 peer re- 
viewed scientific papers, 100 text- 
book chapters, 25 editorials and - 
two medical books. 





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Dr. Michael Roben's RealAge methods will be aired as a one-hour 
special on Chicago's WTTvV, Channel 11. 



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Campaign aims to increase bicycle safety,, reduce traumatic head injuries 



Every year, thousands of peo- 
ple visit local emergency rooms 
as a direct result of bike-related 
crashes. Each year about 900 . 
people die from head injuries 
caused by falls that occur during 
these activities. Research shows 
that many of these fatalities 
could be avoided simply by 
wearing a helmet. 

Jiffy Lube International has 
announced that it is launching a 
national campaign to educate the 
public about the benefits of wear- 
ing protective headgear while cy- ■ 
cling and inline skating to reduce 
traumatic head injuries. 



As part of the campaign, J 
Lube is selling helmets through 
participating fast lube service cen- 
ters across the country. Special 
arrangements were made with 
SafeTech, a leading maker of bicy- 
cle helmets, to offer the helmets 
at 35 percent below the manu- 
facturer's suggested retail price. 
The helmets feature aerodynam- 
ic styling, ultra, lightweight 
comfort, a customized fit with 
an extra set of pads, and a quick 
release system. 

"Research has shown that 
head injuries are the primary 
cause of 80 percent of bike fa tali- 




Jes," said Dr. William J; WInslade, 
Jiffy Lube's spokesperson for the 
campaign and author of the book, 
"Confronting Traumatic Brain h> 
jury." 

Wearing a bicycle helmet re- - 
duces the risk of head injury by 85 
percent," he said 

Statistics show that 900 Amer- 
icans die each year in bicycle 
crashes. Children ages 10 to 14, 
especially males, have the highest 
death rate from bicycle-related 
head injuries. "Taking the lead on 
such an important campaign to , 
educate our customers about the 
benefits of wearing a helmet is 



part of Jiffy Lube's commitment to 
the health and well being of the 
communities where we live and 
work," said Jiffy Lube President 
Marc Graham. "We're confident 
that our efforts will help to reduce 
the number of head injuries that 
occur each year." 

. For information on how you 
can obtain your reduced cost pro- 
tective helmets visit your local jiffy 
Lube or check out the company 
website at: http:// 
www.jiflylube.com. ( 
Courtesy of Article Resource Associ- 
ation, www.aracopy.com, e-mail: 
info@aracopy.com. 



The simple, sweet pleasures 




HI folks." 

I wish I could take credit for 
what you are about to read, but I 
can't. My husband pulled this 
off of the internet and thought it 
was really cute. I agree and want, 
to share 1 1 with you. I would like 
to give credit to the writer, how- 
ever, there was no name at- 
tached to it. So, to whomever 
wrote this, credit Is due! Enjoy. 

My Resignation 

I am hereby officially tender- 
ing my resignation as an adult. I 
have decided I would like to ac- 
cept the responsibilities of an 8- 
year-old again. 

I want to go to McDonald's 
and think it's a four-star restau- 
rant I want to sail sticks across a 
fresh mud puddle and make rip- 
ples with rocks. I want to think 
that M&Ms are better than mon- 
ey because ybucan eat them. I 



*»*■■+** 



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PARENT'S 
PLACE 

tin Sherri Singer 



want to lie under a big oak tree 
and run a lemonade stand with 
my friends on a hot summer's 
day. 

I want to return to a time 
when life was simple. When all 
you knew were colors, multipli- 
cation tables and nursery 
rhymes, but that didn't bother 
you, because you didn't know 
what you didn't know and you 
didn't care! All you knew was to 
be happy because you were 
blissfully unaware of all the 
things that should make you 
worried or upset. 



I want to think that the world 
is fair. That everyone is honest 
and good. I want to believe that 
anything is possible. I want to be 
oblivious to the complexities of 
life and be overly excited by the 
little things again. 

I want to live simple again. I 
don't want my day to consist of 
computer crashes, mountains of 
paperwork, depressing hews; i 
how to survive more days in the 
month than there is money in 
the bank, doctor bills, gossip, ill- 
ness and loss of loved ones. 

I want to believe in the power 
of smiles, hugs a kind word, 
truth, justice, peace, dreams, the 
imagination, mankind and mak- 
ing angels inthe snew. 
. So. . . here's my checkbook • 
and my car keys, my credit card 
bills and my 401K statements. I 
am officially resigning from 
adulthood. And if you want to 



discussthis further, you'll have 
to catch me first, cause, Tag! 
You're it! 

: If we really want to, it is pos- 
sible for each and every one of us 
to appreciate these kinds of ! 
things as adults. We may not be ■ 
able to go back completely, but if 
we take time out to have the right 
focus, we can have those simple 
pleasures again. 

This column is for entertain- 
ment purposes only. Information 
in this column cannot and should 
not replace proper Psychological 
treatment. Dr. SherriSingerisa 
Licensed Clinical Psychologist, 
childhood behavior specialist and 
author of the hook, "Why kids 
misbehave! What every parent 
needs to know to keep their kids 
on the right track!" For an ap- 
pointment, please call (708) 962- 
2549. 



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SPOTLIGHT: 



Location: 

On the shores of Bluff Lake outside of 
Antioch at 25276 W. Crass Lake Rd. Also 
accessible from Bluff Lake. 

Telephone: 
(847) 395-9330 

Hours: 

Noon to 10 p.m. weekdays; noon to 1 1 

p.m. on Fri. and Sat.; and noon to 10 p.m. 

on Sun. 

Menu: 

BBQ Ribs, Crab Legs, Surf and Turf, Pork 

Chops, etc. 



HarbourClub 




ADVERTISEMENT 





Summer's in full swing and so is the fun 
at the Harbour Club at 25276 W. Crass 
Lake Rd., outside of Antioch, whether you 
are traveling by one of many local roads or 
on the water. 

Located on the scenic shores of Bluff 
Lake, dining with a beautiful lake view is a 
given, especially from the outdoor patio 
and the Tiki Bar. 
. The Harbour Club, opened since March, 



offers dining 

has parking for 20 boats, thus drawing a 
lot of marine traffic. 

The nautical decor and friendly profes- 
sional staff are an added plus for casual 
dining at its best. 

The menu is filled such delectable 
delights as Surf and Turf, Crab Legs, ork 
Chops, BBQ Ribs and much more. 
None of the mouth-watering entrees is 
featured because everything on the 




a view 



menu is outstanding. 

Lunch is served from noon to 5 p.m., 
seven days a week, with dinner served 
from 5 to 10 p.m. weekdays, until 1 1 p.m. 
on Friday and Saturday, and until 10 p.m. 
on Sunday. 

. The Harbour Club has two private din- 
ing rooms for that special occasion, one 
seating 90 and the other 45. For more 
information, call (847) 395-9330. 



' -7 

List your favorite HO 
monthly drawing to win a s 40 gift certificate. 



S restaurant for our 



Name: _____ 

Address: 

City/State/Zip: 
Phone: • 



Favorite Restaurant: 



Mail to: Lakeland Newspapers 
P.O. Box 268 • Grayslake, IL 60030 



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111 S. Hwy. 45 Grayslake 

(847) 548-8882 Fax: (847) 548-2822 



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GAME ROOM OPEN 



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KONDZIOLKA 



Join Us At The 






NUMBER 1 VOLLEYBALL FACILITY IN LAKE COUNTY WITH 3 LIGHTED COURTS 



THI 



ACORN 



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tkipav OPEN FOB BREAKFAST 9 am Saturday & Sunday 

Fish Fry Lunch Specials M-F 

SATURDAY Kitchen open Fri. & Sat. 'til midnight 




Jesse (gfaks 

Food & Drink PrimeRib 18490 W, Old Gages Lake Rd,, Gages Lake • (847) 223-2575 



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For tHe Entire Family 

Sunday, August 15, 1999 Noon to ????? 

Roast Pig - Corn on the Cob - Baked Beans 
SaladsGatore- Hot Dogs - Burgers 




• * EXPRESS,^ * ■ 



*+ 



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'A Aal 



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^ Lake County's Exclusive 
. Self-Serve Doq Wash 

full-Service Grooming 
^ (2 hr. turnaround) 

Healthy Pet Products 
b Dog Obedience 
Sessions - Alt Levels! 

VtSIT OUR BOOTH 

AT CURNEE DAYS! 




AII-U-Can~Eat 

Adults: Kids 4 to 10: Under 4: 
$6.50 $3,00 Free 



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FREE FOR ALL KIDS, PUNCH, POPCORN, PRETZELS 

RAFFLES fR£E 




f Bring your pet, wear your grubs/ 
and we'll show ydu'the rest! 

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'Less stress on your pet and 

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Clean, sate, fun environment. ■ 

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,-No mpremqssy bathrooms' 

or '.aching ;backsl : 

PMICES STMT AT $12 

750 South We. 21 
Gumeei |L^ >?«:' ■•, 

(847)918-9777 

..iHr».T-Th Hr** IT'S; Sol. 9<8c Sun. :\ j-5r 

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Music. 




Dancing 




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4 POOL TABLES, DARTS, OOLF AND BOWLING ; j 
VIDEO MACHINES, B LARGE SCREEN TVs 

Jlars Upper & Lower Level 
EXTRA LARGE Dance Hoor & Stage Area 



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Bfiff If '^T^iMjaTT'ITT ~> . 




MALE DANCERS 

Specializing in Bachelorette Parties 



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GRILL 

Pub & Eatery 

476 West Liberty Street, Wauconda 
(847) 526-0002 

Qiueawcujd., SIwzca and Qxcat SyztiaU 

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Northern Lake County's 
Hottest Nieht Club. 

Featuring some of the grcdtcst bonds. 
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We Have 



on Sunday 



Bloody Marys *l w 
Mon. Bud & Bud Light tappers 75* 
Tues. Mudslides. , 2 w 

PBR Cans/1 00 
Wed, Domestic Bottles M 00 
Thurs. Miller Cans 'l 00 / Open Jam 



HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 7 am -Close, Sun. 11 am- Close 
3B498 N. Sheridan Road • Beach Park, IL • (847) 244-4991 




Dining on the Lake 



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;Qii Diamond lake 

ARqmtallon for Fine Food, Spirit! and Hdspitalltyoh Beautiful 

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.*;A.Cn«ial,CouhyyAtro^V tre Sjjg^lUhgIn t 

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LUNCH AND DINNMR 

PARTY AND BANQUET, FACILITIES (30 - 160) ■ 






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l\ VMd «««nl KT mx fcy 4« Hcrtkfi MMii fee** 

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Monday Night Special 1 LAM - 10 PM 

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B10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



COMMUNITY 



August 13, 1998 



The American Century exhibit of a lifetime 



Charles Lindbergh's flight suit 
worn during his historic May, 
1927 New York to Paris flight. A 
wheelchair used by President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt, the death 
masks of Sacco and Vanzetti. 
George Gershwin's baton. 
William Faulkner's typewriter. 
The Supreme Court robes of Jus- 
tice Thurgood Marshall. John F. 
Kennedy's undelivered speech of 
November 22, 1963. James 
Dean's motorcycle. A Patriot mis- 
sile from the Gulf War. Walt Dis- 
ney's Oscar for Mickey Mouse. 
The original manuscript of Hem- 
ingway's Snows of Killimanjaro. 
The world's first video game. 

Bullet riddled hats worn by 
Bonnie and Clyde on the last day 
of their lives. Twisted office 
equipment taken from the rubble 
of the Oklahoma City Federal 
Building. Baseballs signed by 
Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, and Jackie 
Robinson. Woodrow Wilson's top 
hat worn at the Versailles Peace 
Conference. Hugh Hefner's paja- 
mas. 

The desk on which Margaret 
Mitchell wrote Gone With The 
Wind. The original texts of Ronald 
Reagan's "Tear Down This Wall" 
speech and Lyndon Johnson's 
March 31, 1968 withdrawal from 
that year's Presidential contest. A 
nuclear warhead. Ajacketwornby 
Jlmi Hendrix. First class furnish- 
ings from the Titanic. The stop 
watch used by Orville and Wilbur 
Wright to time the world's first 
successful air flight in 1903. 



What is it? 

These are among nearly 500 
historic artifacts, documents, cos- 
tumes and other items assembled 
from over one hundred institutions 
and individuals to form The Ameri- 
can Century, the largest display in 
the history of America's presiden- 
tial libraries, running exclusively at 
the Gerald R. Ford Museum in 
Grand Rapids, Michigan, through 
October 17, 1999. 

Beginning in the museum's lob- 
by, a 32 foot long mural of down- 
town Grand Rapids circa 1900, in- 
troduces visitors to what is, in ef- 
fect, a walk through the twentieth 
century. Overhead a one-quarter 
scale model of the first Wright 
Brothers airplane is suspended 
above a Model T and early bicycle, 
William McKinley's White House 
rocking chair, a passport used by 
Margaret Sanger, and Harry Tru- 
man's World War I uniform. 

Nearby, a flagpole sitter from the 
Twenties ushers visitors into the 
. decade that roared. The biology text- 
book that sparked the celebrated 
Scopes' Monkey Trial is on display, 
along with Scott Fitzgerald's hip 
flask, Louis Armstrong's trumpet, 
and costumes from the original 1927 
production of Showboat. Elsewhere, 
visitors can stand on a ship at Pearl 
Harbor, encounter residents of 
Japanese internment camps, and en- 
ter a recreated movie palace to see a 
century's worth of Hollywood's 
greatest moments. 

A 1950s fallout shelter and an 
enormous mural of Levittown serve 



as backdrops for Elvis Presley, 
Mamie Eisenhower, and - what else - 
aLa-Z-Boyrecliner. the history of ra- 
dio and television are traced in detail. 
So Is the rise of suburban life and the 
origins of the modern civil rights 
movement. Whites Only signs that 
once limited access to water foun- 
tains and restrooms are displayed 
beside the Rev. Martin Luther King's 
1957 telegram to the Elsenhower 
White House expressing gratitude for 
Ike's use of federal troops to integrate 
Little Rock's Central High School. 

There is a field uniform from 
Vietnam, primitive computers and 
early packaging from McDonald's 
and other consumer giants. 
Silkscreens by Andy Warhol hang 
near letters to the Fords from Glo- 
ria Steinem, Mr. Rogers' sweater 
and sneakers, Sesame Street's Bert 
and Ernie, a hockey stick used by 
Wayne Gretzky, and handwritten 
notes from President Carter's ne- 
gotiations at Camp David which 
led to a landmark agreement be- 
tween Egypt and Israel. 

The exhibit's concluding section 
unfolds beneath a forest of oversized 
tabloid covers and in front of a 
fullscale replica of the Unabomber's 
cabin. Artifacts here relate to the 
Gulf War and acts of terrorism in- 
cluding the World Trade Center and 
Oklahoma City bombings. On a 
lighter note, Barry Sanders' football 
jersey, Forest Gump's movie fatigues, 
and a bat Cal Ripkin Jr. used the day 
he broke the record for most consec- 
utive games played (and later pre- 
sented to President Clinton) are on 






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Charles Llnbergh's flight suit will be among 500 artifacts in the 
American Century display at the Ford Museum. 



display. 

How was it 
put together? 

Working off a 60,000 word 
script written down by Museum 
Director Richard Norton Smith, 
Curator James Kratsas, Registrar 
Don Holloway, and Exhibit Spe- 
cialist Bettina Demetz undertook a 
vast scavenger hunt, locating hun- 
dreds of historically significant 
items before negotiating their 
loan, transportation, exhibition 



and return. The result is a once- 
in-a-century event-made even 
more significant by the recent ad- 
dition to the Ford Museum of the 
steel staircase that once stood atop 
the old U.S. Embassy in Saigon. 
When the building was demol- 
ished last summer, the stairway 
was preserved for permanent exhi- 
bition in Grand Rapids, where it 
complements a large slab from the 
Berlin Wall as a symbol of the, un- 
quenchable human desire for free- ; 
dom. 



Disney Daytona Adventure getaway 



Your 7 day 5 night Orlando/Day- 
tona Florida Vacation includes: 

Your vacation begins with four 
days three nights in the vacation cap- 
ital of the world, Orlando, Florida. 
You'll stay in luxury in the heart of the 
attraction area at Orlando area resort, 
near the main entrance to Walt Dis- 
ney World. Upon Check in you will re- 
ceive our VIP coupon book valued at 
over $500 featuring 2 for 1 meals at the 
most popular restaurants, up to 50% 
shopping discounts and free greens 
fees at area golf courses. Also you will 
receive the best discounts on Disney, 
Universal Studios, Sea World, and wa- 
ter park attraction tickets. You will 
have the connivance of being near 
Universal Studios and Sea World and 
don't forget the water slide park such 
as River Country, Water Mania and 
Wet n' Wild. You are going to have a 
great time! One evening you will dine 
at Orlando's #1 diner theatre, Arabian 
Knights featuring prime rib, ultimate 
beer, wine and soft drinks and their 
world famous horse show. After the 
excitement of Orlando, you'll relax for 
3 days and 2 nights at the world fa- 
, mous Daytona Beach. Not only do 
you have beautiful sunsets: you can go 
deep-sea fishing, go to the races or just 
bathe on the beach, or poolside. A 
beautiful Daytona Beach resort is 
where you'll be staying. It is an 
Olympic size heated swimming pool, 



Jacuzzi, Shuffleboard, game room, 
beach volleyball, poolside bar and 
children's activity program. Upon 
arrival you will receive 2 tickets to 
Daytona's brand new water park, Ad- 
venture Landing. there's 
more...While in Daytona you'll board 
the SunCruz Casino for a day or 
evening cruise, you'll enjoy free cock- 
tails, live entertainment and dancing. 
The ship sails from Ponce inlet just 10 
minutes south of Daytona Beach. If 
you have not been on a cruise before 
it's just like the Loveboat that was on 
TV! 

This vacation can be taken any- 
time within the next 12 months. .The 
Daytona and Orlando vacations can 
be taken together or. This offer is only 
available during this corporate sellout 
It is only available to all your employ- 
ees, families, and associates. This cor- 
porate rate is only $149.00 per person. 
Based upon double occupancy. Up to 
four people can travel at no extra cost 
This price includes the vacation listed 
above. WITH NO HIDDEN COSTS. A 
hotline has been established for your 
immediate response, Only one call 
per household, these vacations won't 
last long. If lines are busy keep trying 
and remain patient mat's right 
$298.00 for2to4 adults or2adults and 
3 children!!! 

For more information please call 
800-454-39-02 ext 43. ■ 



Twenty-five bulls expected in full 
antler is at Dells new attraction 



$&• ; 



For the first time, visitors to Wis- 
consin Dells can visit Nanchas Elk 
Ranch, a working ranch with more 
than 85 elk and 160 acres of scenic 
rolling hills. Founded in 1994, Nan- 
chas owners Nancy and Charlie 
Fochs received so many curious vis- 
itors that they decided to add their 
family-owned ranch as one of the 
unique, educational attractions 
available In Wisconsin Dells. 

"People are naturally curious, es- 
pecially when it comes to animals 



they haven't had much exposure to, 
We're, offering guests an opportuni- 
ty to not only see live elk in a scenic 
setting, but also view video footage 
that has never before been captured 
by anyone," said Charlie Fbchs, own- 
er of Nanchas Elk Ranch. 

For more information about the 
Nanchas Elk Ranch, or to receive a 
free Travel & Attraction Guide, con- 
tact the Wisconsin Dells Visitor & 
Convention Bureau at 1-800-223- 
3557 orvisitwww.wisdeIls.com. 




MINDING 
YOUR OWN 




Don Taylor 



Learning from or 





Its your choice 

(Last of a two-part 
series) 



ast week I discussed failure 
and told you tha t you have a 
choice when you fail. You 
can, learn from your/mis- 
takes and go on to bigger and better 
things or, you can decide to wallow : 
in your failures and drown In your 
own self-pity. 

This column is devoted to those of 
you who have or are failing, but 
choose not to be a failure. You are 
ready to put your failures behind 
you and get on with your life. 

Failure beaters 

• Dont quit trying. I'm not sure I 
can give you a sure-fire formula for 
success, but I can give you the 
guaranteed formula for failure: quit 
trying. 

The great writer and speaker, Og 
Mandinp, said, "So long as there is 
breath in me, that long will I persist 
For now I know one of the greatest 
'principles of success; if I persist 
long enough I will win." Very often 
those who achieve great success are 
those who tried one more time af- : 
ter others gave up. 

• Don't make excuses. Those 
who fail and try to find someone to 
blame are always too busy to see 
the lesson of the game. Don't seek 
an excuse; reach out for a remedy, r 
seek a solution and look for the les- 
son. 

•Don't look back. Reliving past 
mistakes won't change the out- 
come. What's done is done. Don't 
focus on past failures or you will 
sink in the mire of self-doubt._ 
No one can make much forward 
progress if they keep looking back. 
Usually, someone who looks back a 
lot runs into more trouble up 
ahead. So let your failures go, and 
focus oh your future. 
•Don't pull In, reach out Let 
those you love who are close to you 
help you absorb the pain of failure. 
Use them to help you cope with the 
adversity and get beyond it. Let 
them help you see the opportunity 
failure always presents. 
I know a professional speaker who 
was downsized from his job of 
nearly 25 years. His family encour- 
aged him to pursue his dream of 
professional speaking. He did, and 
today he commands daily speaking 
fees higher than his previous 
monthly salary. 

• Learn from past mistakes. 
Failure isn't worthless unless we let 
the lesson slip away. I still fail. 
When I do I ask myself two ques- 
tions. First, how did this situation J 
occur? And, second, what is the 
lesson I'm supposed to learn from 
it? 

A few years ago I hired ah employee 
who turned out to be a complete 
and terrible failure at the job. After 
I convinced the person involved 
that we weren't going to work this 
ane out, I asked myself just how 
this happened. In analyzing the 
problem, I found that I hadn't tak- 
en the time to thoroughly investi- 
gate the employee's background. 
We needed help, right now and I 
had taken a stranger's word as 
truth. 

What I learned was the importance 
of taking time to find the right per- 
son for the job. I learned to sched- 
ule more than one interview, care- 
fully check references - not just the 
ones on the resume - and to test for 

Please seeTAYLQR IBll 




August 13, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers B1 1 



CLC costs up 3.92%; new budget $47.5 




Besides being an educational in- 
stitution, College of Lake County is a 
major business enterprise where the 
operating budget for fiscal 2000 will 
be a tidy $475 million. 

lust adopted following a public 
hearing, the budget represents a 3.92' 
percent increase in expenfltures. 

"This reflects Increases in 
salaries, medical insurance, equip- 
ment campus maintenance and op- 
eration cost," said Peter Krupczak, 
vice-president of administrative af- 
fairs and college's chief financial of- 
ficer. Also included, he said; are 



costs associated with equipping, re- 
modeling and operating the expand- 
ed Southlake educational Center In 
Vernon Hills. 

The balanced budget reflects in- 
creases in state apportionment and 
property taxes, earnings from invest- 
ments and revenue from a $l-per- 
credit-hour tuition increase. The to- 
tal tax rate for the next year will re- 
. main at 22 cents per $100 of Equal- 
ized Assessed Value, Krupczak not- 
ed. •/• 

Trustees adopted a resolution of 
intent to issue $2.8 million in limited 



tax bonds to cover the college's costs 
for early retirement incentives, tech- 
nology acquisition and the issuance 
of the bonds. A public hearing on the 
bond sale will be held at 6:45 p.m. 
Aug. 24 at the Grayslake Campus. 

The board adopted a resolution 
to submit Life Safety Projects to the 
Illinois Community College Board 
for $500,000 to improve college facil- 
ities. The projects consist of roadway 
drainage improvements and the 
purchase of a generator to provide 
and uninterrupted power source. 

Grants totaling SI. 46 million 



from the Illinois State Board of Edu- 
cation was accepted. The funds 
will support the college's adult ed- 
ucation programs, technology en- 
hancement, equipment purchases 
and training and recruitment for 
career and technical programs. 
The board also accepted two 
grants totaling $137,000 from the^. 
Illinois Department of Commerce 
and Community Affairs to contin- 
ue the services provided by the 
Small Business Development Cen- 
ter and the Procurement Techni- 
cal Assistance Center. 



Managing your boss: 10 ways 
to make your life easier 



Let's face It, whether your boss Is 
enjoyable or abominable to work for, 
he or she plays a large part'in our day- 
to-day lives. Employees who want to 
enhance their working environment, 
reduce their stress and move ahead in 
their careers need to learn ho to man- 
age their bosses. 

"It is a relatively simple skill which 
can do wonders, not just to improve, 
your own stress ad your career ad- 
vancement, but your boss' too," ex- 
plains Carlo Martellbrd, Area Sales Di- 
rector, In the Downers Grove office of 
Drake Beam Morin (DBM), the 
world's leading provider of human re- 
source solutions in employee selec- 
tion, development, retention, and 
transition. "After all, frequently your 
success depends on your boss', suc- 
cess. 

DBM offers the following tips to 
help employees get the best out of 
their working relationships and im- 
prove their own career prospects: 

1. Don't Imagine you can change 
your boss. Instead, play to his or her 
strengths and seek to counterbalance 
any weaknesses. 

2. Ask what you and your team can ' 
do to make your boss' job easier. Ask 
what you do now that makes his or 
her job harder. 

3. Don't assume you know the an- 
swer to the questions in point 2. Lis- 



ten with an open mind and act upon 
the answers. 

4. Find out how your boss likes to 
be given information — informal 
briefings, memos, detailed meetings 
or broad overviews. Do what suits the 
boss best 

5. Make your boss feel part of the 
team by involving him or her in ap- 
propriate group discussions. Your 
boss will be pleased that you value his 
or her input 

6. Never let your boss encounter a 
surprise, especially in front of others. . 
It makes him or her appear out of 
touch, so keep him/her briefed on 
significant developments. 

7. Agree with your boss about 
where your efforts will be focused and 
where they will not That way he/she 
will have realistic expectations of 
what you can achieve" 

8. Never underestimate your boss, 
however frustrated you may be with 
his/her performance. 

\9. Remember that your boss also 
has people to answer to. it.rhay.be 
shareholders_ or customers, , but 
anything you can do to help him or 
her to be successful will enhance 
tlie image of the whole team, and 
reflect well oh your career 
prospects. 

10. Your boss is, after all, only hu- 
man. Never Forget itl • 



TIF to aid second site 
for Stack-On Products 



New dean for business joins CLC 



Richard Haney is the new dean of 
business and industry services at the 
College of Lake County. 

Haney was director of the Cen- 
ter, for Training Innovations at 
Belleville Area College for the past 
three years. ' 

Prior to that he served as work- 
force training program manager at 
Parkland College in Champaign, for 
six years! He holds a bachelor's de- 
gree in political science from South- 
em Illinois University at Carbondale 
and a master's degree in education 
from the University of Illinois at 
Champaign. He will begin his duties , 

Bedding firm 
finds home in 
Lake County 

Nostalgia Home Fashions, Inc. 
has acquired 3.05 acres in Vernon 
Hills for development of a 50,000 
square foot build-to-suit industrial 
warehouse/distribution and office 
facility. The company, which makes 
and distributes bedding such as bed- . 
spreads, quilts, pillow shams and 
dust ruffles, chose South Lake Coun- 
ty for its convenient location to the 
tollway and airport and for the up- 
scale character of the Parke. The site 
is in Continental Executive Park. 



on Sept 15. 

The CLC board also approved the 
hiring of Sonia Crosier as assistant 
director for training and develop- 
ment Additionally, the board ap- 
proved the hiring of three full-time 
faculty members: Terry Dixon, com- 
puter art; Ellen Dykeman, computer 
information systems; and Lynn 
Platz, medical Imaging. 

The board approved a contract 
with Lori J. Drummer as a consultant 
to develop curriculum and secure 
accreditation to begin a dental hy- 
giene program at CLC in the fall 2000 
semester. 



With help from a tax-favored sta- 
tus, Stack-On Products of Waucon- 
da will construct a 100,000-square- 
foot facility in Zion. 

Utilizing 15 acres of a 31 -acre 
site, Stack-On will also build a 
100,000-squafe-foot distribution 
center. 

The Zi on council is creating a tax 
increment financing (TIF) district 
to aid the business that originated 
30 years ago in Round Lake. The 
company moved to Wauconda af- 
ter outgrowing quarters in Round 



Lake in a remodeled creamery. 

John Lynn, Stack-On president 
and sole stockholder, said about 15 
acres will be sold for other industri- 
al development 

The site is at the comer of 21st 
and Kenosha Rd. 

Land, currently valued at ap- 
proximately $30,000 per acre with 71 
agriculture zoning, includes exten- 
sive wetlands. 

Stack-On will employ 125 at the 
facility. The company manufac- 
tures metal tool storage cabinets. 



Suburban office rated in nation 



-The,- top - Chicago-area 
RE/MAX brokerage again this 
year is RE/MAX Suburban, which 
has seven offices located -In Ar- 
lington Heights, Glen Ellyn, Lib-, 
ertyville, Mt. Prospect, Schaum- 



burg and Wheaton. 

Owned and operated by bob 
Baker and Jim Nelson, it ranked 
92nd In the nation for the second 
consecutive. year, closing 5,172 
transaction sides in 1998. 




Watery greeting 

A subdivision of 171 single-family homes Is laying claim to the 
most elaborate entry of any development in northern Illinois. 
Squire's Mill visitors are greeted by a rustic gatehouse and two 
waterfalls. The development is In southwest suburban Shore- 
wood. 



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B 1 2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



BUSINESS/REAL ESTATE 



August 13,1999 



: 



REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS 

Below arc real estate transactions for villages in and around the Lakeland 
Newspapers circulation area, listed arc the property address, property buyer, 
and purchase price. 



Antioch 



40029 Hidden Bunker, Antone J Hen- 

riqucs, $104,822 

3881 1 Lakeside PI, John Zlclinski, $95,000 

40020 N Hidden Bunker, Craig Morr & 

Jennifer Alolsio, $123,025 

40022 N Hidden Bunker, Robert Bolin & 

Donna Van Bogaert, $125,265 

40026 N Hidden Bunker, Michael T Cas- 
s!dy, $103,375 

40027 N Hlddenbunker, Albert & Elsa 
Dobbcck, $120,800 

94 Oakwood Dr, Kenneth 1 & Danjean R 

Savage, $113,200 

,851 Pine Hill Dr, Timothy NIxom & Unda 

Nixon, $165,000 

9B4 Victoria, Lee & Diane Perry, $160,000 

984 Victoria St, John S & Elizabeth J Boltik, 

$189,000 

22877 W Lake Shore Dr, Michael J Broker 

IU, $270,000 

41450WWestIakcAve, DennntsAOcwic- 

ja, $5,000 

Eralake 

207 E Grand Ave, Dale & Lisa Aronson, 

$79,200 

82 Fores t Ave, Shcri L Leese & Allan J Rode, 

$154,501 

7205 Hastings, Norma Elwell, $120,000 

22 MIneola Rd, Roy F Hoffman, $98,500 

48 N Forest, Orin L & Marylee K Gibbons, 

33 S Elm St, Paul Krajevvski & Trudy A 

Lauer, $160,500 

46Tremont, Betty Jean Macaluso, $79,000 

Cages Lake 

18638 Wright, Jacob Roberts, $107,000 
Cravalake , 

529 Barron, Daniel D & Shari B Dalziel, 
$128,000 

316 Fairfax Ln, Lawrence Muscolino, 

#77,000 

522 Fairfax Ln, Edward & Darlene Tem- 

plcton, $218,000 

1669 Fairport, Brad Lemer& Karen Olson, 

$220,000 

492 Hampshire Ct, Stanley J & Sandra D 

Dixon, $220,000 

530 Harvey Ave, James Moltdor, $247,000 
18720 Heather Ct, Robert Hanhart, 
$226,000 



1118 Hummingbird Ln, Christopher & 
Tracy L Ccleslle, $203,000 
99 Kecncland, Brian Siem &Tlna Scudd- 
la, $141,326 

76 Kecncland Ct, Lisa Ross, $126,61 1 
255 LIndscy, M Nell & Maria B Hebb, 
$348,000 

1354 Longchomps Ct, Indira & Kevin Han- 
Icy, $145,898 

1356 Longchamps Ct, Jeffrey & Krista 
Schumow, $129,825 

1358 Longchamps Ct, Thomas & Linda 
Luchen, $127,124 

786 Oakmeadow Ct, Jennifer Brecken- 
ridge & Susan Dorscy, $217,750 
17200 W Woodland Dr, Robert & Christine 
Glcason, $162,000 

183 Wcsterfield PI, David R Thomas, 
$173,500 

437 Yorkshire Ct, Michael Roussin & 
StaceyDailey, $217,000 

Green Oaks 

28975 Baker Rd, Harry L Schroeder Jr, 

$535,000 

1240 E Park Ave, Ann Damlanow, 

$270,000 

1985 Lexington Rd, Bradley A & Susan A 

Kramer, $373,000 

14222 W Buckley Rd, Village Of Green 

Oaks, $730,000 

14051 W Maplewood Ct, VIadimlr'& Julia 

Perchak, $292320 

Garage 

2202 Cardinal Ct, Vance J & Margaret D 
Bedford, $289,000 

565 Clifford Ln, Julie KBurton & Rex A Pe- 
tit, $292,000 

4025 Harper Ave, Christopher L& Gina M 
Winlewlcz, $188,600 

2473 Lawson, Bruce L Freeman, $193,500 
3623 Lee Ave, Kristl Erin Loucks, $260,000 
18454 N Rae Ln, Emilia Ctobanu, $130,000 
36259 North Goldspring Ct, Donald 
Roszak, $214,999 

7037 S Stratten Dr 03a, Federal Home 
Mortgage Corp, $126,000 
1601 Samuel Ct, Susan R & Celvin M 
Adamson, $163,405 

1606 Samuel Ct, Ayesha A & Hamlo J 
Ahmed, $145,845 



933 Taylor Dr, Julie A Houser, $92,000 

650 Whitney Ct #208, Ema J Colum, 

$92,000 

670 Williamsburg Ave, Eric & Patricia 

Bachtol, $332,000 

HaincsviUe 

347 E Big Horn Dr, James Yanecck, 
$2,129,000 

Hawthorn Woods 

13 Lancelot, Cecil H Pretty & Rachel R Pe- 
ters, $3 19,900 

Ingles! dc '_ 

140 Longwood Dr, Christine L Sanko, 

$145,000 

26466 Vincent Ct, David Bushing, 

$100,000 

27891 W Bayview Dr, Stephen & Patricia 

Millea, $250,000 

26280 W Vista Ct, Frank H Daulcr, 

$138314 

26284 W Vista Ct, Lisa Maria Brothers, 

$143,668 

take Villa 

308 Hampton Ct, Patrick & Margarctte Fir- 
man, $210,180 

405 Hampton Dr, Nancy L Winflcld, 
$250,320 

540 Huntington Clr, Eugene & Debbie 
Donaghey, $235,552 

18732 MeadowGrassDrJeffreyP&Anna 
MOndrako, $252,000 
709 Park Ave, Scott L & Kristinc A Herbert, 
$192,685 

712 Park Ave, Charles J & Mary K Lopardo, 
$242,602 

485 Park Ave B2, Louis & Krista Dlberardl- 
no, $89,000 

2549B W Chesney Dr, Nlckclos R Smith, 
$152,440 

20956 W Genoa, Gary Cross & Jill Reiner, 
$139,000 

820 Woodhlll Ct, Michael & Sheedy 
Michel]; $181,900 

UbertyvUle ; 

1121 Abbey Ct, Michael & Elizaabeth Kite, 
$247,500 

715 Ascot Ct, Michael & Hedy Duggan, 
$244,500 

442 Briar PI, Rebecca Brufck, $162,500 
1038 Graccwood Dr, John & Marcia 
Mount Shoop, $342,000 
218 N First St, Donald E & Debra A Walk- 
er, $180,500 

1505 Old Bam Clr, Rex Norris, $4 15,000 
1931 S Falem Dr, Tom & Becky Hender- 
son, $299,645 

1977 S Hawk Ct, Timothy & Unda M Mc- 
Carthy, $319,550 



1036 Shari Ln, Timothy P & Lisa R Mc- 

cautcy, $236,000 

17037 WCunnlngham Ct, John E&Susan 

M Wilherspoon, $165,500 

17113 WCunnlngham St, Leo & Victoria 

Korlar, $168,925 

Iindenhurat 

2601 Constitution Dr, Rlcardo & Kristlna 

Ongkiko, $200,223 

2651 Constitution Dr, Richard & Jane Ko- 

rienck, $216,972 

2670 Constitution Dr, Brian & Karen Ende, 

$212,828 

2680 Constitution Dr, Sergen & Ludmila 
Tedn, $206,580 

2681 Constitution Dr, Daniel & Deborah 
Amend, $246,987 

3012 E Liberty, Jeffrey J Gorton, $212,000 
310 ETonagerCir, Restltuto & Maria Da- 
han, $223,162 

2876 Falling Waters Ln, Amy D Dressen, 
$136,948 

2654 Franklin Ct, Samuel & Cindy Simp- 
son, $233,323 
. 513 HlllcrcstLn, Daniel J Camasta& Susan 
B Yates, $166,711 

1900 Ivy Ct, Shirley D Dworak, $155,000 
360 Kestrel Ln, Michete C Kolczaski, 
$183,833 

265 Meadowlark Clr, Mark Steinberg, 
$233,547 

452 Mockingbird Ct, Gregory & Sherry 
Perry, $215,000 

2104-Old Elm Rd, Scott D & Nichole R Kel- 
ley, $133,000 

445 Red Rock Dr, Fernando & Julia Or- 
pano, $246,000 

209 S Countryside Ln, Jennifer Mosele, 
$161,500 

320 Tanagcr Ln, Blaine & Barbara Bowers, 
$211,172 

295 W Tanagcr Clr, Dale fit Angela Forbes, 
$275,517 

2113 Witchwood, Rebecca Connolly & 
Donald Cosier, $109,000 

Mundeletn 

1245 D Ballantrae PI, Michael J Hiser, 
$98,000 

164 S Lincoln, Marclal & Bertha A Ro- 
driguez, $142,500 

1921 Somerset Ln, James A & Lynn A Lo- 
erop, $257,000 

209 W Hawthorne, James Hoferitza, 
$189,000 

21353 W Pacston Ct, Thomas & Lisa Nick. 
$138,000 

689 Waverly, Dorota fie AndrzeJ Pytlak, 
$258,000 



Round Lake Beach 



HOB Crescent Ct, Robert W & Elizabeth A 
Sommersi $106,000 

974 DcerTrall, Clarissa M & David WMer- 
rill, $171,500 

71 E Rustic Ln, Deborah fit Michael Tar- 
row, $96,200 

1614 Leslie, Alberto Martinez & Antlnlno 
Cortorcas, $124,500 

616 London Ct, Rivera Gilbert, $137,500 
2185 N Chcswick Ct, Ken Strauss & Luz 
Jnramillo, $177,695 

2178 N Stonehcdge Ct, John F fit John E 
Straszynskl,$160,120 
2221 NStonehengeCt, Tiffany MorrisCar- 
son & Kenny Carson, $154,132 
2519 N Stratford Ln, Sean & Amy Camp- 
bell, $181,400 

55 W Dahlia Ln, Sec Of Veterans Affairs, 
$154427 

919 WHillwoodCr, Katherine fit Raymond 
Misncr, $105,000 

Round Lake Heights _ 

721 Tomahawk Trail, Thomas Benscn & 

Rose M Benson, $88,000 

Round Lake Park 



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515 Arbor, John K Sanchez, $64,000 
Wfldswnrth __ — __ 

2B08 N Southern Hills Dr, Terry L & Sldnye 
R Couch, $156,270 

4747 W Pebble Beach Dr, Frank J Srejma 
Jr & Lisa R Srejma, $313,448 

Wauconda . 

413 Clearview Avw, David D Hudson, 
$176,000 

803 Grand Blvd, Larry P Maddock, 
$165,000 

1085 Jessica Dr, Charles D & Carol A Lu- 
cas, $243,000 

. 685 Laurel Ave, Chrystie G Miller & John P 
Sdmeca, $128,500, 
28748 N Monroe, Jake Masselter, $1 35,625 



Information provided by Record 
Information Services, Inc. in St. 
Charles. The company provides pub- 
lic record data for Lake, DuPage, 
Cook, Kane, McHenry, Kendall and 
\Vill counties including new incor- 
porations, business licenses, bank- , 
ruptcies, foreclosures, judgments, 
mechanic liens, state and federal tax v 
liens, residential and commercial' 
real estate transfers, building per.-. . 
mits, DUI arrests, divorce reports, 
sheriff sale foreclosures, (630) 365- 
6490, public-record.com. 



ON THE MOVE 

Donald N. Boyce of Lake For- 
est and chairman of the board of 
Index Corp. has been named to 
Rochester (N.Y.) Institute of Tech- 
nology's Board of Trustees. Boyce, 
is a 1967 RIT alumnus with his B.S. 
in business administration. He re- 
cently retired as president and 
CEO oflNDEX corp. where he re- 
mains board chairman. 



nator and closer. Hahn attends 
McHenry Community-College 
where she is currently working to- 
ward an associates degree in gen- 
eral education. 



Jennifer A. Hahn has been 
promoted to office manager at 
Chicago Ti- 
tle Insur- 
ance Com- 
pany's Lake 
Zurich of- 
fice. In her 
new posi- 
tion, Hahn 
will be re- 
sponsible 
for oversee- 
ing the clos- 
ing and new 
construc- 
tion depart- 
ments, as well as conducting clos- 
ing and handling general manage- 
rial duties. Hahn has worked for 
Chicago Title since 1992, previous- 
ly as an order clerk, closing coordi- 




First National Bank, Antioch 
and Gurnee, announces the addi- 
tion of 
Heather 
Heisel- 
mannto 
it's staff. 
Heisel- 
mann is 
from Pad- 
dock Lake, 
Wis. and 
has joined 
the Univer- 
sal Teller 
Depart- 
ment. She 
will be working at FNBEO's Anti- 
och facility. 




Heiselmann: 

New addition to 

First National 

Bank 



Hahn: Manager 

at Chicago Title 

Insurance 



Susan Malo of Fox Lake has 
joined Equitable/Rotter & Associ- 
ates as a registered representative 
in the Northbrook office. Prior to 
coming to Equitable, Mrs. Malo 
held the position of Vice President 
of Sales/ Marketing with Aon Cor- 
poration. She graduated with a 
bachelor of Arts from Willamette 
University in Salem, Oregon. 



FROM PAGE Cll 

TAYLOR: Failure can be 
a valuable leavning tool 



"claimed" skills. I may make other 
hiring mistakes, but I won't repeat 

■■'. that one. 

A •Think success. 
Focus on your future, 

!£ if there's failure in your past. 
Focus on success, 
and the failure will not last. 

You can be a winner, 



you do not have to lose. 
So choose to be successful, 
because you have the right to 
choose. 

Don Taylor is the co-author of Up 
Against the Wal-Marts. You may 
write to him in care of Minding 
Your Own Business, PO Box 67, 
Amarillo, TX 79105. 




\t 



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SUMMER HOME & GARDEN 



August 13, 1999 




SUMMER 1 

99 



Choose building materials that Qan withstand the weather 

N 



ow that El Niflo is all but a distant 
memory, weather forecasters are 
bracing for what probably will be 
a return to normal weather pat- 
terns across the United States. For many 
coastal regions, that means the return of 
hurricanes which, for all intents and pur- 
poses, took a year off from making their an- 
nual trek through the Atlantic and Gulf 
Coast regions. . 

If El Niflo taught us anything, it's that unpre- 
dictable weather can strike at any time, in 
any part of the country. So, if you're thinking 
of fixing up or remodeling your home this 
fall, consider building products that can 
withstand the elements — especially when 
It comes to re-roofing your home. If you 
don't do it right the first time, you'll end up 
paying for it again, and again, and again. 

Instead of a quick fix with a low-quality 
shingle, consider roofing materials that are 
built to withstand the elements, particularly 
high winds. A little education about your 

* roofing purchase can mean the difference 

* between admiring the durability of your 
roof after a storm or picking up shingle 
pieces out of your neighbor's pool. 

How to Identify 
quality shingles 

How can you be more Informed about 
your shingle purchase without getting out 
the chemistry book? First, you need to know 



what you don't want your shingles to do — 
blow off, crack or tear during severe weather 
conditions. A shingle's ability to withstand 
cracking and tearing are the most important 
benchmarks for measuring its quality. 

The highly respected American Society 
for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has devel- 
oped voluntary guidelines (standard D3462) 
for shingle performance in varying weather 
conditions with regard to tear resistance. 
While meeting these guidelines can help as- 
sure you of a quality product, it does not 
guarantee total problem prevention. 

Underwriters Laboratories (UL) backs 
this up by independently testing shingles 
and certifying whether they meet the ASTM 
requirements. This is your guarantee and 
proof that the shingles you are buying meet 
ASTM's high standards. 

Don't let your shingles blow away 

In recent years, the severity of the 
storms that have hit the United States, espe- 
cially in coastal regions, have prompted 
more stringent building-code requirements, 
particularly when it comes to high winds. 
Increasingly, there has been a call for shin- 
gle manufacturers to make shingles that can 
withstand the harsh elements of these 
storms. Today, most manufacturers warrant 
their shingles to withstand winds of 60 mph 
with a few offering coverage up to 80 mph. 
To find shingles that have higher wind war- 
ranties, you'd be entering rarefied air — un- 



Knowledgeable, Friendly Staff 



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(847) 838-0501 

SUMMER HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 7 am - 5 pm; Closed Sunday 

Directions to Mill ("reek Nursery: 41 North to Rte. 173 (Rosecrans) 
West in (I si Intersection) Mill Creek Rd., Left on gravel road 1/2 mile to Nursery Sign. 




A fiber glass asphalt shingle designed to withstand hurricane-force winds, Cer- 
tainTeed's HatteraE"' comes with 10-year warranty protection against winds of tip 
to 110 mph. 



til now. 

Recently introduced by CertainTeed 
Corporation, HatterasTM is a fiber glass as- 
phalt shingle designed to withstand hurri- 
cane-force winds, with 10-year warranty 
protection against winds of up to 110 mph. 
This wind-warranty coverage is unmatched 
by any roofing shingle on the market today. 
Backed by a 40-year limited warranty 
against manufacturing defects and 10 years 
of coverage against algae growth, Hatteras 
features a unique color-blending process 
and deep 1-inch shadow lines to give it the 
depth and dimensionality of slate. 

This shingle is available in seven colors: 
Lighthouse Red, Windswept Gray (light 
gray), Stormy Night (dark gray), Outer Banks 
(black), Newport Green, Regatta Blue and 
Sandpiper (brown). 

Quality Shingles 
For Any Budget 

In addition to Hatteras, CertainTeed of- 
fers the most comprehensive lineup of fiber 
glass shingles to fit any budget. The Certain- 
Teed Roofing CollectionTM includes Grand 
Manor Shangle® and Carriage House 
ShangleTM, extra- thick Super Shangle® 
products distinguished by their super-deep 
8-lnch tabs and two full-size base shingle 
construction, resulting in multiple layers of 
protection for your roof. 

For shingles that offer depth and dimen- 
sion for more moderate budgets, you might 
want to consider CertainTeed's Indepen- 



dence Shangle®, The LandmarkTM Shingle 
Series or the Horizon Shangle®. These di- 
mensional shingles feature enhancing shad- 
ow lines and a wide range of color offerings 
that cany limited, transferable warranties 
with durations ranging from 25 to 40 years. 
For the budget-conscious who demand* " 
quality, CertainTeed also offers a full tine of 
reliable three-tab shingle products. 

Most important of all, CertainTeed is the 
only U.S. shingle manufacturer whose entire 
lineup of fiber glass shingles (from a 20-year 
warranty duration to a lifetime warranty du- 
ration) Is tested and certified by ULto meet 
the ASTM guidelines for tear, wind and nail- 
pull resistance. So, when you see the UL la- 
bel with the ASTM D3462 classification on 
the side of every bundle of fiberglass shin- 
gles made by CertainTeed, you know you're 
getting proven quality. 

Where can I get more 
Information? 

To learn more, CertainTeed has put to- 
gether "Choosing Quality Roofing Materi- 
als," a fall home-improvement package fea- 
turing the comprehensive guide "Choosing 
a Reputable Roofer," a pocket reference 
brochure showcasing CertainTeed's entire 
line of quality shingle products, and litera- 
ture describing the new Hatteras shingle. To 
order your free kit, call 1-800-782-8777. For a 
list of contractors in your area, visit the 
company's Web site athttp://www.certaln- 
teed.com. 



Is your rosebush troubled? Call the rose doctor 



Roses may not be as carefree as impa- 
tiens, but they really are easy to grow. But 
if you've never seen a particular insect or 
fungus on your roses until now, you may 
feel a little overwhelmed. Or maybe you'd 
just feel more comfortable with a little ex- 
pert help in planting, pruning, or choos- 
ing the right rose for your garden. Why 
not call the rose doctor in your neighbor- 
hood? 

The American Rose Society certifies 
nearly 3,000 Consulting Rosarians nation- 
wide. They are people who have extraor- 
dinary knowledge about roses and rose 
culture, and they'll be happy to help you 



solve your rose problems and answer' 
your rose questions. They even make 
house calls! And this helpful service is ab- 
solutely free. 

The American Rose Society Is a non- 
profit, educational organization, and its 
mission is to help gardeners realize how 
much fun and satisfaction there is in 
growing great roses. If you have a rose 
question, need some rose advice, or just 
want to talk to a rose expert, call the 
American Rose Society at 1-800-637- i 
6534, and ask for the name and the 
number of the Consulting Rosarlan near 
you. 



August 13, 1999 



LAKELIF 



Lakeland Newspapers/JBt 5 ! 



A 



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MEAT Now! 



Today 1 0-6 



90 DAYS SAME AS CASH 

with purchase 

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For 
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Porterhouse Steaks Strip Steaks 

T-Bone Steaks Round Steaks 

Cube Steaks Swiss Steaks 

Rib Steaks Family Steaks 



Swiss Steaks 
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Standing Rib Roast 
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B 1 6 /Lakeland Newspapers 



LAKEL1FE 



August 13, 1999 



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Lakeland 
Newspapers 



Section 



COUNTY DIGEST 



Kidscare passes 

State Rep. Andrea Moore (R-Lib- 
ertyville) said families who qualify for 
the state's "Kidcare" children's health 
insurance program will now find it 
easier to get their children enrolled 
under newleglslation signed into law 
by the govenor. 

Moore, who sponsored the mea- 
sure in the House, said the new law 
makes the registration, process more 
convenient for parents, providing as- 
sistance to help them enroll their 
children in Kidcare at their school or 
a local service provider such as the 
YWCA of Lake County. 

Newton appointed 

Lake County Board member Pam 
Newton (R-Vernon Hills) has been 
reappointed to the National Associa- 
tion of Counties (NACo). Environ- 
ment, Energy and Land Use Streeting 
Committee by NACo President Betty 
Lou Ward. 

"I am honored to be re-appoint- 
ed to this committee that will enable 
Lake County to be on the forefront of 
land-use Issues," Newton said. 

Habitat holds 

Habitatfor Humanity LakeCoun- 
ty will hold two volunteer orientation 
meetings this month. 

One will be held at 10 a.m. on Sat- 
urday, Aug. 14 and the other at 7:30 
p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 17 in the Habi- 
tat for Humanity office at 315 North 
Utica in Waukegan. The meetings, 
which take place on the second Satur- 
day and third Tuesday of each month, 
provide an opportunity to learn about 
habitat and its volunteer needs. 




11 






WEEK 



UNIVERSAL 
QUESTION 

Does Heaven have earthly 
comforts? 

PLEASE SEE PAGE C5 

NORTH OF THE 
BORDER 

See the Kenosha County Fair 
special section 

INSIDE, SECTION F 








ByJOHNROSZKOWSKl 
Regional Editor 



block. If the new fiscal year begins on 
Oct 1 as projected, we shall experi- 
ence doomsay for veteramThe mas- 
sive cuts that will take place are un- 
conscionable." 

The County Board referred the 

matter to the Legislative Committee, 

which plans to draft a 



Some local" veterans are con- 
cerned about the potential for dras- 
tic reductions in health care services, 
including the possibility of the future 
closing of the VA 

Hospital in North 'That is correct— resolution opposing 

Chicago. the facility is on tlie any further cuts in 

dJmiK£i choppingblrtc.Iftlteneu, rel ™ ^„t 
some other veterans fiscalyear begins on Oct 1 t0 see VAservices cut 
made a brief presen- as projected, we shall for veterans," said 
lske experience doomsay for Legislative Commit- 

for* rhalrrnfln Ittsii 



County Board this 
week of their con- 
cerns. 

Mazur said there 
have been substan- 
tial cuts in health 
care services for veterans In recent 
years, and he fears worse are yet to 
come unless something isn't done, 

"Now we are faced with the clo- 
sure of the North Chicago VA. Hospi- 
tal," Mazur said in an Aug. 1 letter to 
County Board members. "That is cor- 
rect— the facility is on the chopping 



veterans," 

PhilMazur 
veteran from IJbenyville 



tee Chairman Judy 
Martini (R-Antioch). 
"they shouldn't be 
subjected to inferior 
health care because 
they've dedicated 
their lives to protecting our country 
and our rights." 

County Board member Peggy 
Shorts (D-Waukegan) said there have 
been discussion that the federal bud- 
get ax could significantly impact ser- 




By JOHN ROSZKOWSK1 
Regional Editor 

A proposed federal law which 
claims to protect religious freedom 
would actually interferi/' 
with local government of- 
ficials ability to enforce 
the law/according to some 
Lake County officials. 

The Lake County 
Board was scheduled to 
vote this week on a resolu- 
tion opposing U.S. House 
Resolution, 1691, also 
known as the Religious 
Liberty Protection Act of 
1999. However/Chairman 
Jim LaBelle postponed a 
vote to give county offi- 
cials more time to study the issue. 

The bill overwhelmingly passed 
the U.S. House and was introduced 
, in the Senate by U.S. Sen. Orrin 
Hatch (R-Utah). But many Republi- 
cans and Democrats on the County 
Board are opposed to the legislation. 
"It's pure poppycock," explained 




Marks: 

Disagrees with 
'religious' law 



board member Martha Marks (R- 



Riverwoods). "It doesn't have any- 
thing to do with religious freedom 
and it Has everything to do with peo- 
ple who want to get around the law. 
And I'm embarrassed it came from a 
Republican senator." 

The board s resolution 
stated that Lake County 
strongly opposes the "Re- 
ligious Liberty Protection 
Act" and urges senators 
from Illinois to vote 
against the bill if it reach- 
es the Senate floor. 
The resolution adds that 
the proposed act would 
prohibit the application 
of local laws against reli- 
gious Institutions and ac- 
tivities if those laws cre- 
ate a "substantial burden," That bur- 
den could only be overcome if coun- 
ty government could prove the laws 
are furthering a "compelling govern- 
ment Interest" 

If the law passes, Marks said any 
individual could form a church and 

Please see BILL IC2 




. By JOHN RpSZKOWSKI 

Regional Editor 

A new millennium is.approach- 
•■ trig -ahd^ Lake Co u n ty ; official s are 
planning to bring it in with a bang. 

Lake County has' formed a Mil- 
lennium Committee^ which is in the 
process of organiz- 



Kyle said there will be a series of 
celebrations scattered throughout 
various geographic locations of the 
county. Some of,the planned events^ 
for theyear iricltide a take&oriicele'r 
b ration In Waukegan; a Venetian 
Night where lighted. sailboats will 
hook up from Winthrop Harbor to 
Highland Park; and 



will 'also be national entertainment - tennium activities. So 



u<: 



perfbrming.- 

Lake County Is providing $85,000 

in planning money for the millenni- 
um activities .and seeks donations 
'from businesses to help with tfcwTnil-' 




has donated $15,000 to the cause. 

"We're pretty sure other corpora- 
tions will want to step up to the plate 

Ptedsesee CELEBRATION /C2 



tag a wide range of 'This is the most significant a Taste ? of Lake 
activities to cele- chronological event of our County in Liber 

lifetimetoseetheturnofa Special event is 

new century, as weU as the 
new millennium' 



brate the year 2000. 
Angelo Kyle, 
the County Board 
member who 
chairs the Millenni- 
um Commission, 
said while there 
will be a wide range 



also being planned 
in conjunction with 
the Lake County 
Fair in Grayslake, as 
well as other events 
inAntioch.Ravinia 



Angela Kyle 
County Board member 

of entertainment and events planned and at other locations, according to 

for the millennium, it's more than just Kyle. 

a year-long party. Kyle pointed out the millennium 
"Basically, we're trying to pro- activities are still in the planning 
mote a sense of unity throughout stages and no dates, schedules or de- 
Lake County," said Kyle. "It's, also a tails have been set. 
major marketing event for what kind However, he said the plan is to 
of services Lake County government have at least one major event per 
provides and how Lake County citi- month during the year 2000 to cele- 
zens can access those services." brate the millennium. Kyle said there 



Power plant meeting held 



ByJOHNROSZKOWSKl 
Regional Editor 



Lake County residents con- 
cerned about the possibility of anat- 
ural gas fired power plant locating in 
their communities will have the op- 
portunity give their views at a public 
meeting. 

The Lake County Board's Public 
Works andTransportation will host a 
meeting on the issue of power plants 
from 7 to 9 p.m. Aug. 18 in the Wau- 
conda Township Hall. The public is 
invited to attend the meeting. 

The county has invited officials 
from the Illinois Environmental Pro- 



tection Agency and Illinois State Wa- 
ter Survey to speak at the meeting 
and answer audience questions. 
Representatives from the county 
health department, Public Works De- 
partment and Stormwater Manage- 
ment Commission are also expected 
'to be on hand. . 

Earlier this spring, the Village of 
Island Lake Board went on record as 
"being against any natural gas fueled 
power plants in or near the village" 
after a plant attempted to locate in 
the village. Another company's pro- 
posal to locate a facility in libertyville 
has also generated much public con- 
cern. 




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02/ Lakeland Newspapers 



COUNTY 



August 13, 1999 



01 



Higher learning 

This Is the view looking south- 
east at the planned student _„ 
drop-offifor the/MuffilJbwIrsfW n 
Center at University fXVtttif4herl? 
redevelopment of thfl Lakehurst / 
Mall In Waukegari. A* new ur- 
bantsm community will be built 
around accessible higher edu- 
cation, cultural amenities and 
transit. The entrance at the 
northwest comer of the existing 
Ward's space In the mall shows 
a domed theatre and clock tow- 
er in the background. Develop- 
er is Martin Tuohy and Associ- 
ates, Ubertyville. Architect Is 
Lucien LaGrange and Associ- 
ates, Chicago. Developers are 
waiting for a decision on the lo- 
cation for the proposed univer- 
sity center. 



N 




Now accepting registration for FALL! 

(limited spaces available) 



AMS3S 




Full day child care for 2-5 year olds. 

Monday through Friday 

6:30 am - 6 pm 

706 E. Hawley, Mundelein 

(847)949-0060 

part of the Lake County Family YMCA 

YCHILD CARE 

We build strong kids, strong famines, strong communities. 



Lindenfest, Inc. is pleased to present 




A fun-filled event for the entire family! 




Utile Miss. ^ 

Junior Miss, f*3 

&Mlss 
Lindenhurst 

£p Pageants ,-. . 

t^ 'Magic Dave* *gj 

'Band.com' 

"Kevin Purcell 

*^Nightburners'ijS' 



MUSIC! 
BINGO! 
GAMES! 
MAGIC SHOW! 
FOOD& 
DRINK! 
CARNIVAL 
RIDES! 



JSr Mayor's 1?* 

0p Auction * **£ 

Karaoke 

'World Class 

^^ Noise" ^^ 

GO 'Blind Man's *£?* 

Biuir 

'Kail Sue 
Palmer* ^. 



V 



FREE ADMISSION! 



&M 



Hit the Parade! *£ 

Saturday, August 14, 10:00 a.m. 
The parade begins at Lake Shore 

Drive and Spring Hill Lane. It will 

travel to Wilcliwood Lane, to 

laurel Drive, onto Beck, before 

heading down Sand Lake Road, 

ending at Valley Drive. 



tiSB&ft 





*«twtt**ra*M 



Mayor's 
Auction! 

Saturday, 2:00 p.m. 

Follow the parade to the 

Feillval Grounds for the 

parade awards end the 

Mayor's Auction) 



LINDENHURST VILLAGE HALL GROUNDS 
Rt. 132 & Sand Lake Rd., 2 miles W. of Rt. 45 



FROM PAGE CI 



HOSPITAL: VA on the line 



vices at veterans hospitals. 

"We hope it's not a totally done 
deal/' she said. 

She said she has heard initial 
plans are to reduce the number of 
hospital beds at the North Chicago 
VA facility. Eventually, she fears the 
VA may move to close the North 
Chicago hospital. 

"It's a sad situation they would 
even think about total closure of the 



hospital, but I'm afraid that's what 
they're proposing," she said. 

Shorts said county officials are in 
close contact with state and federal 
legislators to indicate their concern 
about the impact of future cuts in 
veterans services. 

She said they plan to raise the is- 
sue during the National Association 
of County Officials meeting in Wash- 
ington, D.C., in September. 



BILL: Religious law questioned 



then claim to be exempt from local 
zoning, health and environmental 
regulations because it Is "a religious 
institution," 

The Issue was brought to the' 
board's attention by board mem- 
ber Pam Newton (R-Vernon Hills), 
who asked the County Administra- 
tor's Office to draft the resolution 
opposing the bill. Newton said she 
first learned of the issue during a 
meeting of the National Associa- 
tion of County officials in St. Louis 
in July. 

Newton, who works for a church 
in Vernon Hills, said the board cer- 
tainly supports the free exercise of re- 
ligion and appreciates the "corner- 
stone" legitimate churches provide 
in their communities. 



However, she said the board Is said. 



concerned the proposed legislation 
will protect people who will use their 
religious status to skirt local laws and 
regulations such as building setback 
requirements, wetlands and flood 
control regulations, arid even child 
abuse laws. 

"This is for the person or persons 
who form their own church for the 
sole purpose of avoiding health, safe- 
ty and welfare laws," she said. 

Newton said the board resolu- 
tion simply asks the Senate to im- 
pose the same requirements on 
these churches to follow local laws 
and regulations as other individuals 
or groups. 

"We're just trying to prevent a 
hate group from incorporating into a 
church and abusing local laws," she 



CELEBRATION: Year 2000 



and donate to this event," Kyle said. 

The county has also sent letters to 
52 municipalities throughout the 
county, asking for their support and 
involvement in the millennium plan- 
ning process. It is also seeking cooper- 
ation from the schools to organize stu- 
dent competitions on what the mil- 
lennium means to them, Kyle said. 

Susan Link, who has been hired 
as the Lake County Millennium 
Commission coordinator, said about 



80 people have been actively in- 
volved in the millennium planning 
process, including business people, 
local and schools officials, clergy and 
ordinary citizens. 

"People are very excited about 
this and everybody wants to partici- 
pate somehow," Link said. "We want 
to be as inclusive as we can.** 

"We expect the enthusiasm will 
continue to snowball the closer we 
get," she added. 




Large display of designer styles 

Men 's and Women 9 s Wigs, 

Hairpieces & Toupees 

Personalized Service 
Private Fitting Rooms 




"The Finest Selection of Designer Wigs'* 

2205 Grand Ave., Waukegan IL ^j^flerihg 7 

10% Off the 
i ;„ . ■■■■ -Wig of Your 



€ 









< 



■'. ..■ _ ..J 






I 



August 13, 1999 




AT A GLANCE 



A DIGEST OF STORIES MAKING HEADLINES THROUGHOUT OUR REGION 






■ 



■ 







Board approves hotel/motel tax 

Mundelein— Staying at a hotel or motel In Mundelein 
just got more expensive. 

The village board voted unanimously Monday night to 
adopt the hotel/motel tax ordinance, which will give the vil- 
lage five percent of the rent charged for each room rented at a 
hotel or mo tel in the village. 

The village board originally psoted the ordinance at the 
Aug. 2 meeting. While no comments were made by the public 
during the Monday night meeting, the decision to post the or- 
dinance was not met without opposition. Robert Goss, gener- 
al manager of the Ram'ada Inn, commented during the Aug. 2 
meeting thathe felt trieboard should not adopt the ordi- 
nance. 

"We feel this tax is unfair to the hotels and motels in 
Mundelein," said Goss. 

Goss is concerned over who will pay for the tax. He said 
the Ramada Inn could pay for the tax, or rates could be In- 
creased for customers. 

Mayor Marilyn Slndies said village officials did a 
"tremendous amount of research and found out we are one of 
a few communities that do not have a...hotel and motel tax." 

She said Llbertyvilie and Vernon Hills are both consider- 
ing the tax at this time. 

Rink Side Sports to open in Gurnee 

Gurnee — Gurnee Mills wlU soon be home to the area's 
only ice arena within a mall. 

On Aug. 19, Rink Side Sports, located between JC Penney 
and TIMaxx, will celebrate its grand opening. Wild Wing 
Duck, the official mascot of the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, 
Calif., as well as a Chicago Blackhawk legend, will be on-hand 
for the festivities. 

Rink Side Sports will offer figure skating and hockey 
lessons on an NHL-size ice arena. The Learn to Skate pro- 
grams, for beginners through adult, will allow people to learn 
free style, ice dancing and precision team skating. Hockey 
lessons will be for ages 2 through adult, and hockey leagues 
will be available. 

In addition to ice skating, additional activities will be of- 
fered, including a "Crayon Room," "Soft-Play Area," and an 
arcade area boasting 'more than 180 virtual reality and video 
game. 

Rink Side Sports will be open from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m. 
seven days a week, 365 days a year. 

The fun will begin at 11 a.m. on Aug. 19, when Rink Side 
"Sports' will hold its grand opening. Throughout that weekend, 
Radio Disney AM 1300 will be ort-hand with Disney charac- 
ters including Snow White, Dopey, and Flick and Atta from "A 
Bug's life." 

Village adopts sales tax ordinance 

Mundelein— The Mundelein Village Board voted unan- 
imously Monday night to approve a .75 percent retailers' oc- 
cupation tax. . • • . 

Trustees Kenneth Kessler and Steve Powell were absent 
from the meeting. Kessler, however, relayed a message to the 
board thathe is in support of the ordinance. 

No members of the audience spoke out against the tax at 

the meeting 

According to the ordinance, which was created using the 
village's Home Rule authority, retailers in the village must file 
a report to the State Department of Revenue by the end of 
each month. The tax will then be paid to the State Depart- 
ment of Revenue. 

"The Department of Revenue shall have full power to ad- 
minister and enforce the provisions of this section, including 
all civil penalties assessed as an incident to the tax imposed," 
states the ordinance, ,, 

The tax will not apply to the sales of food for human con- 
sumption which will be consumed off the premises where it is 
sold. It will also not apply to prescription and nonprescription 
medicines, medical appliances and items used by diabetics. 

Kindermusik classes to begin 

Round Lake-^Kindermusik classes will be starting up 
soon in Round Lake. The program nurtures the total develop- 
ment of newborns and children up to 4-years-old. Instruction 
Includes listening, vocal development, ensemble work, play- 
ing Instruments and musical games. 

A 16-week program begins the week of September 13. 
The Kindermusik "Village" program for lap babies, crawlers, 




.•■:■}.;. ■ - ' ■ . • ~ TT - ~~ ™ ■• 



Pick up any of 



BuiikJerii'react to tj^neiy water 
shedTe^ctibnsJ 

^'County:' v^/: : 




11-year-old Elizabeth Gottlieb of , Buffalo Grove cre- 
ates a painting In the children's artwork area of the 
David Adler Festival of Arts in Ubertyvllle's Central 
Park Saturday afternoon.— -Pnoco by Sandy Bressner 



and walkers ages newborn to 18 months. This program will be 
offered on Tuesdays from 9:30-10:15 a.m., and Wednesdays 
from ll:15-noon at the Round Lake Community Church. i* 

Kindermusik "Our Time" Is for children ages 18 months to 
3 and a half-years-old. This program will be offered Tuesdays 
from 1030-11:15 am. and HSO-noori, and on Wednesdays 
from 9:30-10:15 a.m. and 1030-11 a.m. at the Round Lake 
Community Church. 

A Wednesday evening "pajama class" will be offered from 
7-7:45 p.m. at 534 W. WUdspring in Bright Meadows Subdivi- 
sion, Round Lake. ( 

Classes will be filled on a first come first serve basts. For 
more information, contact director Wendolyn Davis at 546- 
2093. 

Young riders preparing to compete 

Old Mill Creek— Young equestrians from across the 
U.S.., Canada, Mexico, Central America, Puerto Rico, and the 
Caribbean Islands will converge on Tempel Farms in Old Mill 
Creek August 10-15 for the 1999 North American Young Riders 
Championships. 

The young competitors will vie for medals in the three 
Olympic equestrian disciplines of show jumping, dressage and 

eventing. 

Tempel Farms is located at 17000 Wadsworth Road in Old 

Mill Creek. ;■ •• * J1C 

One-day tickets for the events of August 13, 14, and 15 are 
priced at $5. Unlimited admission for all three days is $12. Tick- 
ets can be purchased at the door. 

For additional information, call (847) 295-32B5. 

Hair salon damaged by fire 

Undenfnirst— Shoman Hair Studio at 2450 Grass Lake 



Road In Lindenhuist suffered fire damage on Friday, August 
6, after an electrical mechanism under a vibrating chair 
sparked and ignited a wicker basket holding magazines, 

The salon did not have a fire alarm, but did have a bur- 
glar alarm that was activated after heat and flames from the 
fire melted the phone line. 

Lindenhuist police were assisted by the Lake Villa Fire 
Department At first, they could see no signs of smoke or fire 
from the outside of the building, but discovered heavy black 
smoke after entering through a front glass door. 

Five firefighters extinguished the fire that originated In a 
small room located in the far rear portion of the salon. Fire 
damage was contained to that area, but heavy smoke and 
heat destroyed the remaining portion of the interior. 

The salon has been in business for five years. Officials arc 
calling the fire accidental. 

Leaf burning meeting series continue! 

Fox Lake— Merely mention the words leaf burning and it 
is easy to bring out a wide variety of opinions. 

For some, it Is nostalgic nights at the campflre, roasting 
marshmallows and telling stories. 

For others, health risks abound each fall when the season 
Is at Its peak. Thousands of dollars are spent by some on 
home improvements and itls necessary for some asthma suf 
fers to stay Indoors. - 

A large crowd gathered at Grant High School's commons 
to voice both views, with most opposed to the leaf burning 
ban. Lake County Board members at the meeting stated no 
* decision has been reached, and it could be next year before a 
Information is gathered and facts weighed 

Colin Thacker, director of environmental health for Lake 
County health department, cited statistics on hospital visits. 
There were 8,200 hospital visits at Provena St Therese in 199: 
relating to asthma. The young and the elderly are particularly 
at risk, audience m embers were told. 

Twenty-two communities have bans on burning, with 14 
on restricted status. "Fifty percent of thecounty bans orre- 
stricts leaf burning," Thacker said. 

Audience members said proposals from the county to dab 
are too expensive. Most opposed a leaf burning ban. 

Plane crash takes lives 

^.-LhMJ Milium! The Uvea of two Undenhurst tealdcnte, 
one Grayalake resident, and one McHenry resident were tak- 
en due to Injuries from a private airplane accident on Thurs- 
day, Aug. 5. The plane crashed southwest of Campbell Airpor 
in Fremont Township.The cause of the accident is still un- 
known. 

According to the take County Coroner's preliminary ex- 
amination, alJ victims bad massive external and Interna] in- 
" juries. 

Pamela J. Wright (nee Robinson), 27, of Lindenhursf, 
passed away along wl th her husband Barry Wright and her fa- 
ther John Robinson, of Grayslake. 

Search continues for resident 

Lake VUIa— Despite further diving attempts and surface 
searches amidst the weedy waters of Deep Lake, the body of 
Jeremy Ultch, 22, of Antioch, has still not been found 

According to Lieutenant Roger Schroeder of the Lake Villa 
Police Department, a team of dogs from a special organiza- 
tion called Illinois- Wisconsin Search and Rescue were sent 
out on Friday, August 6 to pinpoint spots where a corpse 
could potentially be. 

After the dogs indicated the places where a body could 
possibly be, divers went down to look once again. However, 
nothing had been found as of August 10. 

Based on his conversations with divers from the Lake Villa 
Fire Department, Schroeder said they have been diving "at 
least 60 feet deep, with varying water temperatures from 50 
degrees to 80-plus degrees." Schroeder also said they are tar- 
geting areas probably around 100 yards from the shoreline. 

"The weeds are just tremendous— extremely thick, and 
they are layered," Schroeder said. "It is very hazardous for our 
divers to go in the water." 

As of August 9, the divers have tentatively ceased 
their underwater recovery efforts for Ultch's body. 
Schroeder said that every morning, the police depart- 
ment is still checking the shoreline to see if anything has 
surfaced though. 




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SENIOR JUDGE 

High school seniors rnaysoon have the 

'chari&;iio:be : .d 

. — County ■■-■■■■' 



s for: 



TEE TIME! 



Stonewall Orchard 



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x -'- **4tYH£U't.r 



Gotf Course i opens in 

Lake County. 

— Ukeihi 






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C4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



OPINIONS 



August 13, 1999 



Lakeland Newspapers 



William H. Schroeder 

Publisher 



Neal Tucker 

Executive Editor/ 
Operations Manager 



Robert Warde 

Now* Editor 



30 South Whitney St., Graysl ake, Illinois 60030 
Tel: (847) 223-8161. E-mail: edll@lnd.com 



EDITORIALS 



Breather slows 
surge of housing 

Anew definition of community progress has been 
written by the mayor of a western suburb. The defin- 
ition is embodied in the conviction that a communi- 
ty is progressing when it maintains a healthy balance 
between commercial, residential and industrial develop- 
ment. 

Author of the definition is Mayor Sue Klinkhamer of St. 
Charles who has drawn the line on new residential develop- 
ment. While Klinkhamer may come off as somewhat of a 
pariah, she is convinced a breathing spell on home building 
is in order. St. Charles has enough people right now, in the 
mayor's opinion. 

St. Charles, in the same population category as such Lake 
County communities as Mundelein, Lake Zurich, Gurnee 
and Round Lake Beach, isn't exactly standing still. Currently 
in various stages of construction are 2,888 units spread 
through single-family dwellings, town homes and apart- 
ments. Also under construction are 186 assisted-living units. 

In saying, "No thanks, not now" to three proposed resi- 
dential developments, Mayor Klinkhamer said St. Charles of- 
ficials have been sending the wrong message by being 
friendly and cooperative to residential developers. In effect, 
commercial developers became disenchanted with the result 
St. Charles was targeted for an abundance of high density 
residential projects. 

When is the last time a Lake County community, particu- 
larly those with a shortage of classrooms, high tax rates and 
strained municipal services, drew a line on building? We're 
hard pressed to recall. 

Klinkhamer struck a sensitive chord here and elsewhere 
in Lake County when she asserted that too much residential 
development can suck the life out of the local tax base. 
Homeowners may get the drift of what the mayor is talking 
about when they pay their second installment on real estate 
taxes in a few weeks. 

So, if progress is a three-legged stool, Mayor Klinkhamer 
figures St. Charles is sitting pretty. 

Great America 
ticket increase 

How in the world can a representative of Great 
America Theme Park have the nerve to admit that 
an increase in attendance due to new rides such as 
the Raging Bull is one of the reasons behind a in- 
crease in their park admission and parking fees, midway into 
the season. 

Sound like price gouging? 

What if the Brewers, Cubs, or Sox were suddenly in first 
place or in the pennant chase? Would they be justified in 
raising their ticket prices because of the increase in atten- 
dance at the parks? 

Same with a movie theater. An unexpected blockbuster 
film comes along, so Regal and Cineplex Odeon jump up 
their ticket prices a couple of bucks. 

Think twice about where you decide to spend your enter- 
tainment dollars. Maybe with the local high school sports 
and performing arts seasons coming up, or places like 
Wilmot Speedway and P.M.&L. Theaters keeping their prices 
the same all season long, with free parking available, you 
may want to think twice about where to go for fun. 



For highlights of Illinois 

and services contact the 

State of Illinois new 

home page website address: 

www.state.il.us 



VIEWPOINT 



Cell tower pall hits coun 




Americans love their cell 
phones and hate the cellu- 
lar telephone towers that 
are sprouting like dande- 
lions on a spring day. 

Has one of those 80 to 100 foot 
metal cylinders ever gone up with- 
out howls of anguish and neighbor- 
hood nattering? Not In Lake County. 

Grousing about cell towers Is 
second only to waits about gridlock 
and horror stories connected with 
afternoon drive time. Ever no., je 
how little complaining there is 
about the morning commute? You're 
late to work. Tough. That's the boss' 
problem. But back to cell towers. 
Hate'm. In the last 18 months, 
the view from my living room has 
been desecrated by two subdivision 
water storage tanks and a cell tower. 
Hopefully, a rising tree line will 
eventually cover the tanks, but the 
tower might be hovering over the 
neighborhood forever. 

Welcome to the club, neighbors. 
We're all in the loathing of cell tow- 
ers together. Two politicians, State 
Sen. Terry Link (D-Vemon Hills) and 
State Rep. Susan Garrett (D-Lake 
Forest) are doing their best to make 
political hay out of the avalanche of 
cell towers. 

True to her liberal heritage, Gar- 
rett sees everyone as a victim. The 
siting process is "unfair," Garrett ex- 
claims. Link wants to flush the tower 
builders into the open, remove the 
stealth factor from tower construc- 
tion. 

Link's approach amounts to 
building an early warning system. 
There is a great deal or secrecy in the 
tower business. Operators cut a deal 
with a friendly landlord. (We've 
heard site leases running from $800 
to 51,200 per month). A concrete 
pad is poured. A few days later a 
crane arrives and the tower ascends 
skyward in all its bristling, ugly glory 
to make our cell calls move faster 
and clearer. 

Homeowners living in the shad- 
ow of a cell tower make their an- 
guish known to politicians. About 
complaints, State Sen. William "Bill" 




BILL SCHROEDER 

Publisher 



Peterson (R-Long Grove) said, "I get 
them all the time." State Rep, Tim 
Osmond (R-Antioch) said his office 
gets plenty of anti-tower 
comments. 

The cell tower builders are like 
bullies. Facing heavy opposition, 
they just pick on someone else, As 
long as people love their cell 
phones, the towers aren't going 
away. 

Founders remembered 

Nice gesture on the part of 
College of Lake County trustees to 
honor CLC's seven founding 
trustees, four of whom are de- 
ceased. The recognition kicked off 
the college's 30th anniversary ob- 
servance, that while not as far- 
reaching as the 25th will still be 
significant. Highlight of the "30th" 
will be an open house "A Taste of 
Learning" at the Grayslake cam- 
pus Sept. 25. Sounds like there will 
be food. 

Deceased founders include Oby 
Cowan of North Chicago, Dr. 
Lawrence Day of Libertyville, 
Charles E. Neal of North Chicago 
and Herbert Wesner of Lake Zurich. 
Taking part in the 30th anniversay 
events will be Ted Paxton of Zion, 
Thelma Sandee of Waukegan and 
Atty. Jim Lumber of Round Lake, 
who still is a member of the CLC 
board. 

The "Taste" day, by the way, will 
coincide with the actual opening 
date of classes in 1969. 



Hike happy 

With three price hikes already 
instituted this season at Six Flags 
Great America, can a fourth be far 
behind? Great America definitely is 
setting new bars for the cost of fami- 
ly entertainment with adult admis- 
sion now at $39 and children at 
$19.50. "We're having a very good 
year," one Great America official 
commented. Why not make it even 
better?The Village of Gurnee gets a 
piece of the action to the tune of 
more than $1 million per year. 

Fashion statement 

In the fashion conscious world of 
teenagers, students at North Chicago 
High will be making a fashion state- 
ment of their own when the fall term 
opens — uniforms. Two years ago 
Dist. 187 opted for uniforms for all K- 
8 students. Supt Patricia Pickles says 
clothing rules are raising standards of 
appearance and behavior. 

Among them are improved 
morale and pride, reduction of gang 
problems and violence, increased 
focus on academics and a more seri- 
ous attitude, particularly about 
preparing for a career or college. 

Basic to the uniform are solid 
navy or dark blue bottom gar- 
ments with white tops. K-5 stu- 
dents can vary tops with light blue. 
Middle schoolers can vary with red 
tops. 

Approved variations include 
shorts (culottes for girts), solid color 
sweaters or vests, and navy blue, 
block or white stockings. Mini-skirts 
for girls and baggie bottoms for boys 
are out. Middle school and high 
school students won't be allowed to 
wear gym shoes outside of gym 
class. 

One man's family 

Budding artist Erlka has been 
perfecting her talent in art class this 
summer. She's graduated from re- 
frigerator art. One of her grandpar- 
ents' prized possessions is a framed 
oil painting of a wolf presented as a 
Christmas present. 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Dear 'mom and dad' (whoever you are) 



On Thursday, July 22, 1 went 
to the 4:15 p.m. showing 
of "The General's Daugh- 
ter" at Regal Cinemas in 
Round Lake Beach. You had obvi- 
ously planned to spend some "quali- 
ty" family time together that day be- 
cause you brought your little girl, 
who appeared to 3 or 4 years old, 
along with you. 

You put the little girl between 
the two of you and were seated right 
behind me, I clearly heard all the 
questions she asked concerning the 
masochism, the sexual devices dis- 
played, the aftermath of a suicide, 
full nudity, and the extremely graph- 
ic scene containing the bondage, 
torture, and gang rape. Add the vul- 
gar and obscene language and you 
have what I'm sure your little tot 
thought was just a delightful after- 
noon. Your thoughtless act exposed 
that little girl to things she should 
never have seen or heard. How long 
will those images be going through 
her mind? What is wrong with the 
two of you? Do you consider your- 
selves responsible parents? Respon- 
sible for what? Shame on you for 
what you did to that child. You both 
disgust me. 

Terri Matthies 
Round Lake Beach 



Certain uncertainty 

The only certainty about politics 
Is its uncertainty. The Republicans 



represent the "out party." Yet, it 
seems that Texas Gov. George W. 
Bush Jr., will be the GOP candidate. 

Ironically, the "in party" (the one 
controlling the White House), may 
have a competitive race between 
"Dull Al" and "Boring BUI" for the 
Democratic presidential nomina- 
tion. Bradley represents a serious 
challenger against Gore for these 
reasons: 

(1) Bradley has a "celebrity sta- 
tus" as a former New York "Knicks" 
player, he has been endorsed by for- 
mer Bulls Coach Phil Jackson. (Phil 
played on the "Knicks" with his bud- 
dy, "Dollar Bill.") Michael Jordan and 



his wife have made campaign con- 
tributions to the Bradley candidacy. 
Most voters like "celebrities." 

(2) Bradley has raised over $11 
million to wage an aggressive cam- 
paign against Gore for the Democra- 
tic presidential nomination. 

(3) Bill Bradley is the only per- 
son to oppose Gore for the presiden- 
tial nomination. Thus, the anti-Gore 
voters have only one option: Vote for 
the ex-New Jersey senator. 

(4) Gore is linked to Bill Clinton. 
Following "SUck Willie's" impeach- 
ment, the vice-president character- 

Pleasesee LETTERS /C5 



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August 23, 1999 



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OPINIONS 




PARTY LINES 

PARTY LINES, THE LAKELAND NEWSPAPERS' COLUMN OF POLITICAL OPINION 

IS PREPARED FROM STAFF REPORTS. 

Stolman jockeying for Route 55 role? 



A call for a public referen- 
dum on Route 53 by Coun- 
ty Board Rep. David Stol- 
man (R- Buffalo Grove) has 
raised the question whether the out- 
spoken attorney Is jockeying for the 
posf tlon of political point man for 
the controversial highway. 

There has been a vacuum in 
Route 53 political leadership in Lake 
County since Bob Churchill 
stepped down as a state representa- 
tive. Churchill handled the heavy 
lifting on Route 53 In Lake County 
for the Republican high command. 

State Rep. Sidney Matthias 
(R-Buffalo Grove) has shied away 
from the Route 53 "point" role even 
though the proposed toll way is seen 
as relieving congestion in booming 
Vernon Township. 

At present, Matthias b occupied 
with promoting his first county-wide 
fundraiser, a pizza bonanza Wednes- 
day Sept. 29, at Lou Malnati's Pizze- 
ria, 85 S. Buffalo Grove Rd„ Buffalo 
Grove. With all the pizza pie you can 
eat as an attraction, the $25 admis- 
sion charge looks like a steal. 

Porter challenge 

The specter of Chicago-style 
campaigning looms over the an- 
nouncement that Democrat Chris 
Cohen, 57, of Glencoe is organizing 
to challenge Congressman John 
Porter in the 2000 general election. 
Cohen Is a former Chicago alder- 
man. Democrats and liberals in the 
10th District, still stinging from 
Porter's Clinton Impeachment vote, 
are urging Cohen to run. 

Need teacher help 

Grant township Assessor Betty 
Nleml offered a suggestion how 
schools can enact better impact fee 
agreements with developers. "Get 
help from the teachers. They've got 
one of the strongest lobbies in 
Springfield," Niemi pointed out. Yes, 
second to the real estate lobby, re- 
garded the strangest In the state 
capitol, a major foe of Impact fees. 




iJg •••■■ / 



Stolman: Possible 
point man for public 
controversy 



Source off money 

State Sen. BUI Peterson (R- 

Long Grove) was tactful in correct- 
ing Grant Township Supervisor Gor- 
don Klesgen who excitedly ex- 
claimed at a groundbreaking cere- 
mony that two state grants of 
$200,000 each for a new township 
recreation complex were "gifts from 
God." "Really, the grants were made 
possible by the taxpayers of Illinois," 
Peterson explained. 

Link opponent 

Democratic tacticians are 
mulling over the possibility of a 
challenge to State Sen. Terry Link 
(D-Vernon Hills) from Republican 
Sue Gravenhorst of Lake Bluff, a 
long-time member of the University 
of Illinois board of trustees. Graven- 
horst ran statewide when U of I 
trusteeships were filled by election 
so she Is a seasoned campaigner. 
Link expects his opponent in No- . 
vember 2000 will be a woman. 

Plate promoter 

Illinois Sec of State Jesse 
White was personally distributing 
ballots for the new license plate de- 
sign during a swing through Lake 
County last week. White cheerfully 
ignored the $49 million cost of re- 
plating Illinois autos. 



Batter-Up 

The lindenhurst Village 
Board has accepted the challenge 
and is manipulating the rules for the 
upcoming 1st Annual Public Service 
Invitational Softball Challenge Satur- 
day, August 21 at Lake Villa Township 
Baseball Complex on Grass Lake 
Road. Trustee Jim "dont call me 
Rlggteman" Betustak, village 
team manager, announced "we're 
going to kick their butts" regarding 
the village's first round opponent, 
the Village of Lake Villa. The po- 
lice departments of Lindenhurst 
and Lake Villa take on each other In 
a first round game. Lake Villa Fire 
District takes on the Rescue 
Squad. "After we do away with 
those bums from Lake Villa, and our 
police department beats Lake Villa's, 
then we'll take care of our police de- 
partment and head for the champi- 
onship round," stated Betustak, not- 
ing the Lindenhurst Cubs will shine 
in '99. "We are bringing the village 
together to work as a common 
cause," Betustak said. "We had 15 
show up for practice including the 
mayor, village attorney, public works 
department, water and sewer de- 
partment and the village board. We 
encourage the public to come out 
and support us." Police Chief Jack 
McKeever declined rebuttle time, 
quietly taking in Manager Betustaks 
comments. Seems there's been 
some new hires in the police depart- 
ment who have some athletic ability. 
Speaking of that, Betustak has man- 
aged to read into the rules that 
spouses of employees of the village 
are also eligible to play. Tom Gre- 
gorln, former standout at North 
Chicago High School and with the ' 
North Chicago Red Sox of the Shore- 
line League, husband of Clerk. Mar- 
ilyn Gregorln, has been recruited 
and signed as a "free agent" Plan 
now to attend a fun day of so ft ball 
with proceeds to help the Lake Villa 
Township Baseball League. Games 
begin at 10 a.m. 



iatest news fro 

and he 





My recent column about 
heaven kindled com- 
ment from friends. I 
mentioned that Pope 
John Paul has proclaimed heaven is 
not a physical place, which suggests 
we won't be taking along our favorite 
earthly toys. 

That disturbs me. Think about 
it, can Sammy Sosa feel fulfilled and 
rewarded In heaven without a base- 
ball bat? Brett Favre without a foot- 
ball? Gretzky without his skates? 
Elvis without his guitar? Bill Clinton 
without ... oh, never mind, He prob- 
ably won't be there anyway. 

My favorite earthly pleasures In- 
clude golf courses. My son-in-law 
Mike assures me there will be golf 
courses in heaven. He tells about 
two golfers who promised that the 
one who died first would somehow 
get back and report to the other. 

And, lo and behold, the one who 
died first did appear to his friend. 

"I have good news and bad 
news," he announced. "The good 
news is, yes, there is a heaven and 
we have goIJf courses up here. The 
bad news is, you have a 9 o'clock 
tee-off time tomorrow morning," 

The subjects of heaven and hell 
were dealt with tongue-in-cheek in 
the book, "Growing Up Catholic," by 
Mary Jane Frances Cavolina Meara, 
Jeffrey Allen Joseph Stone, Maureen 
Anne Teresa Kelly and Richard Glen 
Michael Davis. (Catholics collect a 
lot of names while growing up.) 

"What hell is all about is pain, 
both physical and spiritual," they 
wrote. "The pain, at least envisioned 
by one catechism teacher, Is equiva- 
lent to that of having your arm cut 
1 ■ off, then having it miraculously re- 
generated, then cut off again, and 
on, for eternity. (Try to avoid this 
grisly scenario at any cost) 

"But the most terrible pains of 
hell are supposedly the spiritual 
ones a soul suffers because it has 
been permanently banished mom 




THE 

PFARR 

CORNER 

Jerry Pfarr 



so 



FROM PAGE C4 



Strong military force is key 




ien I accepted the invi- 
tation of Harold A. 
Fritz, civilian aide to 
the Secretary of Army 
Illinois (South), to spend a few days 
with the troops at Fort Knox, Ky, I 
never expected to learn so much 
about life in the army. What I did 
learn surprised me and made me re- 
alize all the more the benefits of hav- 
ing a prepared military force. 

1, along with eight other dele- 
gates from Illinois and about 26 del- 
egates from Missouri, spent three 
days in July at the U.S. Army Recruit- 
ing Command (USAREC) in Fort 
Knox where we met with the troops, 
saw military exercises and learned 
about life in the army. We were'a 
mixed group of lawmakers (includ- 
ing myself and Rep: Ron Stephens of 
Troy), bureaucrats, business leaders, 
doctors, teachers arid evei) law en- 
forcement officers. Some of us had 
previous military experience— serv- 
ing during World . WarlJ, Korea and 
Vietnam: Some were even Medal of 
Honor winners, including Fritz and 
Allen Lynch from Gurnee. For some, 
this was their first taste of military 
life. Wltile we were, there, we were all 
made honorary army recruiters, 
complete with dog tags for identifi- 
cation. 

For me the learning began at 
O'Hare Airport in Chicago where I 
met Sgt. Monica Boney. To me, she 
exemplified the perfect role model 



r~^ GUEST 

' COLUMN 



God's presence and grace." 

About heaven they wrote, 
"Though folks back from those du- 
bious 'near-death experiences' rant 
endlessly about some tunnel with 
warmth, love and light radiating 
from Its end, the fact remains: No 
one really knows. 

"Supposedly your soul will be in 
such blissful ecstasy Just to be with 
God mat nothing else will matter. 
But says who? Will God be Insulted If 
you feel like playing a few sets of 
tennis or sitting down to a plateful of 
pasta primavera? 

"Even if you are completely, ab- 
solutely, divinely happy just to know 
God is around, how long will that 
last? 

"Also, how old are you In heav- 
en? Do you stay the same age you 
were when you died, or can you pick 
an age, say 18, and stay that age for 
eternity? 

"What do you wear? Are you 
stuck wearing that same outfit you 
were buried in?" 

But, alas, the pope says heaven 
is not a physical place. 

My friend Tom says there defi- 
nitely are golf courses In hell; He 
tells of a guy who went there and 
was met by Satan, who began show- 
ing him one beautiful course after 
another. . 

The guy was delighted; this was 
not the heU he had envisioned, tt 
""wasn't New York, it was more like 
Myrtle Beach. 

"Greatl" he says to Satan. "When 
can we tee off?" 

Satan frowns and says, "That's 
the hell of ft, no clubs." 



LETTERS 





Senator 
Adeline Geo-Karis 



for young girls and really anyone 
who wants to excel in life. In the 
army for 15 years, Sgt. Boney has 
been married for 16 years. She has 
two children and three degrees — in- 
cluding her law degree. A sergeant 
first-class, she is the U.S. Army's top 
recruiter, based in the St. Louis of- 
fice. 

From Chicago we flew into 
Louisville where we were met by 
USAREC representatives and es- 
corted to Fort Knox. That after- 
noon we observed the Combined 
Arms Live Fire Exercise, known as 
CALFEX. Watching the troops in 
action during the war games was 
most impressive. I saw the awe- 
some power we need to keep our 
country safe. It really brought 
home to me that we should always 
be prepared, militarily speaking, 
because we are the envy of other 
countries and we have so much 
more to offer our citizens than 
other countries do. 

The next day we had the oppor- 
tunity to observe basic training exer- 



cises. To know the good training that 
our troops get was an inspiration to 
the rest of us. 1 was impressed with 
the camaraderie the recruits had an 
with the competent and able leader- 
ship of their officers, starting with 
the Commanding General, MG Evan 
Gaddis. 

We also saw tank simulators and 
the new Apache helicopters. One of 
my personal favorites on the tour 
was the Patton Museum. He has al- 
ways been a hero of mine and it was 
a wonderful experience to see all of 
the memorabilia and to learn more 
about his history. 

On our final day at Fort Knox, 
we were privileged to witness the 
Change of Command Ceremony. 
The outgoing commander of the 
U.S. Armory Center at Fort Knox, 
MG George H. Harmeyer, handed 
over the command to MG Burwell 
Bell 111. It was.a truly enlightening 
experience to see the parade of the 
troops and the formal military cere- 
mony. 

Overall, it was the most awe- 
some trip 1 have ever taken. I think 
the military service is a great calling, 
having served in the military myself. 
In my mind, more congressmen and 
U.S. senators should avail them- 
selves to visit bases like Fort Knox In 
order to fully realize the necessity of 
always keeping our country pre- 
pared militarily. It certainly opened 
my eyes. 



ized this sexual predator as one of 
our "greatest presidents." Does Joe 
six-pack really want a third term for 
"Sicko Bill" via "See no evil" Al? Anti- 
Clinton voters have a viable option: 

BUI Bradley to repeat. 

JohnSteinke 
Lindenhurst 
Editor's note: John Steinke 
teaches political science at College 
of Lake County. 



Destructive assistance 

Lake County is providing assis- 
tance to municipalities for their 
continuing destruction of the envi- 
ronment. The county provides in- 
spection services (Building and zon- 
ing) Sheriff deputies, etc, to villages 
by contractual "intergovernmental 
agreements." When adopting their 
land use plans, many villages Ignore 
Lake County comprehensive land 
use plans. The rapid annexations 
and development by villages has 
caused a crisis in traffic, pollution, 
police protection, schools, increas- 
ing taxes, loss of wetlands and open 
space. Recently, the county board 
asked for more inspections of soil 
erosion at developments, but the in- 
spectors indicated they are too busy 
(apparently with municipalities) and 
more or better inspections were not 
feasible. 

Because of the overwhelming 
inspection workload in municipali- 
ties, enforcement of soil 
erosion/stormwater and probably 
other standards are being abdicated 
or compromised for the entire coun- 
ty. The County of Lake providing 
bargain rate services to villages 
which cannot afford or will not allo- 



cate funds for inspectors, police, 
etc., seems to me a form of double 
taxation of unincorporated resi- 
dents and assistance to villages/de- 
velopers to continue their ecocide. 
The villages do not reciprocate 
in providing bargain rate services to 
me or other unincorporated resi- 
dents. With a dictatorial contempt 
for the public interests and a myopic 
view of the future, some villages are 
causing destruction of farmland, 
wetlands, etc. to satisfy self interests 
of both the village and developers. 

Then they ask the county to sub- 
sidize annexation/development 
madness with "agreements." When a 
village annexes, develops more terri- 
tory, this ultimately affects the entire 
county and other counties, resulting 
in county or intercounty new road 
requests, widening of roads, flood 
control, etc 

The intergovernmental agree- 
ments should be rescinded, and the 
villages should finance the mess 
their mistakes and irresponsibility 
create. Contact the county board if 
you value what remains of the Lake 
County ecosystem. 

Joseph Bogacz 
Round Lake 



Letters welcome 

Letters to the editor are wel- 
come. They should be on top- 
ics of general interest, ap- 
proximately 250 words or 
less. All letters must be 
signed, and contain a home 
address and telephone num- 
ber. The editor reserves the 
right to condense all letters. 






OBITUARIES 



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August 13, 1999 



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Ruth M. Lofcrski, age 85 of Ubertyville 
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FAULKNER 

Kathryn Faulkner (nee Portcgys) age 90 of 

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Arr. McMurrough Chapel, Ubertyville 

MIS1NSKI 

Irene M. Misinski, age 72 of Undenhurst 
Am Salata Gumee Funeral Home, Gumee 



ANDERSON 

Richard C Anderson, age 76 of Lake Villa 
Memorial Services 

ROBINSON 

Mary L Robinson, age 55 of Gumee 

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John F. Robinson 

Age 56 of Grayslake passed away suddenly Thursday, 
Aug. 5, 1999 along with his daughter and son-in-law Pamela 
and Bany Wright of Undenhurst from Injuries received In a 
private airplane accident near Campbell Airport In 
Grayslake. He was bom Sept. 8, 1942 in Sioux City, Iowa, and 
was raised In Mankato, Minn, where he was a 1960 graduate 
of Loyola High School. He was a graduate of Mankato State 
University with a degree In Business and was a former 34 
year resident of Ubertyville. John was a former District 
Service manager for Volkswagen and Toyota Automobile 
Manufacturing companies and a service manager for several 
local auto dealerships. He was a member of St. Joseph Parish 
In Ubertyville and for the past 18 years owned and operated 
Accurate Automotive In Ubertyville, 

Surviving are his wife Beverly (nee Anderson) Robinson 
of Grayslake and his son J. Scott Robinson of Ubertyville; one 
sister, Patricia Robinson of Mankato, Minn, and three broth- 
ers, Rev. Perry Robinson of Omaha, Neb., Daniel (Mary) 
Robinson and Thomas (Amanda) Robinson of Mankato, 
Minn. He Is preceded In death by his parents, Perry and 
Lucille Robinson. 

Prayer service was held at the Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Ubertyville and continued to St. Joseph Church for 
Funeral Mass. 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery in Ubertyville. 

In John's memory, contributions to Catholic Charities, 
RO. Box 1 138, Chicago, IL, 60690 would be appreciated. 

Barry V. Wright, Jr. 

Age 29 of Undenhurst, passed away suddenly Thursday, 
Aug. 5, 1999 alongwith his wife Pamela Wright and father-in- 
law John Robinson, from injuries received In a private air- 
plane accident near Campbell Airport in Grayslake. He was 
bom Sept. 13, 1969 In Iowa City, Iowa, and was a former res- 
ident of Ubertyville. He was a graduate of Ubertyville High 
School and the College of Lake County In Grayslake. Barry 
was a very accomplished carpenter and a former employee 
of Orin Pickcli Custom Homes and the Belmont 
Construction Company in Hlghwood. During his youth, he 
was a member of the Sterling Boxing Club and was a man 
who enjoyed all sports, playing poo], boating and working on 
automobiles. 

Surviving are his mother Daria (Jerry) Kertey of Hanover 
Park; his father Barry V. Wright, Sr. of Sapulpa, Ok.; one sister, 
Kelly Wright Asbury of Palatine; one brother, Frank Elsesser 
of Roscville, Calif.; paternal grandmother, Elaine Wright of 
Rock Falls and maternal grandparents, George and Jean 
Elsesser of Sterling; one uncle, John Elsesser of Sterling and 
two aunts, Cindy Newell and Karolynn Meager, both of Rock 
Falls. 

Prayer service was held at the Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Ubertyville and continued to St. Joseph Church for 
Funeral Mass. 

Interment was at Ascension Cemetery in Ubertyville. 

Pamela J. Wright (nee Robinson) 

Age 27 of Undenhurst, passed away suddenly Thursday, 
Aug. 5, 1999 along with her husband Barry Wright and her 
father John Robinson, from injuries received in a private air- 
plane accident near Campbell Airport In Grayslake. She was 
bom Nov. 13, 1971 In Ubertyville, where she was a resident 
for most of her Ufa She was a 19B9 graduate of UbertyvilJe 
High School and a 1993 graduate of Northern Illinois 
University in DeKalb with a degree in nursing. Pamela was a 
former employee of Rush Northshore Hospital in Skokle and 
was currently a nurse at the Highland Park Hospital in 
Highland Park. 

Surviving are her mother Beverly Robinson of Grayslake 
and her brother J. Scott Robinson of Ubertyville; her grand- 
mother Elizabeth Schwieger of Fairmont, Minn, and three 
uncles and two aunts. 

Prayer service was held at the Burnett-Dane Funeral 
Home, Ubertyville and continued to St. Joseph Church for 
Funeral Mass. 

Interment followed at Ascension Cemetery In 
Ubertyville. 

John I. Christie 

Age 69, a resident of Ingleslde for the past 16 years, for- 
merly of Chicago, died on Sunday, Aug. 8, 1999 at the 
Northern Illinois Medical Center In McHenry. He was bom 
on Jan. 1, 1930 In Chicago to his parents; Robert R and Mary 
Christie (nee Undsay). Mr. Christie was a building equip- 
ment maintenance engineer for the Ameritech Phone 
Company and was a U.S. Army Veteran of the Korean War. He 
was an avid fisherman and liked to work In his garden. 

He Is survived by his wife, Sarah Jane Christie (nee 
O'Steen); one son, James L (Julie) Christine of Island Lake; 
two daughters, Christina (David) Fry of KJricsvlIle and Shcri 
(Michael) Cooper of Trevor, Wis.; three grandchildren, Danny 
and Brian Fry and Tyler Christie. 

Funeral Services were held at the K. K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (the Chapel on the Lake) with Rev. Paul 
Smalley officiating. 

Interment was private at the Memory Gardens 
Cemetery In Algonquin. 

Edgar t. Bell 

Age 74, a resident of Fox Lake for the past 20 years, for- 
merly of Indiana and Elgin, died Sunday, Aug. 8, 1999 in his 
home, He was bom on July 20, 1925 In Elgin to Donald and 
Frances (nee O'Donnell) Bell, and was a Veteran of WWII 
having served In the U.S. Navy. On May 21, 1955 he was unit- 
ed In marriage to Luella (nee Howard) at St. Lawrence 



Catholic Church In Elgin. The couple had celebrated 43 years 
of marriage last May. He retired from Mctra {formerly the 
Chicago Milwaukee Railroad) on May 1, 1999 as the Road 
Foreman of Engines, after 58 years of service. He had worked 
out of Milwaukee, Wis., Jasonville, Ind. and for the post 20 
years, the Fox Lake to Chicago route. He was a member of St 
Bede's Catholic Church In Ingleslde, and was a member of 
the Knights of Columbus-SL Bede's Plus X, Council 3708; the 
American Legion Post 172 in Indiana and was the past com- 
mander 1965-1966 and again In 1970 for the FJglri VFW 
Watch City Post 1307. 

Survivors Include, his wife, Luella (nee Howard) Bell of 
Fox Lake; two brothers, Jack (Agnes) Bell of Bartlett, Thomas 
Bell of Woodstock; one aunt, Erma Ehlert of Dundee; two 
nephews, James and Tim Bell; one niece, Maryanfi Bell and 
other relatives survive. He Is preceded in death by his par- 
ents. 

Friends of the family visited at the K, K. Hamsher 
Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake). 

A Catholic Funeral Mass was celebrated at St. Bede 
Catholic Church in Ingleslde. 

Interment followed at Grant Cemetery In Ingleslde. 

Masses or donations for the Provena St. Therese Star 
Hospice, 2615 Washington St., Waukcgan, IL 60085 will be 
appreciated by the family In lieu of flowers. 

Richard J. Bardo 

Age 74 of Gumee passed away Sunday, Aug. 8, 1999 at his 
residence. He was bom Oct. 12, 1924 In Chicago and had 
made his home in Grayslake for over 38 years and presently 
of Gumee the past eight months. A veteran of the U.S. Army 
serving during WWII in the Asiatic-Pacific with one Bronze 
Star, Philippine Ubcration with one Bronze Star. Retiring In 
June, 1988 from the Woodland School District where he 
taught Social Studies. A member of St. Joseph Catholic 
Church in Round Lake. An avid pilot of small engine aircraft 
In his leisure time. 

He leaves his loving wife, Dorothy (nee Ehlert) whom he 
wed on Nov. 22, 1958 in Grayslake; sons, Tom (Jack!) Reuss of 
Wildwood, Donald Reuss of Grayslake; four grandchildren 
and six great grandchildren; and brother, Edwin Bardo of 
Chicago, He Is preceded In death by his parents, John 
(Amanda) Bardo and his brother, Clarence. 

Mass of the Resurrection was celebrated at St. Joseph 
Catholic Church, Round Lake. 

Friends and family visited at the Strang Funeral Chapel 
and Crematorium, Ltd, Grayslake. 

Interment followed at Avon Centre Cemetery In 
Grayslake. 

Mary Louise Birsch (nee Nelson) 

Age 78, a longtime resident of Pistakee Highlands, 
McHenry died Friday, Aug. 6, 1999 at the University of Illinois 
Hospital in Chicago. She was' bom on March 14, 1921 in 
Albion, Mich, to Leon and Violet (nee Wagner) Nelson. On 
Nov. 7, 1942 she was united in marriage to her husband 
Arthur Birsch in Chicago. The couple had celebrated 56 years 
of married life, last November. She retired from Montgomery 
Wards in Chicago following over20 years ofcmployment as a 
bookkeeper. 

Survivors include, her husband, Arthur L Birsch of 
McHenry; her daughter, Karen (Earl) Myhraof Ingleslde; 
three grandchildren, Syrene Cihlar or Trevor, Wis.', David 
Myhra of Ingleslde and Jeffrey (Dora) Myhra of Ingleslde; one 
great grand daughter, Jessica Cihlar of Trevor, Wis.; her sister, 
Doris V Gates of McHenry; her brother, Kenneth Nelson of 
Des Moines, Iowa; her sister-in-law, Julia Nelson of Florida 
and her three nieces, Syrene Gates of McHenry, Cheryl 
Obregon of McHenry and Donna (Bob) Haller of Crystal Lake 
and other relatives. She is preceded In death by one son, 
Leon Birsch; one brother, Robert Nelson and by her sister, 
Leone Harris. 

Funeral Services were held at the K, K. Hamsher Funeral 
Home, Fox Lake (The Chapel on the Lake). 

Interment was private. 

Herbert Gefvert 

Age 74 or Lake Forest, died Aug. 5, 1999. Owner of 
Technlsound, Antioch, manufacturers of sound equipment 
Resident of Lake Forest since 1977. Bom May 2, 1925 In 
Chicago. He had served in the U.S. Navy during WWII. One of 
the pioneers In the development of radar. Founded his com- 
pany, Technlsound In Antioch, in 1947 and held 157 patents 
related to sound engineering; and one of the developers of 
"Surround Sound." He attended Northwestern University 
and received degrees from MIT and Illinois Wcsleyan. i 

He was the loving husband of Ginny Hanson Gefvert; he 
was the father of April Walker, Randy Gefvert, Eric Gefvert, 
Heidi Anderson and Holly Gefvert; stepfather of Christopher 
Hansen, Ginny Parko and Scott Hansen;; grandfather of 
Jason, Kristy, Julie, Joshua, Shanna, Bradley/Christopher,' 
Emily, Timothy and Terri; step grandfather of six. < 

Memorial Services were held at Wenban Funeral Home, 
Lake Forest. 

Interment was private. 

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to .the 
American Heart Association, 11 17 S. Milwaukee Ave., 
Ubertyville, IL, 60048. , . 

Lauretta Buetow 

Age 77, a resident of Ingleside for the past 26 years for- 
merly of Chicago, died on Monday, Aug. 2, 1999 at her resi- 
dence. She was brim on De& 1, 1921 In Chicago, to her par- 

Please see page C7 



4 






August 13, 1999 



OBITUARIES/LEGAL NOTICES 




Lakeland Newspapers/ C7 



Continued from Page C6 

cnts, Frank and Rose Kastclik {nee 
Smnlllng), Mrs. Buetow was retired 20 
years from Illinois Bell Telephone, a 
member of the Hound Lake Senior 
Center, Antloch Senior Center, a mem- 
ber of Catholic Charities, and attended 
St. Bede Catholic Church. She loved to 
play the organ for her friends and was a 
an avid Bingo player. 

She is survived by two daughters, 
Fran (Don) Kernes ofTomah, Wis, and 
Elizabeth Stewart of Kansas City. Mo.; 
by five grandchildren, Karen (Ronald) 
Woods of Tomah, Wis., Kimberly-Ann 
(Steven) Yates of Vernon Hills, Kelly 
(Jeffrey) Palm of Chicago, Donald 
(Lorl) McKlhney of Crawfordsvllle and 
Lort Anne (Calvin) Griffin on Temple, 
Tex.; six great grandchildren, David 
John Woods, Julianne McKlnney, 
Dustln McKlnney, Krystal Anne 
Griffin, Brayden McKlnney and 
Brandyn Griffin; special nephew, 
James (Lynette) Buetow and their 
daughter,Francls Ann of California; 
many other nieces arid nephews; 
great nieces and nephews; many 
friends and neighbors and her faithful 
companions, Trixle and Puppy. She is 
preceded in death by her husband, 
Louis P. Buetow in 1980; and two sis-, 
tcrs, Irene Martlnaltls In 1997 and 
Tessle Nelbauer In 1995. 

Friends and family called at the K. K; 
Hamsher Funeral Home, Fox Lake (The 
Chapel on the Lake) 

Funeral Mass was held at St. Bede 
Catholic Church, Ingleside with Fr. Krebs 
officiating 

Interment was private at Concordia 
Cemetery, Forest Park, 

Ruthie M. Georgeson 

Age 59 of Ingleside, passed away 
Monday, Aug. 2, 1999 at her home. She 
was bom Jan. 20, 1940 in Colquitt 
County, Ga., the daughter of the lateW.P. 
and Loran (Connors) Miller. She had 
lived in Chicago before moving to 
Ingleside In January of 1988. Mrs. 
Georgeson was a member of Good 
Shepherd Lutheran Church of Lake Villa 
and the Women of the Moose Chapter 
735 of Antloch. She had worked as a bus 
driver for Laldlaw Transport of 
Grayslake, On Jan. 18, 1958 she married 
Julius D. Georgeson in Albany, Ga. 

Survivors include her husband of 41 
years, Julius; her son, Troy (Mary) of 
Paddock Lake, Wis. and her daughter, 
Wanda Tanner (Rick Folker) of Spring 
Grove; her sisters, Eardeal Ruby Bishop 
of Macon, Ga, Earllne Hickman ofTifton, 
Ga., Dorothy (Sam) Conway of Tlfton, 
Ga., Betty Burgess of Norman Park, Ga., 
Faye Tillman of McCIenny, Fla., Georgia 
Bleschke (Fred Tietz)' of Chicago and 
Cariine (Dan) True of Ottawa; and her 
brothers, Brady (Cam) Miller of Abilene, 
Tex, Bill Georgeson and Splro (Diane) 
Georgeson both of Antloch. She was the 
grandmother of Christopher, Vince, 
Randall and Carrie. She Is preceded in 
death by two sons, Dino and Demetrius 
Georgeson and two brothers, Coy and 
Johnny Miller. 

Funeral Services were held at the 
Strang Funeral Home of Antloch with 
Rev. John Zellmer of Good Shephard 
Lutheran Church of Lake villa, officiat- 
ing. 

Interment was private. 
Those desiring may make contribu- 
tions to the American Cancer Society in 
her memory. 



Paul Stanley Litchfield 

Age 86, passed away Aug. 3, 1999 at 
Coridell Medical Center in Libertyvllle. 
Paul was bom In Mt. Hope, Wis. and was 
raised in Wisconsin. He was a resident of 
Round Lake, formerly of Northlake and 
Melrose Park. He moved his family to the 
Chlcagoland area In 1943. He was an 
active member of the Northlake 
Community Methodist Church for many 
years. He was a boy scout leader and 
active In Civil Defense after WWII. He 
was a member of the Good Sam Ciub for 
many years and was currently a member 
of the Community Church of Round 
Lake. He was an avid camper. He and his' 
wife have camped in all 48 contiguous 
states and all the Canadian Provinces. He 
was also an avid woodworker. His pro- 
jects Include, spinning wheels and doll- 
houses. 

Paul Is survived by his wife, Jennie 
Lynd Litchfield- (nee, White) whom he 



wed in 1936; his daughter, Toby 
Elftmann; his grandchildren, G. Lynn 
Winter, Paul Dennis Williams and 
Roberta Beadererj his brother, Melvin 
Litchfield; four great grandchildren and 
three great, great grandchildren. He Is 
preceded In death by his parents, the Rev. 
Lucius Litchfield and Eleanor (Standorf) 
Litchfield; his brothers, Howard and the 
Rev, Floyd Litchfield; and his sister 
Dorothy Litchfield. 

Friends and family visited at the 
Strang Funeral Chapel and 
Crematorium, Ltd, Grayslake. 

Funeral Services were held at the 
Round Lake Community Church. 

Interment was at Pine Eden 
Cemetery, Woncwoc, Wis. 

Gene IL Herman© X 

Age 67 of Antloch, passed away sud- 
denly Tuesday, Aug. 3, 1999 at Victory 
Memorial Hospital, Waukegan. He was 
bom Oct. 15, 1931 In Chicago, the son of 
the late Amedlo and Catharyn (Stclmetz) 
Hcrmano. He lived In Chicago before 



moving to Antloch In 1969. He was work- 
ing In sales for Lee Butter In Elk Grove 
and had served In the U.S. Army Reserve. 
He was also a member of the Loyal Order 
of the Moose Lodge 525 of Antloch. On 
Nov. 16, 1963 he married Mary Sulfridgc 
In Chicago, 

Survivors include his wife, Mary; one 
son, Phillip (Maureen) of Round Lake; 
and two daughters, Joanne Hermano of 
Waukegan and Debbie (MOce) Effinger of 
Lake Villa; one sister, Betty Matasey of 
Antloch and ' four grandchildren, 
Anthony, Dana, Sarah and Katie. He Is 
preceded In death by one daughter, 
Roxannc and one sister, Patricia Ana. 

Funeral Services were held at Strang 
Funeral Home of Antloch, with Rev. 
Patricia Alien-Stewart of the United 
Methodist Church of Lake Vfila, officiat- 
ing 

Interment was at A. R. Dyche 
Memorial Park, London, Ky. 

In lieu of flowers, those desiring may 
make contributions to. the Antloch 
Rescue Squad In his memory. . 



PUBLIC NOTICE 
PUBLICATION NOTICE 

Attorney I.D. No. 02125994 JTO, Ltd. File No. 99-23841 

IN THE CIRCUfT COURT OF LAKE COUNTY 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
LASALLE BANK, FSB 
Plaintiff 

vs. Case Number 99CH 358 

HENRY TODD, ETAL 
Defendants 

The requisite affidavit for publication having been fifed, noUce Is hereby given you, 
Nonrecord Claimants and Unknown Owners, Defendants n the above entitled suit, 
that the said suit has been commenced In the Circuit Court of Lake County, I L, by the 
Plaintiff against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain 
mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wtL 

LOT 242 IN COLLEGE TRAIL UNIT ONE, BEING A SUBDIVISION 
OF PARTS OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NOHTHWEST 
QUARTER AND OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, 
' TOWNSHIP 45 NORTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL 
MERIDIAN ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED FEB- 
RUARY 22, 1991 AS DOCUMENT 2992051 AND CORRECTED BY 
CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED JULY 30, 1991 AS 
DOCUMENT 3046101 IN LAKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. 

COMMONLY KNOWN AS 219 BUCKINGHAM COURT, 
GRAYSLAKE, ILLINOIS 60030 
PIN 06-25-307-007 
and which said mortgage was made by Henry A. Todd and Patsy J. Todd « to 
LaSalle Bank, FSB, as Mortgagee, and recorded In the Office of the Recorder of 
Deeds In Lake County, IL, as document number 3605659; 

And for such other relief prayed; that summons was duty Issued out of the aakl 
Circuit Court of Lake County against you as provided bylaw, and that tho said suit Is 
now pending. . 

NOW THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU; the sak) above defendants. IHe your anewer 
to the complaint In the said suit or otherwise make your appearance' therein; In the 
Office of the Clerk of Lake County, at the Courthouse, In the City of Waukegan, Lake 
County, IL, on or before the 13th day of September, 1999. default may be entered 
against you at any time after that day and a decree entered in accordance with the 
prayer or said complaint. 3fflRKfjH| 
Dated: Juty 2a, 1099 at Waukegan, Illinois 



James E.Trausch 
Jaros, Tittle & OToole, Umited 
20 N.Clark. Suite 510 
Chicago, IL 60602/312-750-1000 



/s/SaJly a Coffert 
Clerk of the Circuit Court 
Lake County, IL 



08998-2&59-GEN 
August 13, 1999 



PUBUC NOTICE 

AVON TOWNSHIP 

TREASURER'S REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED: FEBRUARY 28, 1999 

TOWN FUND ™,qnor» 

BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 549,309.09 

REVENUES: PROPERTY TAX 493,978.08: REPLACEMENT TAX 1 8,571 .57: 
" INTEREST INCOME 32.045.26: RENTAL INCOME 1 1 ,062.00: 

MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 1,362.54: WINCHESTER HOUSE 
REIMB 321 ,262.30: COMMUNITY ROOM 645.00; HEALTH INS 
REIMBURSEMENT 2,724.00: 
TOTAL REVENUES JSI'Som 

LESS-EXPENDfTURES SSS'S 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 624,230.33 

S^Se'SSeRSON 22.691.68: ANTIOCH ^^5SSK2SS,£ 
BAUER 2.100.00: HELEN A. CASSIDY 19,767.53: CDW COMPUTER CENTERS INC 
1 164 67- CENTRAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES 42,846.00: RUSSELL E. CHRIST- 
^SeSSSSm ENVIRONMENTAL 1,33750: COMMONmALTH EDISON 
r ODfi 4Q- mUNTY OF LAKE 9,945.00: DAM. SNELL & TAVEIRNE, LTD. 2,850.00. 
DELS : ELECTFUC SERvTCE IS/MR WILLIAM T. DONAHUE 2,100.00: USOP 
mSMMSmBSS&SunP CHI/MILW DISTRICT 1.368.99: ENV1RON- 
MB^TBWnSlO^S^ FIRST OF AMERICA 93,165.12: GROWER 
EQUIPMENT ^SUPPLY CO 3.295.00: HOTEL PERE MARQUETTE 1.029^1: IL 
PROPERTY ASSESSMENT INST 1,397.50: AMERITECH 2,193.03: ILL DEPT. OF 
R^^i^^l^MUNICRAL RETIREMENT 33.637.84: AMERITECH 
^ 406 46 KEN DAMICO 2.670.00: KRISTOFOR LARSON 4.984.00: LAKE COUNTY 
TREASURER 32V262.30 LAW OFFICES OF MAGNA & HAUSER 1 .635.00: KATH- 
LEEN M LENNON 21 1.879.95: MARILEE A. LUCASSEN 12,858.15: MARLENE 
OPLAWSKI 4,868.90: MARKET FINANCIAL GROUP 6.820.00: NICOR 1,009.84: 
CHARLES OPLAWSKI 2.100.00: MARLENE OPLAWSKI 49,649.84: JACK W. 
SS5SonSoSS: R COH 4,1 60.00: JANICE A. ROTH 32,151 .15: PENELOPE 
R RUSSELL 30 ^933 40: DEBBIE A.TAYLOR 30,120.92: TOWNSHIP OFFICIALS OF 
U^\S^^SvSsm^mVK 1,479.30: US POSTMASTER 652.00; 
USCM/MIDWEST 9,352.90; WISCONSIN DEPT OF REVENUE 1,151.28: 
LESS - PAYROLLTAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS 

INCLUDED ABOVE: S'Sfln 

TOTAL OTHERS LESSTHAN $1,000.00 J2 wl't! * 

TOTAL TOWN FUND 806.7Z9.&1 



GENERAL ASSISTANCE 
BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 
REVENUES: PROPERTY TAX 81 ,250.51: 

■ INTEREST INCOME 12,519.41 
TOTAL REVENUES 
LESS-EXPENDITURES 
ENDING FUND BALANCE 

MM E MO|KeALTH EDISON 2,243.04: COMMONWEALTH EDISON 1,088.54: 
SSmKs FINER FOODS, INC. 2,643.50: EAGLE FOOD CENTER #145 6,835.93: 



229.124.67 



93,769.92 

91,135.19 

231,759.40 



FIRST OF AMERICA 10,320.32: GLADYS HOWSAM 1 .025.00: AMERITECH 548.28: 
ILL DEPTr OF REVENUE .1,010.52: ILL MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT 4,350,26: 
JEWEL FOOD STORES 2,295.19: SUPER KMART CENTER 4938 1,073.30: KATH- 
LEEN M. LENNON 12,203.33: AMERICAN DRUG STORES 1,795.66: JOYCE F. 
PETERSON 23,149.92; U S POSTMASTER 256,00: VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE 
BEACH 2,229.47; WALMART PHARMACY 1,703.44: 
LESS - PAYROLLTAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS 

INCLUDED ABOVE: 'I 10,455.55 

TOTAL OTHERS LESSTHAN $1,000.00 26,81 9.08 

GENERAL ASSISTANCE TOTAL 91,135.19 



FOOD PANTRY 
. BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 

REVENUES: MISCELLANEOUS DONATIONS 636.00: 

TOTAL REVENUES 

LESS-EXPENDfTURES 

ENDING FUNO BALANCE 
EXPENDITURES: 

LESS - PAYROLLTAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS 

INCLUDED ABOVE: 

TOTAL OTHERS LESSTHAN $1,000.00 

FOOD PANTRY TOTAL 



7,151.15 

836.00 

10351. 

7,863,64 



348.00 
451.51 
10351 



ROAD & BRIDGE FUND 
BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 122,252,22 

HEVENUES: PROPERTYTAX 59,48955; REPLACEMENT TAX 14,011.76: 

INTEREST INCOME 7,159.96: MISCELLANEOUS INCOME 3.64: 
TOTAL REVENUES 80664 81 

LESS-EXPENDITURES 44,864.07 

ENDING FUND BALANCE 158,052.96 

EXPENDITURES: 

ACE HARDWARE 1 ,344.15: BONNELL INDUSTRIES 7.057.35; CELLULAR ONE- 
CHICAGO 1,900.63: DELS ELECTRIC SERVICE 77.87: FIRST OF AMERICA 
699.88: GROWER EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY.CO ,1,19950: HERMAN BROTHERS 
1,768,15: ILL DEPT. OF REVENUE 89.68: ILL MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT 398.22: 
AMERITECH 1,924.69: LAW OFFICES OF MAGNA & HAUSER 2504.69: LONG' 
LAKE LUMBER C0 17.64; MARILEE A. LUCASSEN 3,234.60: MARKET FINANCIAL 
GROUP 9.382.00; RAfc INDUSTRIES 240.85: SID HARVEY 1,990.80: TIPPET 
INC. 1,128.00: US POSTMASTER 256.00: VILLAGE OF GRAYSLAKE 2.063.93: VIL- 
LAGE OF ROUND LAKE 1,392.77: VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE BEACH 1,291.88: 
LESS - PAYROLLTAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS 

INCLUDED ABOVE: M 139 84 

TOTAL OTHERS LESSTHAN $1,000.00 5,040.63 

ROAD & BRIDGE FUND TOTAL 44,864.07 



727,188.43 



667,235.88 
512,595.50 
881,828.79 



PERMANENT HARD ROAD 
BEGINNING FUND BALANCE 
REVENUES: PROPERTY TAX 623,533.81: 

INTEREST INCOME 43,702.05: 
TOTAL REVENUES 
LESS-EXPENDITURES ' 
ENDING FUND BALANCE 
EXPENDITURES: 

AJ. BAILLARGEON TRUCKING 9,06558: ACE HARDWARE 1,374.69: PATRICK E. 
ANDERSON 22,691.64: A-TIRE COUNTY SERVICE INC 14,644.74; AVALON 
PETROLEUM COMPANY 1,893.33: AVON SEWER & WATER 57,250.00: BONNELL 
INDUSTRIES 1.03Z84: BUCOM. INC. 1 ,31 455: CENTRAL MANAGEMENT SER- 
VICES 25.740.00: CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT 6,912.00: COMMONWEALTH EDI- 
SON 18,644.82: COMMONWEALTH EDISON 2558.99: COMPLETE TREE SER- 
VICE 14,739.00: CURTIS INDUSTRIES. INC.. 1.147.55: FENCES-' BY TONY 
1,928.06; FIRST OF AMERICA 39,180.91: GRAYSLAKE FEEO SALES INC 
1,259.47: ILL DEPT. OFl REVENUE ' 3,070.T7:;MJL MUNICIPAL RETJREMEKT 
: 17.69*26: IMC SALT INC: 13.e04.«;)ND^^ 

1.210.21* ROBEPrr D. KULA A0,4©0.10l LAKE COUNTY TFlANSPOwAl lOM 8Y» 
* 16^0oTlC^UU^^MBER .CO 6.374:32; MARKET FINANCIAL OROLt£ 
»3S42So*MOHHtft*ENGINEERING; INC. '■! 1.860.00: MOTORCADE UNLIMITED 
•3,858:42: MUNDELEIN DISPOSAL SERVICE 7.632.42: NICOR 1.989.95: 
PETERSEN SAND & GRAVEL INC 4.097.42: PETER BAKER & SON CO. 90,450.79: 
R.A. ADAMS : ENTERPRISES. INC. 1,173.33: R.AK INDUSTRJES >±-*£**jte 
RAUSCHENBERGER LANDSCAPE 2,575.00: RAY SCHRAMER A CO 5,401.05: 
RON WALKER SEWER « WATER CONST 2.300.00: SID HARVEY 36.00: U& FIL- 
TER LAKE BLUFF 6.083.09: UNOCAL 2.234.33; USCM/MIDWEST 2,875.00: 
ANTHONY J. VALLANGO JR 41,085.66: VULCAN 6.13257: WILLIAM R WEDGE 
39,672.70: 

LESS • PAYROLLTAXES AND ADJUSTMENTS 

INCLUDED ABOVE: 5I, ?!!~ 

TOTAL OTHERS LESS THAN $1 ,000.00 B £"^ 

PERMANENT HARD ROAD TOTAL 512595.50 

CERTIFICATION 

I R E. CHRISTIAN, SUPERVISOR of AVON TOWNSHIP. LAKE. Illinois do hereby 
certify that the above Is a true copy of the Annua! Treasurer* Report for the fiscal year 
ending FEBRUARY 2B, 1999. 




R.E. Christian. SUPERVISOR 



0899B-2854-GL/RL 
August 13, 1999 
August 20, 1999 



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C8 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



August 13, 1999 



*amla*$ifiecl £mfuidi 




Personals 125 

Auctions .130 

Business Personals 135 

Financial 140 

" tmptayr, 

Help Wanted Part-Time T. .219 

Help Wanted Full-Time .> 220 

Employment Agencies 221 

Business Opportunities . .225 

Situations Wanted 228 

Child Care '.'. .240 

School/Instruction 250 






Antiques : . .301 

Appliances 304 

Burter/Tradc 308 

Bazaars/Crafts 310 

Building Materials 314 

Business/OrOcc Equipment 318 

Electronics/Computers .320 

Farm Guide 324 

Firewood 328 

Ouragc/Rummagc Sales . . . 330 

Good Tilings To Eat 334 

Horses & Tuck 338 

Household Goods/Furniture .340 

Jewelry .344 

Luwn/Gardcn .348 

Clothing 349 

Miscellaneous 3S0 

Medical Equip/Supplies .354 

Musical Instruments 358 

Pets & Supplies 360 

Restaurant Equipment 364 

Tools & Machinery < • ■ -368 

Wanted To Buy 370 

'■■':»... .-■ . . ..: 

I Ionics For Sale 51)0 

I Ionics For Rent 504 

Homes Wanted 508 

Homes [Builders 510 

Condo/Town Homes 514 

Mobile Monies 518 

Apartments For Rent 520 

Apartments Wauled .524 

Apt/Homes To Sliare . . .528 

Rooms For Rent .530 

Buildings .533 

Business Property For Sale 534 

Business Property For Rent 538 

Investment Property S40 

Mortgage Services 544 

Farms .548 

Vacant Lots/Acreage .560 

Resorts/Vacutinn Rentals 564 

Out Of Area Property 568 

Cemetery Lots 570 

Real Estate Wanted 574 

Real Estate Mi.se 578 



^r. 



credtloital 

Recreational Vehicles 704 

Snowmobitcs/ATVs 708 

Boats/Motors/Etc ; .710 

Camping 714 

Travel/Vacation 718 

Spurts Equipment 720 

Airplanes .724 



*■'. ": ' 



Cars For Sale 



— trcmijiortfitlofi j 

■ 



.804 



Rental/Leases 808 

Classic/Antique Cars 810 

Services & Farts 814 

Car Loans/Insurance 818 

Vans 824 

Four Wheel Drive/Jeeps 828 

Trucks/Trailers 834 

Heavy Equipment 838 

Motorcycles .844 

Wanted To Buy ■ . •••-••• •• •••••••• • • ■ 8 ' 48 

ilk . ■« i ttfc id Hrttff iVl.Tr "■lnY*.'rfi v i «W.yi >. 

Appliances Repair S03 

Blacktop S06 

Builders S09 

Carpentry S12 | 

Carpet Cleaning SIS 

Concrctc/Cemcnt SI8 

Dry Wall S21 

Education/Instruction S24 

Electrical '••••. S27 

Firewood .S30 

Handyman -S33 

Heating/Air Conditioning S36 

Housekeeping S39 

Landscaping .S42 

Laundry/Cleaning S45 

Legal Services .S48 

Medical Services S5 1 

Moving/Storage S54 

Painting Decorating S57 

Paralegal/Typing Services S60 

Plumbing S63 

Pools S66 

Pressure Washing 4 -S69 

Professional Services S72 

Radio/TV Repair S75 

Remodeling .S78 

Resumes . , ,S8 1 

Roofing/Siding . .S84 

Storage S87 

Tax Service .590 

Trccs/Plarttt ' S93 

Wedding S96 

Miscellaneous S99 



& 



istriiution 



Kenosha 
County 



TWIn Ukes Silver Lika~-:-.'vr-v Bristol 



Richmond 



Spring 
Grovo 



Johntburg 



MeHonry 



CryiUl 

Liko 

McIIenry 
County 



Antloch 



® 



Uko 

Villi 



Undenhunt 



FoxUka 



Konoihi 



.Jtound Uka 



Lake* 



Oraytlaksl 



MTU burn ■■ _,„ 

®zion 
Widiworth 

i Gumw . 

Waukeginl 
Park 
'City 



liland Lake' 




Mundelaln 



North 
g^n Chicago 

Ooka" 



Wuuconda 



North 
Barrlnoton V Lake Zurich 

Klideer 



© 



Vernon Ubertyyllle 



Him 



Laka Forest \ 



Darrlngton 



Long 
Grove 



Highland Park 



Deerfleld 



Palatine 
Cook County 



Buffalo Grove 



Northbrook 






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Antloch News • Round Lake News • Lake Villa Record 

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Wauconda Leader • Liberfyville News 




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HEALTHY WOMEN 

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Healthy women, age 20-33. 

needed to serve as anonymous 

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DEAR BIRTHMOTHER 

OUR PROMISE TO YOU 

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Devote & commit our lives to 

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ETC., excellent condition, 
best offer. (847) 731-2028. 




) 






I 



115 



Lost & Found 



Call Paula or Denise to 

place your ad. 

Call 847.223.8161 



RELAX WITH HYPNOSIS 

When you relax, you slow 

down your whole body and 

mind, allowing you to correct 

problems that need to be 

changed, such as: smoking, 

lose weight, phobias and 

more. Start enjoying your life. 

Call The Hypnosis Center for 

Habit Control. 

David E, Wold cHI 

HynotheraplBt. 

(847) 816-4951 

24 hr. voice mall. 

128 Newberry Ave., 

Libertyvllle. 

Room 8. 

By appointment only. 



FOUND DOG WEDNES- 
DAY, June 16th, In AM, vicini- 
ty in park across from Wau- 
conda library. Older male, Col- 
lie/Shepherd mix, long hair, 
brown/black, no tags. Very 
sweet. (847) 526-5848. 

LOST BIRD AFRICAN 
GREY, NAME "MAX", AT 
GAGES LAKE. (847) 
548-2124. 

DID YOU FIND Someones 
PET or Special Lost Article? 
Call Lakeland Newspapers 
Classifieds Dept., and get your 
results, FOUND ads are 
RUN FREE of Charge. Call 
(847)223-8161, 



120 


Free 



WE DO NOT KNOWINGLY 
ACCEPT ADS FOR ANI- 
MALS IN OUR 
FREE/GIVEAWAY COL- 
UMN. For more Information, 
please contact the Humane 
Society. 



110 



Notices 



Happy Zr5 th 
irthday! ! ! ! 

MEGAN 

Love, 

Auntie 

Mary Ellen 





A BABY WANTED: ADOP- 
TION Let us give your child a 
stay-home mom, kind and 
gentle dad, playful days at the 
park behind our home, festive 
birthday celebrations and 
toads of (unloving relatives 
nearby. Can we help you? 
MOIRA & TOM (at home) Toll 
free 1-877-514-8291. 



ADOPTION WE PRAY you 

find peace In the decision 
about your baby and we hope 
your life ahead will be rich and 
full. The child you bear will be 
deeply loved by parents who 
have waited so long (or 
him/her. Your child will know of 
your courage. Let us help. 
Doctor Mom and business- 
man Dad can provide the life 
you want tor your child. Medi- 
cal, legal, counseling, and 
court approved living expens- 
es paid. Confidential. Please 
call our attorney at (700) 
957-6838. 



ADOPTION: ABSOLUTE 
LOVE. Hugs, security and 
happiness await your child. 
Let us help each other. Ex- 
penses Paid. Russell and 
Karen 1-800-590-6766. 



ADOPTION: WE PROMISE 
your baby the bast that life can 
offer - Love, Education, Travel 
and a Financially Secure Fu- 
ture. Expenses paid. Wen- 
dy/Dan 1-800-450-7164. 



BREAST ENHANCER TA- 
BLETS as seen on TV. In- 
crease size and firmness. Nat- 
ural alternative to surgery. 
Proven 86% effective, 100% 
guaranteed. 1-800-870-9938 
www.thermoslep.com (SCA 
Network). 



140 



Financial 



BANKRUPTCY S78+. 
STOPS garnishments. Guar- 
anteed valid since 1991. Di- 
vorce $99^ Low caost Debt 
Reduction and Foreclosure. 
Avoidance services available 
without bankruptcy. Fresh- 
Start 888-395-8030 

FREE MONEYI IT'S true. 
Never repay. Guaranteed. 
$500,00-350,000 and more. 
Debt consolidation, personal 
needs, medical bills, educa- 
tion, business needs. CALL 
TOLL FREE 1-800 215-2954, 

LESS THAN PERFECT 
credit? Need debt consolida- 
tion? Call Chase Manhattan 
to get the financial relief you 
need through our Innovative 
residential mortgage/re- 

finance programs. Call now! 
1-800-554-3273. ©1999. 

The Chase Manhattan Corp. 
all rights reserved. Equal 
Housing Lender. ' 

MONEY TO LOAN Home- 
Auto-Debt Consolidation. Call 
toll free 1-877.6580550 (SCA 
Network). 



Needed 



Part time 
Will do odd 
jobs in the 

building, 

general 

fix-it duties, 

processing 

recycled paper. 

Call 

223-8161 

Ask for 

Neal Tucker 



219 



Help Wanted 
Piirt-Tlme 



HOME BASED 

TELEPHONE SALES 

Setting appointments only! 

$6.00-$18,00/hour 

Plus bonuses. 
Call (888) 245-5919. 

MOTHER'S DREAM1 

WORK from home. Free 

booklet, 1-886--640-2063. 

WORK FROM HOME 

Earn an extra 

$500-$1,500PT. 

or FIRE YOUR BOSS and 

earn $2,000-$6,00 FT. 

1-800-606-3896 - 

www.freedom-Quest.net 



I I I I I I I I I 



MERCHANDISERS 

• ••••* 

Part-Time 

Opportunities! 

Work: Monday, Tuesday, 

Thursday & Fridays onlyltl 

Clms. Levy Circulating, a 
leading distributor of magarines to 
relail Mors, seeks reliable 
workers in independently 
merchandise magazines at retail 
Mores iliroutihoui the arras of 
Wankegan, Ubertyville, Crystal 
Lake, Mundelein, Algonquin. 
Vemitn Mills, Antiocli, McIIenry 
and Woodstock. Sume physical 
work will he required (I.e. lifting 
and loading merchandise). Vie 
oiler a IIIC-IILY competitive satiny 
For Immediate cimsideratiun "call: 
800-621-8210, ext. 2146 
CHAS. LEVY 
CIRCULATING CO. 
EOE 

• * * • * * 






i 






,.% -v*ii> mmm, 



estt^szb 



ota'gisqsjsa* 4pwiifc^- 



••»' — - 



■ 






S" 



August 13, 1999 



219 



ilelp Warned 
Part-Time 



219 



llclp wanted 
Part-Time 



Servers Wanted 

P/T-F/T 
Weekends a must 
Good earning 
potential ' 

Last Chance 
Saloon 

(847)223-0082 



Cook/Cashier 

Must work weekends 
& evenings. Must be 
dependable. Apply in 
person, ask for 
Donna. 
2130.E. Grand Ave. 
Lindenhurst 



Restaurant 

The Village at Mclory lakes 
Continuing Canr Center tire excit- 
ing oponnunlUei for dependable 
IndWduali to ttm our senior 
ctierlf le. FlcxiMe PAKT TIME rwjl- 
lions are available. 

wuTEi/WArntiss 

Flexible hours during lunch and 
dinner shifts are available ai our 
ur^rale.prtolc restaurant alihe j 
VllLue or Victory lakes. Starting < 
rale 17.1 l/hour. 

DIETARY ASSISTANT 
This part time, 1pm ■ 8pm, pojl- 
Uon al Victory laws Continuing 
Care Cenler is responsible for 
misting the cook In preparing 
dally menu, garnishing pules, 
salad bar prep k maintaining a 
sanitary department 

Evening, wekend and holiday pre-' 
miunu. Full benefits package anil* 
able If you work at least 40 hours 
In a two-week period. Please apply 
In person al the Continuing Care 
Center. 1055 Grand Avenue In 
Undenhunc Fh: 847-356-155 1 . 
eoe- - 



ACTIVITY AIDE 



Are you looking for a 

fun, rewarding job 

working with people 

a few hours a week? 

We are In need of 

someone to play 

cards, read, etc. to 

our residents 2-3 

evenings for 1 hour, 

and 3-4 hours on 

Sundays. Please 

contact 

Sharon Wagner or: 

Apply In person at: 

Care Centre of 

Wauconda 

176 Thomas Ct 

Wauconda, IL 60064 

847-526-5551 



NICASA has two pan time positions available In 

Client Services 

at its Round Lake Office. One position will be Tiies.. Wed,, & 
Fri. from 5:30 pm. until 7:30 pm and Sal. from 8:00 am. 
until 4:00 pm. Responsibilities include customer contact, 
filing, word processing, cash receipts and phone coverage. 
Good communication skills and being part of a team 
are necessary. Bilingual (Spanish) a plus. 
Send or fax resume to 
Rac Anne Yost. Human Resources Administrator 
3 1 979 N. Fish Lake Road 
Round Lake. IL 60073 
FX 847r546-6760 

EOE ■•■■• ' 



i 



: ' School Bus Monitors/ | 

Drivers Aides 



|.i:*.'lit.llit-.mli: (.110JV**? 



"&ng ifxr foch to wo* 
-they my ndepn tpur route 



A^fJpadho4dri/j 
TVidl/cIrMmw-IS.000 

'Cof^xTLj Abated lOlfkJ 

'OcMvp tulor>reir*i 
True Lood Infkxpa buttle 






nOpfo 
,70/fr 



, Slt,4ol Tu/ttfwUtwn 

3625 W. Westihgton. Pert C't) IL 



'■' S3 



LET'S TALK 



Do you like to earn money, but 

not work long hours? Do you 

enjoy talking on the phone? 

Then give me a call. Excellent 

sales opportunities are available 

in Lakeland's Classified Sales 

Dept. Telemarketing 

experience preferred 

but not required. 

Send resume or request 
for application to: 

Attn: M. Combs 

Lakclaiid Newspapers 

P.O. Box 268 
Grayslake, IL 60030 

or Fax 



CLASSIFIED 




Lakeland Newspapers I 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



219 



llclp Wanted 
Part-Time 



CLERK-TYPIST with 

high school diploma. 
Minimum 2 years hands- 
on clerical and word 
processing experience 
required. Need depend- 
able, task-oriented, inde- 
pendent worker with 
excellent typing, organi- 
zational and communica- 
tion skills. Salary range 
$12,000-$2I ,000 depend- 
ing on experience. 
Excellent benefit pack- 
age. EOE. Send cover 
letter and resume to 
Patti Ogryzek, 

Central Baptist 

Children's Home 

PO Box 1128 

Lake Villa, IL 60046 
FAX 847-356-2436 



Port Time Mall room' 

Labeling, Inserting and 
sorting newspapers. Fast' 
paced and friendly envi- 
ronment Thursdays 5:00 
a.m to npprox. 2:00 p.m. 
Must be able to stand for 
long periods of time. 
Call 740-4035 




SALES 

Instead of taking a job with a high volume retailer, try a posi- 
tion in n fun environment where you are encouraged to 
know customers on a first name basis. We are looking for 
enthusiastic outgoing people with excellent customer service 
skills Tor a fast-growing 'Old Tyme" Fudge & Cindy 
Shop. If you love serving people, you won't find a sweeter place! 
Call Micheic at Something Sweet 847-838-9350. 
M-F between 1 1:00 am. and 7:00 pm. 



DELIVERY 



BRANCH ASSISTANTS 



Immediate. openings for Individuals to assist with 

day-to-day operations in branch locations. 

Responsibilities will include setting up papers 

for delivery as well as for occasional 

absence of distributor. 

Current openings in the following locations: 

• Lake Zurich • Mundelein 

• Wauconda • Vernon Hills 

• Liberlyvllle .„■ • Gurnee 

* Grayslake 

Work 3-4 hours a day with flexlbilty In starting 

and ending times: 

Starling pay is $9.62/hr. plus benefits. 

For more'informatfon call: 

(847) 427-4333 



Looking for Part Time 
Account Executive 

An exciting and challenging way to be 
introduced into the fast-paced life of 
newspaper advertising! 
Flexible Hours 
Excellent Pay 
Commission Structure 
Marketing 

Lakeland Publishers 

For more Information, 

call (847) 223-8161 

xll3 

Ask for Bob Ubner 

Advertising Manager 





$& 



EARN 
UP TO 



S//.20//?r 



• Bring your kkJs to work -they may ride on your route 
•Weekly paychecks, extra work, paid training, 

paid vacations AND paid holidays 

• AM/PM Route drivers (guaranteed hrs) 

• Charter Drivers (2i30pm) 

• Paid Life lnsurance-$5.000 & Medical Insurance Avail, i 

• Company Assisted 401(H) 

• College tuition re imp. 

• Free Local Employee shuttle 

Park City 

• (847) 244-5690 
1 3625 West Washington 

Lake Forest 

{847)680-9305. 
28477 Bradley Road I 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time 



WE NEED 

Plasma Donors 
Immediately. 

Earn $100 In the 1st 2 wksl 

For Info or appt. call 

414-654-1366 



School Cafeterias 
NO, evenings 

NO weekends 

Mundelein Dist. 76 

Grayslake Dist. 127 

Call Vicky 

847-223-8621 

ext. 1700 

EOE 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed classified 
advertising with the Lake 
(and New* papers you may re- 
ceive a misleading statement 
from another firm request 
in g payment for this advertis- 
ing. To receive proper cred- 
it to your account, all pay- 
ments for your . Lakeland 
Newspapers advertising 

must be made as Invoiced 
and directed to; 

Lakeland Newspapers 

PO Box 386 

30 S. Whitney St. 

Onyslake, IL 00030-0368 



$ SSS 5 S S S 5 



Earn Extra Income 

Weekly paychecks 
working from home. 
Your choice of evenings | 
j nd/cr weekend}. 
Scheduling appoint- 
ments to pickup 
discarded household - 
items for well-known 
charitable organization. 
Minimum 4-6 hours a 
week. Please call ~ 
(630) 515t57S2 



HssasrinHaaj 



AND PET PAID 

PSYCHOLOGY, 

SOCIOLOGY. SPEECH 

THEHAPY, EDUCATION. 

SOCIAL WORK, OT. PT 

AND ALL OTHER 

MAJORS needed 

immediately to work one on 

one with an adorable 
3 1/2 yr. old autistic boy in 
his home. He can't learn 
without your help. We will 
provide training to teach 
language, play, social and 

imitation skills, through 
effective behavioral modifi- 
cation methods. We are 
one of Dr. Lo vans' repli- 
cation sites, implementing 
the most effective one on 
one therapy for autism. 
Part time to full time hours, 
flexible 2-3 hour shifts. 
Pay starts at S7.00 per 
hour, plus paid travel time. 
FLEXIBLE SCHEDULES! 
2-3 ML/SESSIONS 
ADVANCEMENT AVAILABLE! 
ONE YEAR OF COLLEGE 
REQUIRED! 
PAID TRAINING 
BUILD YOUR RESUME 
GAIN FIELD EXPERIENCE 
For an application call: 

Wisconsin Early 
Autism Project 

414-479-9798 

We currently have openings 

In the Wiimot/Trevor area 
with a 3 1/2 yr. old adorable 
boy ready to begin therapy. 



219 



Help Wanted 
Part-Time - 



MEN AND WOMEN 

nffdeii 

to help clean 

homes in the 

McIIenry area 

Flexible hours. 

Call 815- 385- R438 



Pampere* 

needs more consultants 
to demonstrate Quality 
kitchen tools at home 
kitchen shows. Average 
$15/$20hour 
commtssian. No 
experience 
necessary. 
Coll Undo 

(847) 
249-1015 



HELP WANTED 

MONrTOR-PARTTIME 

To maintain order and security In 
the library Monday-Thursday from 
4 - 9: 1 5 p.m. Must work wtfl with 
people of all ages. Ability lo speak 

Spanish helpful. 
Computer experience highly desir- 
able. Employment begins ■ 
September I999; *900Vhour. 
Review of resumes begins August 
16. Applications and Job descrip- 
tions available at Gmiinion Desk, 
Round lake Area Library 
906 Ilait Road, Round lake. 



Cleaning service . 
looking for part- 
time help. Flexible 
hours. (Residential 
& commercial) 
Call Staci 




Pro-Maids 
Professional 

Cleaning Service 



GENERAL 



OFFICE 

Busy Chiropractic office in 
: Grayslake, Is seeking a 
mature, honest, health ori- 
ented individual to run the 
front desk. Part-time 
evening hours: MWF: 
2-7pm & Tues/Thurs: 
2-6pm. Duties include gen- 
eral office, answering 
phones, collections, and 
assisting the doctor at 

times. $8.007hr. + 

bonuses. Call Dc John® 

(847) 543-1055 



CUSTODIAL 

WAUCONDA 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

15-20 hrs/wcek. 
hardworking, 
person to clean 
and maintain library 
building 
and grounds. 
No exp. necessary. 
Salary is $8.50- 
$10.O0/hr. 
Applications are avail- 
able at Circulation 
Desk, or contact 
Keith Jacobson, 
Facility Manager. 

(847) 528-6256 
Ext. 230 



<■••■**» 



Now accepting Interviews 
end applications! 




DELIVERY 



;earaup:;to:$200 
be your own boss?: 



The Daily Herald is looking for adult, 

independent personnel for newspaper 

delivery in the Lake County area. 2-3 

hour routes available between the hours 

of 2am & 6am, Monday thru Friday; 

2am-7am, Saturdays, Sundays and . 
Holidays. 
For more information call... 

(847) 427-4333 



220 



Help, Wanted 
RiB-tlme 



1000 ENVEL- 

OPES» $4000. $4 per envoi- ' 
ope processed! I Guar- 
arrteedll 24 hour recording. 
Call (310) 6303792. 

AIM HIGH CAREER oppor- 
tunities for high school grads. 
If you're between 17-27 the Air 
Force can prepare you for a 
career In life. Benefits Include: 
High tech training, tuition as- 
sistance, medical and dental 
care, excellent pay* Up to 
$12,000 enlistment bonus for 
those who qualify. For an in- 
formation packet call 1-800- 
423-USAF or visit the Air Base 
- at www.alrforce.com 



ATTENTION 

CLASSIFIED 

ADVERTISERS 

If you have placed clamsiAed 
advertising with the Lake- 
land Newspaper! you may 
receive a misleading state* 
ment from another firm re 
questing payment for this 
advertising. To. receive prop' 
er credit lo your account, 
all payments Tor your Lake- 
land Newspapers advertising 
must be made as Invoiced 
and directed lo: 

La ke la n d Ifc asp a u e i a 

po Box see 

30 S. Whitney St. ' 
Grayslake, IL 60030-0208 




ATTENTION .^PROSPEC 
TTVE DRIVERS. We are of- 
fering 15 days of CDL training 
for local, regional & OTR driv- 
ers. This is not Just a school, 
we offer complete training and 
we guarantee you a job when 
finished. 800-937-O880. < - 

AVON PRODUCTS. 

START your own business. 
Work flexible hours. Enjoy un- 
limited earnings. Call toll free. 
880-942-4053 

DRIVER • COMPANY Driv- 
ers and Owner Operators. Call 
today and ask about our great 
new compensation and bonus 
packages. Boyd Bros. 800- 
543-8923 (OO's call 800-633- 
1377). EOE 

DRIVER - GREAT pay and 
MQh miles. Plus 100 neW, 
FrelgWHr>erm. eorfe West Coast 
09% nt>r touch. : -401K.- 
CommArv-caJb e-mmlC 
Call today. John Chrlstner 
Trucking 1-600-528-3675. 

DRIVER - OWNER, Opera- 
tors -up fo $1.00 per toedod 
mile. Tractor. Carpo Van and 
18-24ft Straight Truck owners' 
needed. Call Panther II Trans- 
portatton today. 800-640-7055. 

DRIVER - REGIONAL 
COMPANY DRIVERS - DRIVE. 
NOWI DONT f WAITI Cedar 
Valley Transport offers: Great 
pay, Home Weekends, Excel- 
lent Benefits. Call 686-791- 
9235. 

DRIVER BUD MEYER 
Truck Lines Refrigerated Haul- 
ing- $1,000 Sign-on bonus for 
exp. co. drivers "Solo drivers 
Start up to 33c. Solo drivers 
and contractors. Call toll free 
877-283-8393. Graduate 
students 1-800-338-6428 

DRIVERS • DUE to expan- 
sion of our fleet star transport 
is now hiring OTR drivers. No 
experience necessary will 
train. Full benefits, good miles, . 
For more info, on this unique 
opportunity call 1-800-548- 
6082. 

DRIVERS • TEAMS OTR: 
Assigned Frelghtliner convert- 
tiortais. excellent miles, great 
home time and morel Experi- 
enced drivers call Heartland 
Express toll free at 1-877-763- 
7483 



DRIVERS PAID WHAT 
You're Worth?? Telemarketer 
S5.25. Packing/Assembly 
$8.00. Janitorial S7.00. Ma- 
chine Operator S7.50. Want to 
do belter? Truck driver 
$30,000 to start. $35,000- 
$40,000 second year. Ameri- 
ca's #1 career. Train in just 4 
weeks. No experience re- 
quired. No money needed to 
start A lifetime bl employment 
opportunities and . GREAT 
PAY. Isnt that what it's all 
about? Call today 1-800-553- 
1044. YourYe worth IL (Ask 
about the cash while you train 
program). 

EARN EXTRA , MONEY 
Work one weekend a month 
and two weeks a year and re- 
. celve 100% college tuition, the 
Montgomery G.I. Bill and an 
excellent paycheck. You may 
also qualify for a cash enlist: 
ment bonus. .Call your local 
National Guard representative 
today at 1-800-GO-QUARD. 



i 



i 



C10 / Lakeland Newspapers 



Eg g 'tsar* I E5 



-'J Full-Time 



EEfiT 



ii Help Wanted 
■J Full-Time 



EASYWORKl 

NO EXPERIENCE 

$500- S 1,000 part-lime at 

home stuffing envelopes. 

For free Information send 

self-addressed, 

stamped envelope: 

R&J Enterprises 

Mailing Services, Inc. 

P.O. Box 402 
Ingleslde. III. 60041. 

FLATBED OWNER OP- 
ERATORS needod for re- 
gional runs *Run your plate or 
ours *Run your trailer or ours. 
LOCAL TERMINALS. COMPA- 
NY DRIVERS also needed. 
GREAT BENEFITS & HOME 
TIME. SMITHWAY MOTOR 
XPRESS 1-800-769-6522. 

GETYOURREUCENSEI 

•Job Placement Available 

*Eam Extra Income 

'Many Locations Available 

•Traditional Classes 

Starting Soon. 

For More Information Call: 

CENTURY 21 

Real Estate Academy 

(647) 296-0410. 

HAVE DOCTORS, NEED 
BILLERS. F/T, P/T Medical Bill- 
ing. No experience necessary. 
Earn up to $40K+ working at 
home. Must have IBM compat- 
ible PC. 1-800-697-7670. 
www.medlstaff.net (SCA Net- 
work). 

INSURANCE 4 DAY work 
week. Leads, advances, 
$1,000/week, statewide op- 
portunity, 5 people minimum. 
Call ASAP 1-800-252-2581. 

SECURE YOUR FUTURE. 
UP TO .37CPM TO 
STAHT/FULL BENE- 
FITS/NEW CONVENTION- 
ALS/GREAT HOME TIME. RE- 
GIONAL OR OTR DRIVERS 
NEEDED. CALL ARCTIC EX- 
PRESS 800-927-0431 
www.arcticexpress .com 

WORK FROM HOME! 
Growing communications 
company seeking outgoing 
representatives. Earn up to 
$3k per month . Full time posi- 
tion available. Flexible hours, 
can work from home. Call 800- 
891-9849 or www.excelir.com/ 
kwfox. 

WORK FROM HOMEI Our 
children come to the office 
everyday. S499+P/T- 

$8499+ F/T. For free Informa- 
tion log onto ww.hbn.com Ac- 
cess Code 5179 or call 800- 
298-6622 (SCA Network). 



Grayslake 
Childcare Center 

is looking lo fill the 

following positions 

• Lead Teacher Qualified 

•Teacher Assl. Qualified 

in open infant/toddler room 

and 3-4 yr. old room 

•Aide Assl. 

I2pm-Gpm 

(Great for college student) 

Call (847) 548-4FUN 



Collections 

Sr. Collections/ 

Credit 

Associates 

Join America's largest privately 
held manufacturer & distributor 
of medical products and sup- 
plies, due.lo our rapid expan- 
sion! Excellent opportunities 
arc available for professionals 
with experience in collections 
and/or credit. Responsibilities 
include collecting customer 
statements, making credit 
inquiries lo establish credit lim- 
its and various related duties. 

Excellent advancement 
opportunities are available. 

You owe it lo yourself lo 

explore this opportunity! 

. Earning potential from S14 

%20/hi (total compensation 

package). Send resume with 

salary history to: 

Medline Industries, Inc. 

HR Dept.-COL 
, One Medline Place 
iJ^Mundclejri, IL 60060 

- Fax: (847) 949-2109. 
E-inaJl: IcweihsQrnedlinc com 
EOE - 



MEDLINE 



v- 



I 



HUMAN 
RESOURCES 
GENERALIST 

The largest privately held man- 
ufacturer & distributor of med- 
ical supplies & equipment In 
die U.S seeks a high -energy, 
resulu-oriented HR Gencnilisl 
to join our team. The generallsl 
will assist In employee 
relations, recruitment, gov't, 
reporting £ other HR activi- 
ties. The Ideal candidate will 
possess a BA Degree & 2-5 
years experience in Human 
Resources. Bilingual (Spanish) 
Is a plus. 

To investigate our attractive 

salary & benefits, please send 

resume with salary history In 

confidence to: 

Medline Industries, Inc. 

UK DepL-HRG 

One Medline Place 

Mundeleln, IL 6006 

Fax: (847) 949-2109 

E-mail: 

kwelhs@mcdllne.com. 

E OF, ni/f/d/v 

I 



CLERICAL 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Mldweslcrn Regional Medical 

Center Is a suttMif-lrnvarl facility 

spcdalWng In Oncnlngy & p-Jtt trf 

CanciT Tn-Jlnu-nl Centers irf 

America, a natlimal IcauVr (n Innnvj- 

Utv ranctf care. Vie are Iwkfng fur 

ft*pun.<iMc nnifttMwuls to ["In us 

for these Immediate upentngs: 
.SECRFTARY-Suppurt hlgli-levd 
exes. In this part-time flexible role. 
SecMarfol wp. ft sunerlnr K >kllb 
■in a muM. Pnwerpitlnl/Excd bark* 
gmund is helpful. 
REfilSTRATlOSffiWITCtlBOARD. 
Full-time upentngs working (ki-2:jl>p 
Kith wkml. mljtion nr pirl-llme 
wknd Jjjs Mirklng I la-?:.Vtp. 
Applies nis MIST rim- wknrf avail- 
ability. 

Tt> colore our excellent cirnipensa- 
linn package, please send resume U> 
Midwestern Regional Medical 
Center, IIR Depl., 2520 Ellsha 
Ave., Hon, IL 60099- 
FAX 847-872.6222. 
EOE rii/fld* j^j 

Tnniumm s llnspllal It tierv TikIjv 
wxvw.tancfitenlercnm 



Legal Secretary/Administrative Assistant 

Tired of commuting lo the loop? Be part of a prestigious 
Chicago law firm specializing In family law, while working In 

our Lake Forest office. We need a highly organized legal 
secrelary/admlnlstralive assistant with strong technical 

skills. Proficiency In WP8.0 for Windows and background 
In divorce litigation a plus. Team player a must. Office near 
Ihe train. Salary commensurate with ability and experience. 
Groat benefits. Fax or send resume to Katcheim, Schatz & 
Berger, Attention: Dorothy, 161 N. Clark, Chicago, IL 60601 
(Fax 312-782-8463). 



1OOM0B OT HO x S 
CLASSIFIED 



Gee i'i uirauk 

August 13, 1999 



Au 



SUBSTITUTE 
DIRECTORY 



The following schools need 

substitutes on a continuing basis, please contact the 

names listed below for further information. 

\ntioch Community High School District #117 
1 133 Main St.. Aiitiocli. 1L60002 

Contact: Marie x22<l (847) 395-1421 

Anllocli Elementary School District #34 
800 N. Main St.. Anlioch. 11,60002 

Contact: PeRgy (847) 838-8400 

Aptakistic - Tripp School District #102 
1231 Wetland Road, Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

Contact: Laurel Karolczak (847) 634-533? 

Big Hollow School District #38 
34699 N. liwy 12, Ingleslde, IL 60041 

Contact: Ms. Buclmer (847) 5S7-680C 

Dcerfield School District #109 
517 Dcerflcld Road, Deerfietd. 11.60015 

Contact: Dcnise MClcmonl x232 (847) 945-181- 

Fox Lake Grade School District #1 14 
101 Hawthorne Lane, lbs Lake, IL 60020 

Contact: Hill Lotnas (847) 587-253' 

Grass Lake School District #36 
26177 W. Grass Lake Road, Antloeh, IL 60002 

Contact: Patti or Sue (847) 395-1550 

Grayslake Community High School, District #127 
400 N. Lake St., Grayslake. IL 60030 

Contact: Lana Madole x!2IO (847) 223-8621 

Grayslake School District #46 
625 N. Barron Blvd., Grayslake, IL60O30 

Contact:^ Fabiy xllOO (847) 223-3650 

Hawthorn School District #73 

201 Hawthorn Parkway, Vernon I .ills, IL 60061 

Contact: Shari Keena (847) 367-3279 

Johnsburg School District #12 
2002 W. Riiifiwocxl. Johnsburg. IL 60050 

Contact: Diane Kofler (815) 385-9233 

Lake Forest Elementary Schools 
95 W. Doerpalli, Like Forest, IL 60045 

Contact: Karen Allie (847) 604-7423 

Lake Villa School District #41 
131 McKinlcy; Lake Villa, IL 60046 

Contact: Kathy (847) 356-2385 

Spring Grove District #11 

2018 Main Street, Spring Grove, IL 60081 

Contact:)™* (815)675-2342 

WaticoriOa School District #118 
555 N. Main, Wauconda, IL 60084 

ContachH x!04 (847) 526-7690 

Woodland School District #50 
17370 Gages Lake Rd, Gages Lake, IL 60030 
CoMfoCrVMIchcllc (847) 856-3605 






EH 



|| Help Wanted 
'* Full-Time 




r 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



PRODUCTION 
SUPERVISOR 

Immcd Opening. 
Kendal Packaging, a 
corrugated packaging 
co. loe'd near Comiskcy 
Park, hits immcd open- 
ing on 2nd shift for 
Production Sprvsr. Must 
possess 3+yrs cornigal- 
ed supervisory cxp. Will 
supervise production of 

flexo folder gluers, 

roiary & flat die eqpml. 

Familiarity w/shlpping 

& malcrial handling a 

plus. Resume; Welch 

PkgGrp, Attn: IIR-PS, 

1020 Herman St. 

Elkhart, IN 46516; 

Fax 219-295-0231 



MAINTENANCE 
OPPORTUNITIES 

Miillinc Industries, Inc., a leading 
manufacturer & dislrihiiltir nf 
nunlical pnxliictg, his iliu-c 
Immediate opportunities In the 
Maintenance Ui-pl. at otir 
Mumleleln Corporate 
Elracftjuartcrc: 

MAINTENANCE MECHANIC 

Ideal candhlale will haw prior 
experience with Inji-cUrm molding 
machines plus working kniwlcdgc 
of li}drau!lcs, ck-clrlcal, chillers & 
compressors; hackprnund will) 
P.LC's a plus. 

FACILITIES ASSISTANT 
Tills enthusiastic, si'lf-mitllv-juil 
(ram plaux wtiii the ability to swirk 
fndepcndenilywill have 3-5 yrs. 
maintenance experience & hroail 
kniittUilpc «f mechanical, 
electrical, plumbing «. hiilc 
carpentry skills. 
Fur cnnsldcrJllon, please send 
resume wlili salary expedition In: 
MEDUNE INDIOTRIES. INC. 
C/OStntnFaln 
One Medline Place 
Mundclein, IL o<Htf.0-HB6. 
Fat: (W7) «)7«-it»2i. M ^UME 



HEAVY PRESS OPERATOR 

Growing Lake County manufacturing co. has an immediate 

opening for heavy press operator on its day shift. No prior 

experience necessary. We will train you. Applicant must 

have mechanical aptitude and reliable work history. 

Excellent starling wages and benefits available. 

Apply En person at: 

Air-Drive, Inc. 
4070 Ryan Road 
Qurncc, IL 60031 



ULINE IS GROWING! 



Ullne - The Shipping Supply Specialists. 

Since 1980 Uline has experienced strong 

growth. We now have 4 distribution centers 

across the country and a 5th on the way. 

Come grow with us. 

Warehouse Opportunities 

{AT OUR WAUKEGAN FACILITY} 

• 1st shift: 10:30 a.m.-7 p.m. (S9,45/hour)SS 

• 2nd shift: 7:00 p.m.-3:30 a.m. ($9.45 plus .70 shift 
differential)^ 

• Competitive salary for 2-5 years experience. SSSS 

• 401 k savings. SSSS 

Warehouse uniforms are provided at no cost. SSSS 

• Year-end performance bonus. SSSS 

• Medical/Life Insurance. 

• Educational reimbursement up to S1 ,000 a year. 

• 16 paid days off/B paid holidays each year. 

• Workout room, sauna, and jogging trails. 

• Close to I-94 and 137. 

For consideration complete an application or send 
resume to our Human Resources Recruiting Center. 



ULINE 



Shipping Supply Specialists 

950 Albrecht Drive 

Lake Bluff, IL 60044 

Fax: (888) 847-0354 

Mechanic 



TUNE UP OUR 
GROWING FLEET 



.at our Prairie View facility. 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



MAINTENANCE 



Seeking honest, 
hardworking, depend- 
able Individuals for 
Maintenance. FULL 
and PART-TIME posi- 
tions available In 
Lake County. The 
successful candidate 
must possess mainte- 
nance and janitorial 
skids and must be 
able to work with and 
around others. 
Paperwork also 
required. Full-time 
compensation pack- 
age Includes health 
I Insurance, 401 K and 
paid vacation. 
Interested parties, 
please send your 
resume and or letter 
of Inquiry to: 

Box 000 

c/o Lakeland 

Publishers 

RO Box 268 

[ Grayslake. IL 60030 



Seeking Early 
Childhood Teachers to 

work at our Child 

Care Center located In 

Long Grove! 

Wc arc seeking Teachers 
who have experience work- 
ing with Infants, Toddlers 
and Twos. If you always 
wanted to work in a new 
center here Is your chancel 
Wc will provide you with 
the framework and flexibil- 
ity to create age appropri- 
ate curriculum to help chil- 
dren grow In all areas. We 
offer excellent benefits - 
tuition reimbursement, 
401(k), medical, dental, 
vacation, sick pay and 
more! If you are an enthu- 
siastic individual and are 
dedicated to Early 
Childhood Education call 
our 24-hour job line at 

(888)348-2991 cxt.1641or 
Fax resume to 
(630)221-1293 EOE 




A manufacturer of food service equipment lias an immediate opening In 
our Service Depl. Job duties include handling service alls, arranging 
for senice In live field, department coordination work and backup for 
parts order entry. The Ideal candidate will luve at least I year experi- 
ence In customer service, a good phone personality, die ability to diag- 
nose problems over the phone and be customer focused. We offer 
salary commensurate with experience and a very good fringe package. 
Vl'e are a iioii-siuoking facility Send/fax resume or 
calf Patrick Walker at 



CARTER-HOFFMANN Corp. 
1551 McCofmick Ave. Mundefein, IL 60060 

847/362-5500. cxt. 2344 

ftix: R47/367-898 1 



ushlng 



8O0 a mile 

practical miles, loaded & empty. 
That's at least 83c for HHGI 



HQ. NE. NYC or Canada 
• NJ2 Loading/Unloading • NQ Escrow 



•Weekly Settlements 
|*Free Permits 
•Layover Pay 



•Fre« Bss«;p*sts/Permlti 
•Free Fu«f Card ■ F 



* Company Drivers* 
Paid Actual Routed NMes, Not HHQMHbiI 



SSSSffit 800-848-0405 

TRUCK UNES, INC. ** vv ¥1V w ^ y 




Graphic Artist 

WANTED 

We are looking for a Graphic Designer to 
join our Advertising Services Department. 

Full or Part time hours considered. 

Candidate must know QuarkXPress and 

possess adequate typing skills. Knowledge 

of paste-up is helpful, although we will train 

on this and other aspects of the job. 

Please forward resume to: 



Lakeland Publishers 
Attn: Ad Services 

Supervisor 
30 S. Whitney St. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 





SEASONAL DRIVER 



needed to run pick-up routes 3-6 days per 

week in Lake County immediately until the end 

of September. Mosquito light trap catches are 

picked up in the morning and driven to Roselle 

lab for specimen counting. Must be 18 years' 

of age or older and have good driving record. 

$7.25 per hour plus car allowance of $15 per 

day and $0.1 per job mile. 

For information, call Kara ©Clarke 

Environmental Mosquito Management 

800-942-2555. 



i 1. 



»■<- • ■ -l. Jk i 



,4#*.'UV<&'^ ^..V-"'. 



i -- » « ■ * r^A< 



August 13, 1999 



BACK TO SCHOOL 



Lakeland Newspapers 



/E1 




-«i wjt^ a**^ las?* '•'■ ' : • ' 






- 



Send vour cIiiklrcMi hack lo school 
Willi ite help of this special sc-clion 



Jicck inside lor useful lips and local bargains 



■ 

■ I 



E2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



BACK TO SCHOOL 



August 13 1 1999 



; 






Education begins before 
children enter school 



In this back-to-school issue Lakeland 
Newspapers is collaborating with the 
Child Care Coalition of Lake County to 
remind parents that quality child care 
and education must begin at birth. Starting in 
the earliest months a child's experiences act on 
the brain to form connections that are the 
foundation of learning. 

Lakeland Newspapers has been a key part- 
ner of the Coalition in helping families under- 
stand that children need high quality care be- 
ginning in infancy. Lakeland Newspapers in- 
cluded the first "Good Beginnings" section in 
1992, three years after a group of health, wel- 
fare, education and business professionals 
founded the Coalition to raise the quality of 
early childhood care and education in Lake 
County. 

Lake County families seeking child care 
can choose from settings including another 
family's home, the child's own home and a day 
care center. Another family's home that has 



been licensed by the State of Illinois is often a 
good choice for an infant or toddler, while a 
center (also state-licensed) might be the pref- 
erence for a four-year-old getting ready for 
kindergarten. Having a caregiver come to their 
home is an option if a family (1) checks refer- 
ences carefully and plans a method of moni- 
toring the care and (2) can afford the typically 
higher cost of this service. 

Educational methods vary, too. For exam- 
ple a center or home with a "developmental" 
approach sets up an environment of self-cor- 
recting, manipulative materials designed to al- 
low children to choose activities that they will 
succeed in doing. 

YWCA Child Care Resource and Referral of 
Lake County can help parents recognize, seek 
and find quality care. Call the YWCAR&R at 
782-2381 for names of caregivers and pro- 
grams and for guidelines to use when investi- 
gating child care options. — By Carol Bnisslan, 
M.ED., Family Network. 



Coalition to bring T. Berry 
Brazelton, M.D. to Lake 



< 





Trinity Lutheran Youth Services 

Little Lambs Preschool 

Now accepting applications for Fall of 1999 
A Christian atmosphere designed specifically for your .*. 4 & 5 year olds 

• Morning 3 Year Old - 2 Day Program • Morning & Afternoon 4 Year Olds - 3 Day Program 

• Afternoon Pre-K Program (5 Vr Olds) * -i Day Program 

• Ask About Our Dance Class-Tap & Ballet Sessions 

and 




As part of its 10th anniver- 
sary celebration the Child 
Care Coalition of Lake County 
will bring T. Berry Brazelton, 
M.D., renowned pediatrician, 
to speak to local families on 
Thursday, December 9, at 7 
p.m. at Finch University of 
Health Sciences/The Chicago 
Medical School in North 
Chicago. 

"Bringing Dr. Brazelton to 
Lake County highlights one of 
the Coalition's original goals 
— to educate parents so that 
they can raise their children 
with confidence and can rec- 
ognize and seek quality child 
care," said Sandra Raizes, 
Coalition president. 

For more than three 
decades parents and profes- 
sionals have turned to Dr. 
Brazelton for advice on child- 
care and development issues. 
Long recognized as one of the 
leaders in the field of clinical 
pediatrics, he has shared his 
research findings and practi- 
cal knowledge through his 
books, articles, magazine 
columns and cable television 
series. 

Dr. Brazelton has cham- 
pioned the notion that parents need to 
trust their own judgement by observing 
their children and following their intu- 
ition. His 15 books Include the classic, "In- 
fants and Mothers", which has been trans- 
lated into 16 languages, and "Working and 
Caring", offering advice for working par- 
ents. 

Admission to the lecture is only $10 a 
person because the event has been under- 




c 
e 

t 
C 

t 
t 
c 
c 

I 



T. Berry Brazelton, M.D. will answer questions from 
the audience when he speaks Thursday evening, De- 
cember 9, at Finch University of Health Sciences/The 
Chicago Medical School. 



written by the Child Care Coalition of Lake 
County's Quality Project funded by a state 
grant initiated by Senator Terry Link. Co- 
sponsors of the lecture are Finch Universi- 
ty and Baxter Healthcare. 

The registration deadline is December 
1. Reservations with a check made out to 
the Child Care Coalition of Lake County 
can be mailed to P.O. Box 1252, Highland 
Park, IL 60035. For more information call 
the Coalition at 604-4405. 




YWCA 



YWCA of Lake County 

2133 Belvidere Road 

Waukegan, Illinois 60085 

(847)662-4247 




Child Care Resources & Referral of Lake County 

Do You Need Child Care? Do You Need Help Paying For Child Care? 
Would You Like to Become A Child Care Provider? 

Child Care Resource & Referral Offers: 



For Parents: 

• Referrals from our extensive database of over 600 Child Care Providers. 

• Counseling on how to find affordable, quality child care. 

• Child Care Subsidy Program: We help determine eligibility and process 
applications for parents needing help paying for child care. 

• Parenting information and workshops. 

• Quarterly Child Care Newsletter. 



For Employers: 

• The expertise to set up customized child care plans to meet the needs of 
employers. 

• Training on how to become an informed child care consumer. 



For Child Care Providers: 

• Provides assistance on how to start and operate a child care business. 

• Mentoring for new providers. 

• A Nurse-Consultant to assist with health and safety concents. 

• Training for new and seasoned child care providers on a variety of topics, usually bilingual. 

• Referrals to parents looking for child care. 

• Child Care News, a quarterly newsletter. 

• Equipment/Resource library with toys, videos, and lots more. 



For the Community: 



1 



Speaker's Bureau addresses issues of child care, families, and children. 
Statistics on child care and issues concerning children. 
Advocate on children and, child care issues. 



WE ARE THE SOURCE FOR ALL YOUR CHILD CARE 



Foi more information 




662-4247 



■#« V *J»<*» -**■**• --** "**i+< 



,»....»»- 



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.* '-a; 



August 13, 1999 



BACK TO SCHOOL 



Lakeland Newspapers/ E3; 





child care providers 



Veronica Perry is one of 12 
child care providers taking cours- 
es at the College of Lake County 
thanks to scholarships' from the 
Child Care Coalition, the Coali- 
tion now is accepting applica- 
tions for more scholarships for 
child care providers in state-li- 
censed centers and homes in 
Lake County, 



The Child Care Coalition of 
Lake County Is a sponsoring part- 
ner in the T.E.A.C.H Early Child- 
hood Illinois Scholarship and 
Compensation Project, which is 
the major funder of the scholar- 
ships. 

Perry is a child care special- 
ist in the Women and Children's 
Program of NICASA (Northern 



Illinois Council and Alcoholism 
and Substance Abuse) in North 
Chicago. She plans to earn her 
associate degree by the end of 
2000 and, ultimately, operate 
her own child care and educa- 
tion center. 

For more information on ap- 
plying for scholarships, call 604- 
4405. 






prepare 




children 




Whether or not our children 
are actually starting school, Sep- 
tember always evokes poignant 
memories of the anticipation, 
anxiety and excitement we all 
have felt at this time of "begin- 
nings." Even infants and tod- 
dlers begin new classes, join new 
play groups and meet new care- 
givers. 

For many preschoolers a real 
visit to the school and teachers 
is the best first step. But after 
that visit the story and pictures 
in a book can provide an oppor- 
tunity for parent and child to re- 
flect on feelings and to explore 
similarities and differences be- 
tween the book and real life. 

Willy Bear by Mildred 
Kantrowitz is a short, simple, 
tender story about a little boy 
and his teddy bear on the night 
before and the morning of the 
first day of school. This is one of 



those special books that sends a 
message to us parents as we 
struggle with our ambivalence 
about holding onto and letting 
go of our children. 

Will I Have a Friend? by Miri- . 
am Cohen follows Jim to school ". 
on the first day while he won- 
ders whether he ever will be 
"one of the gang." The author 
depicts in a humorous way the 
activities of a preschool program 
and shows Jim is able to find a 
friend and feel comfortable in 
school. 

Other books that offer realistic 
and reassuring depictions of the 
activities of nursing school or 
kindergarten are My Nursery 
Schoolby Harlow Rockwell, First 
Day of Schoolby Helen Oxen- 
bury and Starting Schoolby 
Muriel Stanek. 

By Terry Beam, M.Ed., program 
Coordinator, Family Network. 



Families invited to Violence 
Prevention forum 



Veronica Perry is shown with participants In NtCASA'S summer program. — Carol Bruss/an photo 



"In My Shoes," a presentation 
by gun shot victims sponsored by 
Schwab Rehabilitation hospital, 
will one of the events at the Vio- 
lence Prevention forum Thursday, 
October 14, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 
the College of Lake County.. . 

Lake County Unites for VIP 



(Violence Intervention and Pre- 
vention) is sponsoring the day- 
long seminar for parents, chil- 
dren and educators as part of its 
coun tywide collaborative effort to 
build non-violent communities! 
Call 604-1504 for more informa- 
tion. 



m 



^ 



w 



s \er Now 




-v.... 



^opFalll The 

Afterschool 
Club 

Serving all 
of Lake County! 




f 



Safe, reliable before and after school care in 

Beach Park, Diamond Lake, Grayslake, Lake Villa, Libertyvilte, 

Vernon Hills, Spring Grove, 

Highland Park, Lake Bluff and Oak Grove. 

• More than child care! We offer recreational and enrichment 
activities that challenge and delight. 

• Open 5 days a week, 6 a.m. until 6 p.m. in most 
districts - even on school holidays. 

• Kindergarten enrichment program available. 

• Reasonable fees. _ 

• Providing dependable before and after school care since lysb. 

For more information, call (847) 548-2445 today! 

Registration is limited, so don't cf e lay / ; 



Now accepting registration for FALL! 

(limited spaces available) 





Full day child care for 2-5 year olds. 

Monday through Friday 

6:30 am - 6 pm 

706 E. Hawley, Mundelein 

(847) 949-0060 

part of the Lake County Family YMCA 

YCHIIB CARE 

We build strong kids, strong families, strong communities. 



ELECTRIC, 
APP] 

Learn to becoine an :EIe< 

Technician in t& 
[APPLIGATIdi 






[CATION 

JLE 
construction field 

fcatibn\field. 
ILEAT: 




J 



LIBERTYVILLE, IL 60048 

ACCEPTING ^PLICATIONS THRU DECEMBER 28, 1999 
FOR\THE JUNE, 2000 PROGRAM. 
TUESDAYS FROl 

8:00am • 12:00pi 

and 
1:00pm - 4:00pi 
Except the second Tuesday of leach month from 



' 



«00am 



ai 



Applicants will be afforded ebu^oppQrtuniti without regard to race, creed, 

color, sex, or national origm^p^catioW must be filled out in person. 

Call for furtn^^pts: 847-566-2200 



B^HUHi 




I 



-. 



E4/ Lakeland Newspapers 



KIDS 



. ,** .»-..,__ 



**».-* ■*■* * 




How much do you know 
about music? Test your knowledge 
by taking the quiz below. Circle 
the answers that you think are cor- 
rect, 

1. This instrument Is In the 
lute family. 

a. Guitar 

b. Mandolin 

c. Zither 

d. All of the above 



2. This Is another name for a plectrum. 

a. Pick 

b. Cymbal 

c. Tambourine 

d. Guitar suing 

3. This artist's Grammy nomination for 
best producer was the first ever for a 
woman. 

a. Shawn Colvin 

b. Madonna 

c. Paula Cole 

d. Sarah McLachlan 

4. This type of popular music combines 
features of rock 'n' roll and country mu- 
sic 

a Jazz 

b. Rockabilly 

c. Blues 

d. Rock opera 

5. This Is the speed at which music Is or 
should be played. 




Music 
Quiz 



a. Tempo 

b. Rhythm 

c. Treble 

d. Measure 

6. The xylophone Is this type of Instru- 
ment 

a. Wind 

b. Brass 

c. Percussion 

d. String 

7. This Is die range between soprano 
and tenor. 

a. Aria 

b. Bass 

c. Baritone 

d. Alto 

8. This person Is not considered to be 
one of the "Three Tenors." 

a. Luciano Pavarotti 

b. Placido Domingo 

c. Jos£ Carreras 
d.Yo-YoMa 

9. A full concert grand piano Is this long. 

a. G feet 

b. 7 feet 3 inches 




c. 8 feet 10 Inches 

d. 9 feet 

10. This Is a song of praise 
or thanksgiving to a deity. 

a. Hymn 

b. Ballad 

c. Alma mater 

d. Refrain 



11. Motown Record Company, 
which was founded In 1 959, 
was named after this city. 

a. Minneapolis 

b. Detroit 

c. Los Angeles 

d. Moscow 



August 13, 1999 







[ 



:j 



SPORTS FACT: 



THE LARGEST NFL STADIUM IS THE PONTIAC 

SILVERDOME, HOME OF THE DETROIT LIONS. 

IT SEATS 80,368 PEOPLE. 



How they say it in .. 





English: 

Spanish:. 

Italian: 

French: 

German: 

Latin: 



TWENTY 

VEINTE- 

VENTI 

VINGT 

ZWANZIG 

VIGINTI 




•; : 



• ON JAN. 10, LONDON'S METROPOLITAN RAIL- 
WAY, THE WORLD'S FIRST UNDERGROUND TRAIN 
SERVICE, OPENED. 

• U.S. PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN DELIVERED 
THE GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, DEDICATING A NA- 
TIONAL CEMETERY ON THE BATTLEFIELD AT 
GETTYSBURG, ON NOV. 19. 

• IN THIS YEAR, THE FIRST MODERN WEATHER 
MAPS WERE PUBLISHED. 




The Grayslake Community Park District is committed to enhancing the quality of life 

in the Grayslake community by providing year-round leisure services, 

preserving open space and fostering community pride. 

Come join us this fall in one of our many programs and special events 



• Parent & Tot Classes 

• Dance 

• Soccer 

• Karate 

• Trips 

• Breakfast with Santa 

• Golf Lessons 

• Senior Events 

• Fitness 

• Cooking Classes 



• Early Childhood Classes 

• Basketball 

• Gymnastics 

• Adult Variety Classes 

• Ghost Walk 

• Tennis ' 

• Youth Sports 

• Teen Trips 

• Special Events 

• Adult Basketball & 
Volleyball Leagues 



Grayslake Community Park District 

151 Hawley St. 

Grayslake^IL 60030 

(847) 223-7529 



We have a wide selection of programs for all age groups 

* ' ■ ■ * 

.Stop by and pick up your fall brochure today. 
Registration for all fall programs, begins August 9th! 

* i ■ * • 

■ i , 

Celebrating 40 years of fun! 
. 1959-1999 ' • 



& 



' 



I 



* ., ■* " 









. . . * — - - 



. * r — — * 






79th An 




PULL-OUT SECTION 







<t 










KIJ-I 



Free 
Parking 

Free 
Grandstand 



Milwaukee 




Wilmot Speedway 

Ls just 20 Minutes West 

of £94 on County C (Ext M5) 



Chicago 





18-22 




Daily admission 
12 years of age & over 

Adults .$6.00 

Sr. Citizens 5.00 

Sr. Citizens Day... 4.00 
Ages 8-11 ......3.00 

7 & Under ....FREE 



The Admission Fee is non-refundable. 

All entertainment is free with paid 
admission. No refunds for cancellation I 

of any free scheduled entertainment 1 
due to unforeseen circumstances. \ 



& 



■a I ? ,t.?y, 



m m 

'.l __ 



*:W 



KENOSHA Southside 3 

bedroom 2 story brick with 
3-season porch, fireplace, 
cat-in countr)* kitchen, new 
carpeting, remodeled bath, 
formal dining room, fenced 
yard, tool shed ft cabana. 
Why rent if you can 0*11? 
$&9,900(1NM18) 





KENOSHA Immaculate 2 
BR ranch across from 
Curtis Strange Elementary. 
Eat-in kitchen, beamed / 
cathedral ceilings In L.R. 
Fenced yard, garden shed, 
and 1.5 car garage. Brand 
new roof. Newer furnace. 
$87,500 (IM-3&6) 



KENOSHA Soatbsidc 3 
bedroom bungalow has 
fenced backyard w/deck. 
KW floors in LR&DR, lots 
of cupboards in decorated 
kitchen. Great house for 
the money. Free 13 month 
home warranty coverage. 
Sg4,900(lM^13) 



KENOSHA Nortbsidc 3 
BR has brand new kitchen, 
carpeting, turcace, 2.5 Ion 
A/C, new therm© pane 
windows, Backyd has new 
concrete patio. Updated 
bathroom, french doors 
leading to LR/DR combo. 
594,900 (I M-139) 






KENOSHA Soatbsidc 
Incredibally immaculate 3 
BR Bungalow. New bcrbcr 
carpet, refinished hard- 
wood floors in foyer ft 
DN, open staircase. 3 
decorated DRs, front porch, 
nice landscaped backyard. 
589.900 (I M-429) 



KENOSHA Sootfcslde 
Very nice ft freshly painted 
3 BR CapeCod with fully 
finished RecRoom, dry bar, 
ft gas fireplace. Newer 
mechanicals, deck, fenced 
yard. 1,145 SF, 2 car 
garage, aluminum sided 
595,000 (1M-441) 



KENOSHA Northaidc 
Quality built ranch on 
corner lot 3BRs, cat-in 
kitchen w/oak cabinets, re- 
modeled bath. RecRoom ft 
bath In basement. A/C, 2.5 
car garage, appliances ft 
Home Warranty included. 
Slt9£00(IM440) 





KENOSHA'S LARGEST & OLDEST DISCOUNT REAL ESTATE AGENCY 





MONTH 



REALTY 



WE SPECIALIZE IN BUYER REPRESENTATION 

* Find out about low interest loans 

* Low down payments & low monthly payments 

* FREE computer list of every home available in your price range 
andinlocationsofyourchoice f| DlSOOUntfateS 

* Did you know we can show you ANY property in Wisconsin listed 

byANY real estate company? 



* 



We 
Save You 
MORE!!! 



Ron & Diana Dahlberg 

. Broker/Owmr/ABR 
"Kenosba's Real Estate Mors 




Become a PREFERRED BUYER TODAY!!! 414 657-fl71 

-HOUR HOTLINE (414) 657-0866 





iC. 



11. ., ■, 



E4> 'Lakeland Newspapers 



KIDS KORNER 



. , . - . . 



-..., - »*• ntiM^*rtKnnn 



il«gU5f 23,2999 



How much do you know 
about music? Test your knowledge 
by taking the quiz below. Circle 
the answers that you think ore cor- 
rect. 

1. Hils Instrument Is In the 
lute family. 

a. Guitar 

b. Mandolin 

c. Zither 

d. All of the above 



2. This Is another name for a plectrum. 

a. Pick 

b. Cymbal 

c. Tambourine 

d. Guitar string 

3. This artist's Grammy nomination for 
best producer was the first ever for a 
woman. 

a. Shawn Colvin 

b. Madonna 

c. Paula Cole 

d. Sarah McLachlan 

4. This type of popular music combines 
features of rock 'n' roll and country mu- 
sic 

a. Jazz 

b. Rockabilly 

c. Blues 

d. Rock opera 

5. This Is the speed at which music Is or 
should be played. 




Music 
Quiz 




a. Tempo 

b. Rhythm 

c. Treble 

d. Measure 

6. The xylophone Is this type of instru- 
ment 

a. Wind 

b. Brass 

c. Percussion 

d. String 

7. This Is the range between soprano 
and tenor. 

a. Aria 

b. Bass 

c. Baritone 
d.Alto 

8. This person Is not considered to be 
one of the "Three Tenors." 

a. Luciano PavarotU 

b. Piacido Domingo 

c. Jos£ Carreras 
d.Yo-YoMa 

9. A full concert grand piano Is this long. 

a. 6 feet 

b. 7 feet 3 inches 



c. 8 feet 10 inches 

d. 9 feet 

10. This Is a song of praise 
or thanksgiving to a deity. 

a. Hymn 

b. Ballad 

c. Alma mater 

d. Refrain 



11. Motown Record Company, 
which was founded In 1959, 
was named after this city. 

a. Minneapolis 

b. Detroit 
c.Los Angeles 
d. Moscow 




'■ 



• 






SPORTS FACT: 



THE LARGEST NFL STADIUM IS THE PONTIAC 

SILVERDOME, HOME OF THE DETROIT UONS. 

IT SEATS 80,368 PEOPLE. 





FAU INTO FUN 

WITH THE 

QRAVSLAKE PARK 



How they say it in .. 




English: 


TWENTY 


Spanish: 


VEINTE- 


Italian: 


VENTI 


French: 


VINGT 


German: 


ZWANZIG 


Latin: 


VIGINTT 




• ON JAN. 10, LONDON'S METROPOLITAN RAIL- 
WAY, THE WORLD'S FIRST UNDERGROUND TRAIN 
SERVICE, OPENED. 

• U.S. PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN DELIVERED 
THE GETTYSBURG ADDRESS, DEDICATING A NA- 
TIONAL CEMETERY ON THE BATTLEFIELD AT 
GETTYSBURG, ON NOV. 19. 

• IN THIS YEAR, THE FIRST MODERN WEATHER 
MAPS WERE PUBLISHED. 






The Grayslake Community Park District is committed' to enhancing the quality of life 

in the Grayslake community by providing year-round leisure services, 

preserving open space and fostering community pride. 

Come join us this fall in one of our many programs and special events 



=^3* 



• Parent & Tot Classes 

• Dance 

• Soccer 

• Karate 

• Trips 

• Breakfast with Santa 

• Golf Lessons 

• Senior Events 

• Fitness 

• Cooking Classes 



• Early Childhood Classes 

• Basketball 

• Gymnastics 

• Adult Variety Classes 

• Ghost Walk 

• Tennis 

• Youth Sports 

• Teen Trips 

• Special Events 

• Adult Basketball & 
Volleyball Leagues 



Grayslake Community Park District 

lSlHawleySt. 

Grayslake, IL 60030 

(847) 223-7529 



We have a wide selection of programs for all age groups 

Stop by and pick up your fall brochure today. 
Registration for all fall programs, begins August 9th! 

Celebrating. 40 years of fun! 
1959-1999 









i . i. i . ■' , ;! i "»;^>*— ■ ■'"■ '■ " ■; ,, " ...- ,."i ' --V . 'f . ' i 1 ■ 



i/a 



1 






Wisconsin 



Free 
Parking 

Free 
Grandstand 



mi.. n l'"**". 



Milwaukee 




Wilmot Speedway 

b Just 20 Mtmiles West 

of 1-94 on County C (Ext 345) 



Chicago 





August 



Daily admission 
12 years of age & over 

Adults $6.00 

Sr. Citizens 5.00 

Sr. Citizens Day... 4.00 
Ages 8-11 ......3.00 

7 & Under '.'. ! . .FREE 

The Admission Fee is non-refundable. 

All entertainment is free with paid 
admission. No refunds for cancellation 
of any free scheduled entertainment 
due to unforeseen circumstances. 



1 





KENOSHA Southside 3 
bedroom 2 story brick with 
3-season porch, fireplace 
eat-in country kitchen, new 
carpeting, remodeled bath, 
formal dining room, fenced 
yard, tool shed & cabana- 
Why rent if you can own? 
$89,90Q<IM-4|8) 



KENOSHA Immaculate 2 
BR ranch across from 
Curtis Strange Elementary. 
Ear-in kitchen, beamed / 
cathedral ceilings In LR. 
Fenced yard, garden shed, 
and 1.5 car garage. Brand 
new roof Newer furnace, 
S87£00 (IM-J86) 



KENOSHA Soatbsidc 3 

bedroom bungalow has 
fenced backyard Wdcck, 
HW floors in LR&DH, lots 
of cupboards in decorated 
kitchen. Great house for 
the money. Free 13 month 
home warranty coverage. 
$84,900 (I M4 13) 



KENOSHA Nonbside .3 
BR has brand new kitchen, 
carpeting, furcacc, 2.5 ton 
A/C, new thetmo pane 
windows, Backyd has new 
concrete patio. Updated 
bathroom, french doors 
leading to LR/DR combo. 
$94,900 (IM-439) 









I 



KENOSHA SoatbsJde 
Incredibally immaculate 3 
BR Bungalow. New bcrber 
carpet. refinUhed hard- 
wood floors in foyer & 
DN, open staircase. 3 
decorated BRs, front porch, 
nice landscaped backyard. 
$89,900 (I M-429) 




KENOSHA Soatfuldc 
Very nice & freshly painted 
3 BR CapeCod wlih fully 
finished RecRoom, dry bar, 
& gas fireplace. Newer 
mechanicals, deck, fenced 
yud. 1,145 SF. 2 car 
garage, aluminum sided. 
$95,000 (IM-441) 



KENOSHA Northsidc 
Quality built ranch on 
comer lot. 3BRs, cM-in 
kitchen w/oak cabinets, re- 
modeled bath. RecRoom & 
bath in basement A/C, 2.5 
car garage, appliances & 
Home Warranty included. 
$109,900 (I KM40) 



KENOSHA'S LARGEST & OLDEST DISCOUNT REAL ESTATE AGENCY 





MONTH 



REALTY 



WE SPECIALIZE IN BUYER REPRESENTATION 

* Find out about low interest loans 

* Low down payments & low monthly payments 

* FREE computer list of every home available in your price range 
andinlocationsofyourchoice DtSCOUIlt IblBS 

* Did you know we can show you ANY property in Wisconsin listed 
by ANY real estate company? 




Mi 



I 




Wc 
Save You 
MORE!!! 



Ron & Diana Dahlberg 

Broker/Owner/ABR 
"fowtsba's Real Estate Sellers 




Become a PREFERRED BVYER TODAY!" «t 

24-HOUR HOTLINE (414) 657-0866 



657-1171 



F2/ Lakeland Newspapers 



KENOSHA COUNTY FAIR 



Kenosha County Fair Schedule 



August 13, 1999 



j 



■ I 



Wednesday, August 18 

Senior Citizen's Day, 
Seniors $4 all day 



9 a.m. 
9 a.m. 



9 a.m. 
9 a.m. 

9 a.m. 

10 a.m. 
1-8 p.m. 



Judging of Open Class Swine 
Judging of Open Class Clothing, 
Knitting & Crocheting and 
Home Furnishings 
Judging of Open Class Flowers 
Judging of Open Class Plants 
Judging Open Class Photography 
Judging Junior Fair Swine 
Judging of 4-H Projects 
Animal and Veterinary Science 
Plant and Soil Science 
Flowers and House Plants 
Natural Science 
Cultural Arts 
Food and Nutrition 
Knitting and Crocheting 
Home Environment 
Family Living 
Child Development 
Table Tops 
Youth Leadership 
Health, Social and Political Science 
Judging of Open Class Sheep 
Judging of Junior Fair Sheep 
Judging of Junior Fair Calves 
4-H Dog Show (watertight area) 
4-H Cat Show (poutry area) 
Midway Wrist Band Promotions 
Good on mechanical Rides 
Talent Show Part 1 
Crowning of the Fairest of the Fair 
Tractor Pull 



Judging of Open Class Beef 

follows Jr. Show 
9:30 a.m. Judging of Open Class Cultural Arts 
1-6 p.m. Midway Wrist Band Promotion 

2 p.m. i Judging of Junior Fair 

Poultry Showmanship 

3 p.m, Judging of Open Class Poultry 
6 p.m. Judging of Special Exhibit- 
Miniature of Country Living 

6 p.m. Talent Show Part 2 (free acts stage) 

7:30 p.m. Starship, followed by Kansas 

(Grandstand) 
Also: 

Chain Saw Artist 

Korky the Clown Prince of Magic 

Petting Zoo 

American Garden 



Friday, August 20 



Children's Day 



3 p.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 
4:30 p.m. 
6 p.m. 
4-9 p.m. 

6 p.m. 

9 p.m. 

Truck and 

Combine Demolition Derby 

Also: Chain Saw Artist 

Korky the Clown Prince of Magic 
Petting Zoo 
American Garden 



Thursday, August 19 

8 a.m. Judging of Junior Fair Poultry 

9 a.m. Judging of Open Class Foods 

1 a.m. Judging of Junior Fair Beef Cattle 



8 a.m. 

8 a.m. 



9 a.m. 



10:30 a.m. 



1 1 a.m. 



1 p.m. 

1 p.m. 

6 p.m. 

6:30 p.m. 

7 p.m. 

7:30 p.m. 
10 a.m - 
6 p.m. 



Junior Fair Horse Show 

Judging of Junior Fair Rabbits 

Judging of Open Class 

Rabbits follows Jr. Show 

Judging of Junior Fair Dairy Cattle 

Judging of Open Class Dairy 

Cattle follows Jr. Dairy Show 

Children's Parade 

(at the SE corner of the grounds) 

Judging of Junior Fair Goats 

Judging of Open Class 

Goats follows Jr. Goats 

Judging of Open Class 

Flower Arrangements 

Pedal Tractor Pull (watertight area) 

4-H Fish Casting Contest 

(at Fish Ponds) 

Hay Bale Throwing Contest 

Crowning of Uttle Miss Princess 

(free acts stage) 

Arron Tippon (grandstand) 

Special Kiddies Matinees 

on the Midway 

Reduced prices on most rides 



Lumberjack Show 
Also: 

Chain Saw Artist 

Korky the Clown Prince of Magic 

Petting Zoo 

American Garden 



Saturday, August 21 

8 a.m. 4-H Horse Show 

10 a.m. Garden Tractor Pull (grandstand) 

1 p.m. Junior Fair Livestock Sale 

1 p.m. Big Hat Rodeo 

2 p.m. Pedal Tractor Pull (watertight area) 

register at 1 p.m. 
7 p.m. Class of '62 Band (free acts stage) 

7 p.m. Big Hat Rodeo 

8 p.m. Pie Auction 
Lumberjack Show 

A,so: Chain Saw Artist 

Korky the Clown Prince of Magic 
Petting Zoo 
. American Garden 
Antique Display 



Sunday, August 22 

1 p.m. Battle of the Bands 

1:30 p.m. 4-H Poultry and Rabbit Sale , 

1 :30 p.m. Horseshoe Pitching Contest 

2:30 p.m. Demo Derby (grandstand), 

6 p.m. Open Square Dance,. Ted Palment 

6 p.m. Demo Derby (grandstand) 

Lumberjack Show 

Also: 

Chain Saw Artist 

Korky the Clown Prince of Magic 

Petting Zoo 

American Garden 

Antique Display 



No pets allowed on the grounds. 

For more information/call 414-862-6121. 




1999 Kenosha Co. 
4-H / Youth 



I 



552 Main Si. (al Ri. 83 & North Are.) • Anilotil 
(847) 838-5334 

Moving to 378 Lake St. s 

(next to Antioch Movie Theatre) 
As of September 1 

Moving Sale 

Now in Progress 



Cigar Cutters 

Pipe & Pipe Tobacco 

Clove Cigarettes 
Desktop Humidors 

Cigar Ash Trays 
Pocket Humidors 

Magazines 



Livestock Sale 

Sat. August 21 

1p.m. 



Pie Auction 

Sat. August 21 

8 p.m. 



Small Animal Sale 

Sun. August 22 

1:30 p.m. 




pte 




Since 1959 

Marine • Lawn & Garden • Snowmobile 



WE KNOW ENGINES. 
WE STOCK THE PARTS! 

Service For Most Brands. 



Opon Daily Till 7 p.m o47"u07"£ 1 UZ 

Valorizing b Storage ^ N p^^ ^ R(J 

- g Fox Lake, IL Q Wg 

1 Block West & 1>2 Blocks North of Rt. 12 & Grand Ave. 




Tractors Start At $1399 
Snow Blower Service 




LAWN AND 

GROUNDS CARE EQUIPMENT 



Helpful People • quality Product* • Outstanding Service Sine* 1923 

From Lawn Mowers... 






JDLT1J3 1» hp. [$60 2t 

JB" Mower MOWER 

...To Lawn Makers. 

At Schmidt Implement - we have equipment for 

lawns and job* of any size - with 75 years (^experience 

to help you out and back you up. See ui today Tor all your equipment needs 

a"l| VllAJ MMPtaHENT 
BJyimiqmpajiYi 

OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE SINCE 1923 

Hwy. 83, 5 Miles North of Antioch 
SALEM, Wl • 414-843-2326 







even though we're still stocking the shelyes! 
Stop in and see what we have to offer in • 

HO & N GAUGE TRAINS BALSAWOOD 

HO RACE CARS MODEL PAINTS & TOOLS 

MODEL ROCKETS, BOATS SCIENTIFIC 

& AIRPLANES MAGAZINES. 



v,i»-.:**»WW+>- ^'tvjieWKaiMUl ■■*•**' 



ID400 SEBIES 

Compict Traders 
Mow, Load, Dig 1 much mora! 

HOURS Men. - Sat. 8-5 




'Your family Hobby Center 

. 2048 E. GRAND AVE. 

Lindenhurst 
located in 

35&0500 



...:.-■ 



"- .: " ' 



~1 1(V8 



,;:-■■ 



MP- 



SAT. 9-5 



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-^i-^.Aw-<«t*^yi »^ i^ <fi Jl^i^WM 



August 13, 1999 







KENOSHA COUNTY FAIR 



Lakeland Newspapers/ F3 






Kenosha County 
Fairgrounds Key 



A. 
B. 
C. 
D. 
E. 
F. 
G. 
H. 



Fair Adrhinlstratron Office' 

Commercial Building 

4-H Exhibits Building * 

Storage 

Exhibition Building 

School Exhibit Building' 

Poultry Barn 

Cattle, Swine, Sheep, and 

Horse Barn : 

Grandstand Area 

Free Acts Stage 

Horseshow Ring 

Exhibit Building 

Livestock Show and Sale 

Building 

Washroom Facilities 

Salem Methodist Church 

Uon's Club 

4-H Building 

Uon's Club 

Farm Bureau Women's 

Fair Police and Rescue 

Squad Bldg. 

Knights of Columbus 
V. > Knights of Columbus: 
W. Church of Latter Day 

Saints 

Main Ticket Gate 

Midway Rides 

Rabbit Barns 
AA. Beer Tent 
BB. Antique Machinery 



I. 

J. 

K. 

L 

M. 

N. 
O. 
P. 
Q. 
R. 
S. 
T. 

U. 



X. 
Y. 
Z. 




PARKING 




53 m n 

'odeh fl ml 



N 



W 



B 



[9 



LB 



2nd Annual 




Saturday - August 21 

See the Race Cars... 
Meet the Race Stars... 
of Wilmot Speedway. 

1 p.m. - 9 p.m. 




Corn Roast 
and Brats 




FREE BALLOONS FOR THE KIDS 




WIL.MOT SPEEDWAY; 



EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT 
0»'ii sell you a seat 

But you'll only need the edge* 



Corning August 28th 

After The County Fair Championships 
The IRA Sprint Car Invasion 



(m<M& 



life 1 !! see you at the Wing Ding 

st-ii ik.~ «..1l».r AlA-tmi-OAAIl nr Rd7.R1A.RinP 



Call Ihe racellrws 414-862-2446 or 847-838-RACE 

Easy to get to on the Kenosha County Fairgrounds 

1-94 to Kenosha County Hwy 'C*, exit 345 , go west 13 miles to the speedway 




£fe?4 @ 



Serfela (tort's 

Pub L Grill 

25855 West ROUte 173, AntioClvIL 60002 

FOR DETAILS CALL W-395-360 1 / 



Sponsored in part by 



PREMIER AUTO RACING 

847-395-0500 

BIG FUN DJ ENTERTAINMENT 

847-244-4363.. 



JIM'S BUDGET AUTO SALES 

847-395-5505 

BABICZ AUTO RACING SERVICES 

•847-855-0019 



Pub L Grill 

25855 West Route 173 - Channel Lake, IL 

Phone 8M7-315-8604 




5fc 



Four Seasons of Fun 





• Open Year- Round 
•7 Days A Week 

• Kitchen Open Weekends 
with Full BrcakTast 

and Sandwich Menu 

• Mini Galley Always Open 
feu hiring Homemade Chili, 
DBQ Pork Sandwiches, 
and Pizza . 



L 



BAR OPEn 

Daily u a.m. til t a.m. 
. Fridays till 2 a.m. 
Saturdays 5 a.m. tin 2 a.m. 
Sundays 5 a.m. till i a.m. 

KITCHEH OPER 

Friday s P.M. - s P.M. 

Saturday 6 A.M. - 3 P.M. 

Sunday 6 A.M. - 3 P.M. 



Pool, Darts, Pinball 

PRIVATE PARTY PACKAGES AVAILABLE 



> Large Screen TV 

■ Lighted Horseshoe Pits 

• Lighted Concrete Patio 

> Boat Launch Facilities 

> Docking Tor 24 Boats 

' Seasonal Slips Available 

> Ice Fishing & 
Snowmobile Parking 

• Large Lighted Parking Lot 



*— ~ ■ ■ ■*** »*»lI*iM^MI^i ^| » * ■# ■ i»»< 



■a— .»— .~- ..— -a.* *-»w*~ *►-•*• '*~—'+*4i*y~*% 



,.,.:•-'.• . _. i J 



.ITrrSBSBa 






F4 / Lakeland Newspapers 



KENOSHA COUNTY FAIR 



August 13, 1999 



< j 



oney Down 



A 



l 



Deere 



(Now All You Need Is Gas Money.) 



LT133 Lawn Tractor 

• 13 hp • 38-inch mower deck 

• 5-speed shift-on-the-go transmission 

• 15 & 16 hp automatic transmission 
models avaiiabie 



$ 



PER MOHW 



■J 

•i" : ■ ■ 



«K 



1438H Sabre® by John Deere 



74.5 hp • 38-inch mower deck 
Hydro/automatic transmission 



$ 



1,599 



«sS 



sas 



$63*^, - 



'^ . 



J^^ 



JX75 Walk-Behind Mower 

With Bagger 

• 6 hp engine 
• Five-speed self-propelled drive system 
• Overhead-valve design for faster starting 
and improved fuel efficiency 
Pressurized lubrication for longer engine life- 
Durable die-cast aluminum deck resists 

rust and dents 

• Handlebars fold easily for storage 

• Mower controls at your fingertips 
• Seven cutting heights 

*739 

s 60 OFF 






;■'■ 



-!■■' 






BH30 Hand-Held Blower 



id 



zjpi 



169 






33 cc • 180-mph air velocity 
• Weighs 10.7 pounds 

$<ii*a99* 






Au[ 

I 



yoi 
"II 
As 
dn 
ini 

no 



Walk in with an empty wallet and walk out with a John Deere. Buying 
lawn care equipment has never been easier. So see Dick's Marine for no money 
down* on your selection from a full line of lawn and garden equipment, before 
October 31, 1999. (You'll still have plenty of money left over to top off the tank.) 



JOHN DEERE 



Nothing Runs 
Like A Deere® 

http://www.deere.com. 



w 



s 



ft 



y ■ ' 



I I 



|i 



I ■ ' 



'ws_ 

ffifim 



'SALES 'SERVICE 

Delivering more than just great products. 

847-587-2102 _ 

32 N. Pistakee Lake Rd. • Fox Lake, IL • 1 block W & V/> blocks N of Rt. 12 and Grand Ave. 

Mon. - Sat. 8:30-7:00; Sun. 9:30-7:00 

'Offer ends October 31, 1999. Subject to approved credit on John Deere Credit Revolving Plan. For noncommercial use only. Taxes, freight, setup, and delivery charges 
could Increase monthly payment. Other special rates and terms may be available, Including installment financing and financing for commercial use. 



__ -™*__-.„ — »","?.;'V i — ■ — v — -_ — * 



.-.L. 



___ . — «».. t ,> **« 






BACK TO SCHOOL 



Lakeland Newspapers/ES 



Givec 




eme 




We all say it. "I like the way 
you're washing your hands" or 
"I like the picture you drew." 
As parents we want our chil- 
dren to know they are pleas- 
ing us. 

But early childhood experts 
now believe that there is a bet- 



ter strategy to make children 
feel good about themselves in 
ways that will serve them well 
throughout their lives. That 
technique has been labeled 
"descriptive encouragement," 
and it stands in sharp contrast 
to bestowing praise through 



the w I-like-lt rt approach. 

Using descriptive encour- 
agement, we would say, for ex- 
ample, "Rebecca, you're get- 
ting your hands very soapy, 
washing between your fingers, 
•/* tting the backs and fronts. 
1 hose are going to be clean 







hands." Rebecca now feels 
good about how she's perform- 
ing the task of hand-washing. 
She's developing self-esteem 
from competence, from know- 
ing "I can do it," rather than 
thinking she's pleasing the ex- 
pert... you. 

Praise implies that the adult 
Is the expert. Praise can even 
reduce motivation because a 
child may choose an easy, 
rather than a challenging, ac- 
tivity (such as selecting a jigsaw 
puzzle with fewer parts) so he 
Is sure that he'll win your 
praise. 

When you use descriptive 
encouragement, you free your 
child to make mistakes and to 
appreciate the task itself. You 
encourage your child to look 
more carefully at what he's do- 
ing and you create an environ- 
ment in which your child does 
not fear someone else's stan- 



dard of excellence. 

You can start descriptive en- 
couragement with very young 
children. You can describe how 
your baby is touching his 
hands together or smiling or 
you can tell your toddler, "I can 
see you're going across the 
room." 

Descriptive encouragement 
prevents children from becom- 
ing "praise junkies," looking for 
the outward reward. Descrip- 
tive encouragement can be the 
first step you take as a parent 
to help your child become a 
self-motivated learner and per- 
son who is able to make re- 
sponsible choices for him- 
self. — By Carol Brusslan, M.Ed, 
Family Network, adapted from 
a presentation by Carol Rutberg 
and Jennifer S. Brown at the 
workshop sponsored by Chicago 
Metro Association for the Edu- 
cation of Young Children. 



parent does not have to wait until this picture is finished to say, "I tike it." Comments can begin 
ith, "Oh, you are making a design across the bottom of your paper" and continue as this young 
artist progresses with her work. — Photo by Carol Brusslan at Family Network 




can get tax credit 



Families of all income levels 
are eligible for the Child and 
Dependent Care Credit 
(CADC). Any type of child care 
qualifies as long as families pay 
for the care. The amount of the 
tax credit depends upon family 
income, the number of children 
in care, and the amount paid 
for their care. 



The amount of credit is sub- 
tracted from the taxpayer's fed- 
eral tax liability to reduce the 
amount of tax actually owed. 

The federal CADC Income- 
tax credit is the single largest 
source of federal child care as- 
sistance. 

For further information call 
80Q-TAX.-1040. 






1 sc-Wi' 



I 




We offer a 
flexible schedule 
to fit around 
your 

if you're looking for a flexible schedule, comprehensive 
benefits and interesting assignments at top local 
companies, look to us. 

You'll work when you want.. .at assignments you'll like. 
Call us. 



O MANPOWER MANFOArHTOTECHNICAL 




Lake Villa 265-6300 
Vernon Hills 918-1200 
Lake Zurich 726-9300 
Waukegan 473-7100 

www.manpower31 0.com. 



Technical/Scientific/Professional 856-1 307 



Health Care 856-1 307 



•4- 






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E6 / Lakeland Newspapers 



BACK TO SCHOOL 



August 13, 1999 t\ 






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Coalition helps centers pay accreditation fees 



The Child Care Coalition of Lake 
County, through the Quality 
Project, is pleased to offer finan- 
cial and technical support to any 
child care center in Lake County interest- 
ed in becoming an accredited program. 



Accreditation from the National Acad- 
emy of Early Childhood Programs con- 
firms that a center is recognized national- 
ly for providing a high quality program 
that meets the physical, social, emotional 
and cognitive development of children. 




This preschooler is checking the bug chart at Tri-Con Child Care Center in High- 
land Park, which is beginning the accreditation process with help from Coalition 
board members Marilyn Straus and Elaine Matthews, directors emeritus of ac- 
credited programs. — Photo by Carol Brusslan. 



fflEIEARNNS RAINBOW ODI^DEVEWPMENT CENTER 




CHILD DEVELOPMENT 
CENTER 

A home away from home 
5400 Grand Avenue, Gurnee • 263-6319 

The Learning Rainbow offers: 

• A new facility 

• Openings for ages 6 wks to 5 years 

• Before and after school club 

• Certified and experienced staff 

• Indoor and outdoor playground 

• Parent education seminars and family support systems 

• Hi-tech security indoor and out 

• Open from 6:00 am to 6:00 pm 

• Active PTO 

• Two new rooms opening this summer 

• A Christian environment managed by The Living Well 
United Methodist Church 

• Voted #1 in the News Sun for being the best daycare 
center in Gurnee 

• A single priority for children 



Two directors from programs already 
accredited will serve as mentors to those 
centers going through accreditation for 
the first time. The team will make an on- 
site visit and will be available for consul- 
tation while the center is preparing for ac- 
creditation. 

The Coalition will pay two-thirds of 
fees required by the Academy for ac- 
creditation and also will fund the up- 



grading of equipment and materials and 
the training of staff when necessary. For 
centers already accredited the Coalition 
will cover two-thirds of the fees for re 
accreditation, which takes place every 
threeyears. 

Call Barbara Haley at 681-2278 for 
more Information— By Sandra Raizes, 
Child Care Coalition of Lake County Presi- 
dent. 



Biting can be frustrating and frightening 



One of the most emotionally charged 
issues with parents of young children is 
biting. Whether your child is the one 
who does the biting or has been bitten 
by another, it is frustrating and frighten- 
ing and causes stress and anxiety for all 
adults involved. 

Whether your toddler (between the 
ages of 12 and 36 months) attends a 
group care setting or is an at-home 
child, biting may occur as a develop- 
mental phase. Most children stop biting 
by the age of three. Many children never 
attempt to bite another person. 

For many children the pain of 
teething creates a need or desire to bite 
on something comforting. If you think 
this could be the case, offer your child a 
teething ring, a hard pretzel or a wet, 
chilled washcloth. 

Biting may also be an attention-get- 
ting device. The cry for attention is usu- 
ally at a time when you are preoccupied 
with another child, a task, or of course, 
when you're on the phone. Plan ahead 
by offering something interesting such 
as a small dish pan of bubbly water on 
top of a flannel-backed tablecloth or 
some cardboard books, wooden puzzles 
or toddler-sized legos. 



Frustration and anger are other rea- 
sons for biting. Children feel powerless 
when they lack adequate language 
skills. If your child isn't talking yet, 
watch closely for signs of non-verbal 
language that provide clues to how he's 
feeling. 

Finally, look at the environment 
your child is in during biting inci- 
dents. Is the environment calming or 
stimulating? Too many toys can be 
chaotic. 

Is there an absolute cure for biting? 
In a word, NO. Recent brain research 
tells us that various stages of develop- 
ment are related to brain stem func- 
tions. Experts say that in a child with an 
immature system," survival needs lead to 
behaviors such as fighting, pushing, 
kicking and biting. As the child matures 
and the cortex functions take over, he or 
she becomes a sociable human being (in 
most cases). 

A cautionary bit of advice: If you have 
a child older than three who is still do- 
ing a good deal of biting, check with 
your pediatrician or a mental health ex- 
pert. — By Charlene Ackerman, M.Ed., 
Executive Director Paul K. Kennedy 
Child Care Center. 




Academy 



Pending D.C.F.S. licensing 



Open House 



Dote: August 25, 1999 
Times: 10:00 AM-1:00 PM 
5:00 PM-7:00 PM 



ATTENTION 

MOMS & DADS! 

We Are The New 
Preschool in your Area. 

Our Motto Is 

"Where Learning Begins" 

We offer an age appropriate program 

that develops your child 

• EMOTIONAL * PHMSICALLy * INTELLECTUALLy 

in a loving and caring environment 

within a 

new state-of-the-art building 



ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR CHILDREN 2 1/2 - 5 YEARS OF AGE 

For more information please contact our director 

SHERI MEVERDEN 847/265-5664 
3065 Falling Waters Blvd. • Lindenhurst, IL 

Red Apple Academy is truly a now state-of-the-art facility, located in a 
new building in the Lindenhurst Business Park on Highway 45, approxi- 
mately one mile north of Grand Avenue. 




33 



We've hired only the most qualified staff. Our teach- 
ers arc not only involved in Early Learning Education but 
are very aware of what your child's needs arc. Our 
goal is to provide a preschool experience that will be ^Jl 
centered on the children, where they arc taught and nurtured in an J ( 
environment where they will feel loved, safe and accepted. 

./*■ . Our curriculum includes language arts, math rcadi- ^^ £* 

ft O ncss ' dramatic P* av » mu sic, fine motor development, large ^j 
"O-^tti motor development, science exploration, social/emotional ■ 
JJiC/ growth, open and creative arts and crafts, and guest speakers. 

Our director, Shcri Mcverden, has been involved in Early Learning 

Education for 15 years and served as director for a Gurnee preschool until 

the birth of her second child in April, 1998. Shcri 

jm and her husband, Ron, are Iho proud parents of 
Lindsay, age 4 and Jeffrey, age 1. 




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**.-w* - *«i ii ■ *'** 



August 13, 1999 



BACK TO SCHOOL 



Lakeland Newspapers/ E7 



What do chi 




chool? 



Dear Marilyn: 

People say preschool Is important in 
getting ready for kindergarten. What do 
children learn? 

As the beginnings of a child s formal 
education, preschool lays the foundation 
for academic success In more ways than 
learning numbers and colors. » 

In a preschool setting a child learns to 



be a part of a group and how to listen. 
Children learn to take direction. They 
learn how to follow a lead and work coop- 
eratively with their peers. They have suc- 
cesses and feel good about themselves. 
They learn to respect others and to re- 
spond to ideas other than their own. They 
may even learn to share. All of, these ben- 
efits, which come about through play, are 



important tools for a child to have as he 
enters kindergarten. Although non-acade- 
mic skills, they are valuable for a child to 
possess as she continues up the ladder of 

education. 

The early years are indeed, important 
years of learning. Just remember: A good 
preschool experience should stimulate a 
child's curiosity and the desire to learn — 



something all parents want for their chil- 
dren. . 
Editor's note: Marilyn Straus, an early 
childhood specialist, continues her col- 
umn as a service of the Child Care Coali- 
tion of Lake County. Send questions or 
concerns to Dear Marilyn, c/o Child Care 
Coalition, P.O. Box 1252, Highland Park, 
IL 60035. 







State renews quality projec 




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i' =.*-■; 





; 



Children lea rn to work with their peers.-Carol Brusslan photo at Family Network 

~~ JCYS CRMP HENRY HOMER 

PRE-SCHOOL & CHILD CARE 

CENTER - ' 



X^f &aifding on tradition 
"***' ^ for over 90 years! 

REGISTER NOW 

for 
•Pre-School 3-sy«. 

•Child Care 2-5 M 

jjfc^Just Us Explorers 

^T\ Located in Lindenhurst 

I 



ThroughUieefforUofSenatorTerrylink ^^' mfhs 'S^l^ll^ bl ' 

help the Coalition raise the level of quality later problems, 

child care and education in Lake C ounty. The 
Quality Project has enabled the ^— " 
Coalition to provide early child- 
hood educators and caregivers 
with scholarships to the College 
of Lake County, bring nationally 
known experts to Lake County to 
speak with parents and teachers 
and to help child care centers 

earn accreditation ;— a mark of 

quality beyond state licensing. 
Among future goals to be 

reached through the state grant 

is the creation of a Child Coali- 
tion web site. The site would help 

families understand the value of 

quality care and learn how and 

where to find it. It also would 

provide information to increase 

u,TchuTreS denCein " Sing s55 Senator Terry Link visits children at H.ghland 

Se na?or&nksaidheurged Park Community Nursery School and Day Care Cen- 

his colleagues to support the ear- ter.— Photo by Carol Brusslan 

ly education funding because, 

tsinder^arten 

+ Pay Care 
-t- Fi "ill Tims Job 
CondeW 




Full-Day 
Kindergarten 



Problem: 



Solution: 



267fO(A.MppersmkRc/. 
fngfesida, (L 600? f 

Caff &usan Klein 
for more information 

8<f7-7<t0~S0f0 



Located in Lindenhurst 
18mos.-3yrs. with adult 



Convenient before and after kindergarten care 

• Open from 6:30 am to 6:00 pm all year long 

. Solid core curriculum with class size limited to 20 students 

• Certified teacher; full-time teachers assistant 

• Special events, holiday and summer programs 

• Innovative program celebrating its seventh year 

• Intcrgenerational activities 



<S> 



Condell Day Center 

FOR INTERGENERATIONAL CARE 



Call 816-4585 

to visit our unique 
program in Libertyville. 



S 









*w£ v 



*N 



Agape Care ^ 



V? 



AF 



Program 

1999/2000 

A Children's Ministry of 

The Evangelical Free Church 

ofWauconda 

27215 N. Anderson Road 

847-526-8372 or 8254 



^SHI-oclUio 



Includes Transportation 
To & From All District 
118 Schools Including 
Cotton Creek In 
Island Lake. 



AgapeX&re -Is More 1 nan A riace 
To Warehouse Your Children Until 
■ Ydupkk^emUp... 
It's About Time! 

Story Time 
Computer Time 

Gym Time 
Homework Time 




\ CHERISHED CHILDREN 

Early Learning Center Inc. 

406 Wa»hinflton Boulewd. Mandelein. tt 
847*566-1471 



For Children Going Into 
Kindergarten Thru 5th Grade. 



> **^ Where Each Child is Cherished 

SoS^fe Through a Warm and 

Full Summer Program Nurturing Environment 

'licensed From Infants Through Age 10 
•Full-Day Kindergarten 

•Low Ratios 

•Two Age-Appropriate Playgrounds 

'Gymnastics Program 

Longevity of Teachers is 5 to 17 Years 












1 , 



•J- '■■'«i i»ti I, t- i. . 



■ * * .'■' ".Zt^.V *-*«-*^WJAii^»-^.- '"■•'_:.' 



* * 



/ Lakeland Newspapers 



BACK TO SCHOOL 



August 13, 1999 






r. i 






Monte*sori 

SCHOOL 

Admits students or any race, color, 

ethnic or national origin 

2 Year - 6 Year Old Program 

Full Day - 1/2 day Available 

Offering: Kindergarten, Ballet, Gymnastics, Art Glass 

New Beginnings 
Monlcssori School 

1401 S. Lake Street 

Rlc, 45 - North of Route 60 

Mtmdctclii, Illinois 60060 
Telephone: 847-560-4345 




Stock your freezer and 
cupboard with key foods 



KIDDIE UNIVERSITY, INC. 

,,c Zkt entu untaefstlif lhal accepts 3-5 y«rt/ clh 

Lake Villa, IL • 356-27 18 

PRE-SCHOOL 

• 3-5 year olds 

• 4-year degreed teachers 

• Mon/Wed/Fri or 

Tue/Thurs 
•9:00-11:30 a.m. 
or 12:30-3:00 p.m. 

• IDCFS licensed 

• 24 years experience 

• Come join the fun! 




KIDDIE UNIVERSITY 



The end of summer means back to school, to 
child care or to work and a return to different 
meal schedules and menus. Adjusting to more 
scheduled meal times should encourage us to es- 
tablish good eating habits after indulging our- 
selves during the summer with fast foods and on- 
the-fly meals. 

Whipping up a meal at home may sound like 
more work than ordering a pizza or stopping for 
fast-food carryouts, but if you have some key foods 
in your freezer or cupboards, a delicious dinner 
may be no more than a few minutes away. Try 
some of these "speed-scratch" ideas to get food on 
the table fast: 

•Stock up on pasta, rice and canned beans. To 
these basic items add spaghetti sauce or salsa in a 
jar and top with a little grated cheese. If you have 
time, brown lean ground beef or turkey and add It 
to the sauce. 

•Keep frozen vegetables in your freezer so you 
can add vegetables to pasta, rice or quick stews. 



Try cutting up some lean beef or chicken into btte 
size pieces and stir-fry the meat with a mixture of 
frozen cauliflower, broccoli, mushrooms and green 
peppers. Add a prepared stir-fry sauce and serve 
over rice. 

•Cook once, eat twice more. On the weekend 
prepare and freeze meals to eat later In the week. 
Soups, stews and sauces store well in the freezer. 
Use plastic containers or thick plastic bags to store 
meal size portions and label and date the pack- 
ages. 

•Let someone else cook. Check the nutrition la- 
bels on frozen dinners and take-out foods from 
your supermarket or dell so you're sure the prod- 
ucts meet your family's nutirtional needs. To make 
these ready-made foods appealing, serve them on 
your good dishes. Round out your dinner with veg- 
etables or a salad, a loaf of warm bread and fruit 
topped with yogurt for dessert.— fly CharleneHen- 
drickson, B.S,N., R.N., former consultant with Lake 
County Health Department 



Reduce the risk of Sudden Infant 
Death Syndrome (S1DS) 



y Little Lamb Christian Pre-School ^ 

'We Specialize in Quality Early Childhood Education' 



Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the 
sudden and unexplained death of an infant under 
one year of age. Doctors don't know what causes 



SIDS, but they have found that one of the most im- 
portant things a parent can do is to put a healthy 
baby on his or her back to sleep. 



SERVING AGES 3-12 



MORNING 

PRESCHOOL, & 

" EXTENDED CARE, 

BEFORE/AFTER 
SCHOOL PROGRAMS 



a 



OPEN 6:30 JUM:0O P.M. 
MON-FRI 



36448 N. FULLER RD..GURNEE 



360-9042 




Best Sleep Position 



Make sure your baby goes to sleep on his or her back. This provides the best 
protection against SIDS. 



Living Waters 

Christian School AH & PH Preschool & Kindergarten 

Register now jor Before & After Care - All Grades 

1999.2000. Character Bnilding Cnrricnlnm 

Preschool through 

Sixth Grade 525 Aft"" 011 Road < Grayshke 223*7591 




If you choose to use the side sleep position, make sure your 
baby's lower arm is forward to stop him or her from rolling 
over onto the stomach. 



% Alternative Sleep Position 

* 
<t 




If you have any questions about your baby's sleep position or health, first talk to your doctor 
or nurse. For more information about the Back to Sleep campaign, call free of charge, 1-800-505- 
2742. Or you can write to: Back to Sleep, P.O. Box 291 11, Washington, D.C. 20040. 




YOUTH 

ZION WINGS YOUTH HOCKEY ASSOC. 

REGISTRATION 

The Zion Wings Hockey Association is sanctioned by 
USA Hockey, Inc. and affiliated with the Amateur Hockey 
Association Illinois, Inc. 
In-house and instructional registration now open until 

9/1 1/99. In-house and Instructional Beginners are to register at the 

Zion Park District office, located in the upper level of the Leisure 

Center at 2400 Dowie Memorial Drive, Zion, IL. 

Registration hours are from 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. 

on weekdays, and 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. on 

Saturdays. 

Skaters that would like to try out for the 

Zion Wings Travel teams; must register by 

Thursday, August 19th Mandatory try-outs will 

begin on Thursday, August 19th. For more infor- 
mation, please call 746-5503 





vfLL§a£>3%^ 



101 Center St. Grayslake • 847-548-2770 
www.villagevision.com 

Free Ice cream cone from PHIL'S with each student exam. 

(Good August & September ) 
Student exam $45 with glasses purchase. 

Some restrictions apply. 



.-L- 



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. 



August 13, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers I C1 1 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
- Full-Time 



\ 



220 



Help Wanted 
Fall-lime 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Manufacturing 
WENEED 

YOUR SKILLS!!! 

Leading, established 

electric motor, repair And 

service organization Is 

seeking SKILLED AND 

ENTRY LEVEL people to 

foin our thriving business. 

Experience is 

preferred, but we will 

train motivated workers! 

•MECHANICS 

Troubleshooting & repair 

of electric motors, 
gearboxes, pumps, etc. 

Position requires 
. mechanical aptitude & . 
basic tools; electrical, ' 
machining, or welding 

knowledge a plus. 

BRING YOUR TALENTS 

TO US! We offer a 

competitive salary and 

benefits package. 
Please apply In person 
or send resume with 

salary history to: 

McIIENRY ELECTRIC 

& SUPPLY CO, INC. 

4012 W. Main Street 

Mcllenry. Illinois 

Ph: 815-385-5530 

Fax: 81 5-385-61 12 

eoc m/f/dA' 



Secretary^ 

FIRST MIDWEST BANK 
Our growth b your gain! First 
Midwest Dank, Lake County's 
leading bank group, has a great 
opportunity for an experienced: 
SECRETARY 
•ZION FACILITY* 
Yon will provide confidential 
•dmlaUtntfre inpport for Ibc 
banking center praldeot TbU 
will include recording minutes 
from uciutltt nccuogi, meet- 
ing planning ft scheduling, 
preparing correspondence, and 
adnlnlfterlng the day-to-ir/. 
accutire area fooctlonj. We 
require drong aperience In • 
ilmiUr *dmlnlsiratl»e letting, 
typing ikilU of 50-60 wpra, and 
• profeHlonal manner ft 
appearance. Knowledge of 
Wtndowt software application* 
. (word procoflng) and tbort- 
baad or ipeed writing preferred. 
We arc one of Uk top 100 com- 
panies In Chicago and moring 
■p. We hare over $9 trillion la 
tucts and terre orer 4i com* 
monltle* la Mlnolt. We offer an 
attradlre total compensation 

and benefit* package. For 

Immediate consideration fend 

your icmc to? 

Hunan Resource* 

Flnt Midwest Bank 

9)9 Lakeriev Parkway 

Suite 195 

ternon Mils, IL 60061 

FAXi M7-918-3&S9 

oreaIlS47-91ft-3&2 

v v/br more Information. 

cocmnVdVr 






AUTO 
TECHNICIANS 

immcd Openings- 
Milwaukee, VVI. Dodge 
City is olTcrlng a $3000 
signing bonus for quali- 
fied Techs. Wc have a 
very busy Service DepL 
& are In need of add'l 
Techs for both 1st & 2nd 
shifts. We also offer vrkly 
guarantees plus bonuses 
for qualified people. If 
you are always worried 
about what kind of pay- 
check you're going to get 
If things get slow, call 
Jerry Kostman! Dodge 
City South 414-281-9100 



SUPERIOR 
OPPORTUNITIES 

QtstomcrSa\to.420^30K 

10 positions 

now available 

based on cxp, 

Call today! 



244-0016 
Gurnee 



5490016 
Vernon Hills 



SUPERIOR PERSONNEL 



HOUSEKEEPING 

Victory Lakes is crowing and 

now has FLEXIBLE full and 

part-time position* available on 

various shllls for hard-working 

and depondaWo people to 

keep our beautiful facility clean 

and safe. Complete benefits 

package available II you work 

mora than 20 hours/Week, 

Previous experience prelerrod. 

Please apply in person: 

1055 East Grand Avenue 

Llndentiurst,lL 60046 

(between routes 83 and 45 

|ust East of Deep Lake Rd.) 

Or for more 

Information call 

B47-35M551 

equal opportunity empf 



N 1 CAS A has a full time position available in 

Client Services 

at its Round Lake OOlcc. Hours are Mon. thru Fri. 8:00 am unlil 
4:00 pm. Responsibilities include customer contact, tiling, word 
processing, cash receipts and phone coverage. Good commun- 
ication skills and being part of a learn are necessary. 
Bilingual (Spanish) a plus. 

Send or fax resume to 

Rac Anne Yost, Human Resources Administrator 

31979 N. Fish Lake Road, Round Lake, IL 60073 

FX B47-546-6760 

F.OE 



SECURITY 
PROFESSIONALS 



A world leader In 

protective services 

has an excellent 

opportunity for 

dependable 

individuals in the 

Northern suburbs. 

• Mall security 

• Premier office 
locations 

Excellent wages & 
full benefits. 

For consideration, 
please call 

(630) 620-0273 

The Wackenhut 
Corporation 

EOE-M/F/D/V 



INSURANCE CSR/SALES REP 



' Successful Candidate must have strong typing/ 

computer skills. 

• $20,000 Base Salary + Bonuses 

• Earn Between $30 - 40 K 

• Full Benefits/Pension + Profit Sharing 

• Will Train 

Insure on the Spot 

Ubertyville '• 

Ask for Steve 

B47-803-22G6 or fax resume 7 0B-S65-7G39 t 



CUSTODIAN 

MunrJeloln School District 75 Is hiring a night 

custodian, 3:00-11:00 p.m., starting on 
August 23, 1999. Salary Range: $8.50-9.7S/hr 
based on experience. Applications are avail- 
able at the District 75 Central Office, 330 N. 
California Ave., Mundelein, IL 60060, 
847-949-2700. 
Application deadline August 17, 1999. 



r>tm 



JAJY SE 




WAITRESS 
Immediate 

position 

weekends 

Call JUKEBOX 

847-587-8088 



RECYCLE 



I 




Of Vernon Hills 

Now Hiring 

• SERVERS 

HOST/HOSTESSES 

Full or Part Time 

Flexible Hours 

Great Benefits & Pay 

Will Train 

Apply 

1S1 E. Townllne Rd. 

Vernon Hills 

847-680-9980 



1 



THE OLIVE 
GARDEN 

961 Lakehurst Rd 

Waukegari, IL 60085 

Wc Are Looking For Fun 
Interesting People For the 

Following Positions: 
Servers 
Hosl/IIostcss 
Full and Part Time posi- 
tions. Day or Evening 
Schedules 
Fill out Application 
During Business Hours 
No Phone Calls Please 



TYPESETTER 

Lakeland Newspapers is looking 
for a part-time energetic person to i 
join our Composition Team. Person^ 
must have computer knowledge, 

be detail oriented, possess 

organization skills; and be able 

to'/ type 50 wpm or more. 

Please contact 

Neal Tucker 

(847)223-8161 (ext. 123) 

30 S. Whitney St. 

G rays I a ke, I L 60030 

Lakeland 

Newspapers 




NORTH CHICAGO CUSD #187 



j 
o 

B 

F 
A 
I 
R 




Friday, August 13,1999 

8:30 a.m. to Noon 

at A.J. Katzenmaier Middle School 

1829 Kennedy Drive 

(corner ofArgonne& Kennedy) 

North Chicago, IL 

Day of Fair, call 

(847) 689-6330 

We will be hiring the following positions 
For the 1999-2000 School Year 

Elementary Teachers 

Middle School Teachers 

EMH Teacher - High School 

.English Teacher - High School 

Orchestra Director 

Teacher Aides 
Building Secretaries 

Please bring 3 copies of your resume. 
And copies of certification (if applicable) 

For further Information coouct: 

Alice Sherrod 

Director, Human Resources 

North Chicago Community Unit School District #187 

2000 Lewis Avenue 

V North Chicago, IL 60064 

Or call 

Human Resources it (847) 689-8150 



J 


B 

F. 
A 
I 
R 




JOB FAIR 3-7 p.m 



EVERY TUESDAY and THURSDAY in AUGUST 
IMMEDIATE TESTING AND INTERVIEWS!! 

Customer Service Reps. 

(POSITIONS FOR OUR WAUKEGAN FACILITY) 

• Starting' pay Is $13.00 per hour $$ 
Hours: 10:00 a.m.-6:30 p.m. 

Bonus, Incentives, 401 k savings. $$$$ 

Medlcal/Llfe Insurance. 

Educational reimbursement. 

1 6 paid days off /8 paid holidays each year. 

Workout room, sauna, and Jogging trails. 

Close to 1-94 and 137. 

.- 
Requires: 

• Ability to type 33+ wpm 

• Strong communication skills 

• College degree preferred 

immediate testing and Interviews from 3-7 
p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays at our 
Human Resources Recruiting Center. 



ULINE 



Shipping Supply Specialists 

950 Albrecht Drive 

Lake Bluff, IL 60044 

Pax: (888) 847-0384 

Phone: (847| 295-0710 





employment 
-DtntM.tMTHi* 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
FuU'Tlme 






pfMYERS 

Immed Openings. 

Become an Owner 

Operator in the 

flatbed van 

operations. Local. 

regional or longhaul. 

No credit checks. 

No money down. 

No forced dispatch. 

Conventional white 

Volvos w/watk-in 

sleepers. Must 

have 1 yr. verif 

flamed exp. 

800-408-1396 



Immcd. Opening- 

Madison, Wl. Proficient 

In ring sizing & gem 

setting on gold, silver 

& platinum. F/T with 

exc. benefit pkg. 
Resume: Attn Beverly, 
Diny's, 702 N. Mldvale 

Blvd. Madison, Wl 

53705; Email 
Diny3Jlrs@aol.com; 

Call for Interview 

608-238-5832 



Serious Business for Serious Drivers! 



_ . 






* Eicellent Par &Creal Mile* 

* Average Length Or Haul li 1.200 Miles 

* 95% No Touch Freight 

* B5% Drop 4 I took 

* Assigned Frrightllncr ComentlonaJ* 

* Safely Bonifies 

* Medical Bene fin in 30 days 



M^flMMtirm 



Call Today For Details 1-800-729-9770 



SHEET METAL MECHANIC 

2 Must have knowledge of basic sheet metal fab- 
2 rication, duct sizing and common furnace and 
JA/C Installations. 3-5 years experience 
n required. Commercial and industrial installation 
A experience is beneficial, but not required. 

WE OFFER COMPETITIVE WAGES 

* 401 K, Paid Insurance, Holidays & Vacations 

* Call ( 847) 223-8877 or apply in person: 

8 NORTHERN MR SYSTEMS 

{ 683 L CENTER ST. 

^ GRWSIMIE,IL6C030 J 




How To 

Survive 

The Job 

Search 

Bv Nancv Sakbl 

Q: I lost my job 8 months ago due to downsizing at 
(name withheld). I recently started applying for jobs 
and have been real particular as to where I will work 
and for how much money. I have been collecting Illinois 
unemployment up until now. I received a letter from 
their office informing me that my checks have stopped 
until I come in and speak with my unemployment rep- 
resentative. I did. 1 was told that they have reason to 
believe that 1 have not been actively looking for employ- 
ment or turning down positions that were offered tome. 
I have only been on 4 interviews. One of the positions 
was for a company that was affiliated with the one I was 
laid off from for the same starUng salary that I was mak- 
ing when I left. I told my representee that I didn't take 
the position because It took me too long to gel there In 
the morning . I was trying to explain to them that even 
though the company that offered the job was only 4 
miles different in location than toy past employer, it 
took me 20 minutes longer to getlo. 1 don't want to 
spend 35 minutes in the car ever? 'morning rushing to 
work. So I told them 1 turned dowijthe offer, They told 
me they felt that I was making qi mistake since my 
unemployment checks were getting ready to end. They 
say they don't feel my reasons were acceptable and will 
proceed to. take this to (he next Iwel, (whatever that 
means). Do you feel this is fair thltt am cut off because 
I didn't take something 1 didn't wttU? K.M. - Gurnee 



; 



A: Do I feel this is fair? After reading your letter.. .let me 
make sure that 1 am understanding thIs..,you have been 
unemployed for 8 months and collecting unemploy 
men t benefits.. .you state that you have only just recent- 
ly started applying for jobs (whlchk a problem in itself), 
and have only gone on 4 intervjeys. What have you 
been doing for all the months tjrtl you were unem- 
ployed? You have been offered a jjfclhat matched your 
ending salary, that is 4 miles ffjry from the former 
employer and your biggest comj$£tt is that the traffic 
on the day you interviewed was J tO-minute inconve- 
nience,. .what do I think? -w 
Poor you! :' 



Note: Nancy SaJkol U ■ lice rued personnel profeulonal 
and Pmldrnt of Superior Personnel In Gurnee. 

Ltliert can be tent to Nincy Sikol 

c/o Like) and Newiptpcrs, 

P.O. Boi26fl, Crayslike, IL60030 

PLACEMI0iol.com 





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r7T jr: * -»i ?s<y^*'g-t-* J!'' ■ * "*»** V *» w* « » i r » •«*-'» 



I , . » 



C 1 2 / Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



August 13, 1999 



li 



220 



Help Wanted 
riill-Timc 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



QA TECHNICIAN 

Wa are looking for a reap., sell* 
starter to support our QA dept. on 
2nd shilt. To qualify you MUST: 

• HAVE MANUFACTURING EXP 

• BE COMPUTER LITERATE 

• HAVE THE ABUTYTO USE VARIOUS 
MEASURING INSTRUMENTS 

•• WILL TRAIN! •• 

Apply In person or send/fax 

847-395-6862 resume ta 

Human Resources Dept 

NuWay Speaker Products, Inc. 

905 Anita Ave. 

Antiocli. IL 60002 



OFFICE HELP 

EXCITING, HIGH 

PAYING, FULL-TIME 

OPENING AT BEAUTIFUL 

NEW STORE, DILLER 

L&T.ASSTMOR. 

HOURLY OR SALARY W/ 

BENEFITS AVAIL. (40 J K. 

INS..OFLEXIBLE 

GURNEE DODGE 

7255 GRAND, GURNEE 

847-623-3000 



I Work for l?je **hoUesr retailer In 

fine Wimsi Spirits,. 

And Up into in outsundin; new 
| ulcer with everyone's choice; Cold 

Sl3it(linLChic.-olindi'l]r;cst 

I retailer of line wines and spirits, we 

I ire seeling enthusi isiic sen icc-ori- 

[ented professbals for our MtHenry 

; location to handle a variety of store 

functions. Join is as: 

STORE ASSOCIATES 

KdII Time and Part-Time 

(AltnrtiieCompercation, 

I Adiinreineiil Potential and B*«fitsl 

j To qualify' you must be able to lift 

40-50 lbs. and available to wcrt a 

Dexible schedule. Previous retail 

experience a plus. Foe immediate 

consideration, apply in person or 

I ca!I: Cold Standard 4610 W, Elm 

|sL.MtlleorT,IL«0050,Pll:8IS- 

3S5-3200, Equal Opportunity 

Employer. 



Seeking Infant and 
Toddler Teachers to 

work at our 

Arlington Heights, 

Libertyvillc, and 

Vernon Hills 

Child Care Centers! 

Career opportunities available for 
individuals uhn haw ccnler-bisi-d 
cxjhtIciicc, bcUcw In a child- 
centered approach to curriculum 
and arc committed lo a partnership 
with working parents. In ourNAEYC 
Accredited, chltd-ccntercd class- 
munis, we'll provide you with the 
frame wnrk and flexibility to create 
a developmental appropriate 
ciirriculum to help children grow. In 
our work-site centers you'll enjoy 
outstanding support and training, 
and advancement opportunities. We 
offer excellent benefits • tuition - 
rclmursemenl, medical, dental, 
■tOJtk), vacation, sick pay and 
more! Call our 24-lmur job line at 
(8«8) 348-2991 rat 1641: 
fax resume to (630)221-1293 
or E-mail to 

KrJucci@briglilhorlitons.com 
EOE 



Site Directors and Teachers 

Wanted 

Due to expansion the YWCA School age pro- 
gram has immediate openings for DCFS qual- 
ified Site Directors and Lead Teachers. 
Experience required. Summer and Fall 
positions arc available. Call Jeralyn at 

YWCA 

2133 Bolvidere Rd. • Waukegan, IL 

(847) 662-4624 



JOHN CRANE, INC., the world's leading 

manufacturer of engineered seals and sealing 

systems has openings at their Fox Lake 

manufacturing facility for: 

2nd and 3rd shift 

CNC MACHINIST 

Qualified applicants will have experience reading 
blueprints, precision measuring instruments and 

will have a working knowledge of shop math. 

They will also have experience programming 
FANUC controllers in G-code. 

lohn Crane offers a competitive salary, paid 

lunches, <101{k), tuition reimbursement, medical 

insurnce, dental, vision, long and short term 

disability, stock options, pension and paid 

holidays. To find out more or to apply for one of 

these outstanding opportunities, please apply in 

person between 7am and 3:3()pni at: 

John Crane, Inc. 

104 Sayton Rd. • Fox Lake, IL 60020 
(847)587-0311 



ULINE IS GROWING! 



Uline - The Shipping Supply Specialists. Since 

1 980 Uline has experienced strong growth. We 

now have 4 distribution centers across the 

country and a 5th on the way. Come grow with us. 

Mechanic Needed 

CROWN-FORKLIFT 

(AT OUR WAUKEGAN FACILITY) 

• A very competitive salary with 2-5 years experience, SSSS 

• 401k savings. SS$S 

• Warehouse uinforms arc provided at no cost. SSSS 

• Year-end performance bonus. SSSS 

• Medical/Life insurance. 

• Educational reimbursement up to $1,000 a year, 

• 16 paid days off/8 paid holidays each year. 

• Comploto workout room, sauna, and Jogging trails. 

• Close to I-94 and 137. 

For consideration completes an application or send resume* 
to our Human Resources Recruiting Center: 



ULINE 



Shipping Supply Specialists 

950 Albrecht Drive 

Lake Bluff, IL 60044 

Fax: (888) 847-0354 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



BRICK LAYERS 

Immed Opening. 
Gov't masonry 

contractor needs 

exp'd Laborers. 
Must have min 
10yrsexp. Duties 
incl bldg scaffold- 
ing, making mortar, 
mlsc duties. Out of 

state work. Must 
be willing to travel. 

303-623-5455 



QOMLfiO 

FFo&ke'Scfi6oI 

School Bus Drivers 

needed for the 99-00 

school year. Full time 

and part lime positions 

available. Benefits and 

bonus incentives. For 

' more Information 

contact 

Bill Lomas @ 

587-2535 



| SCHOOL BUS DRIVER] 

Must have CDL License ond School Bus Permit 
to drive n school bus in Illinois, Please sent! letter 
. of Interest ami resume to: 
11 na M. Dctabrc 
Director of Transportation 
Warren Township High School 
500 N. O'Plainc Koad 
Gurnec, IL 60031-2686 
8i7-59<M787 




I 
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ft 
I 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 
ft 



BUILDING & GROUNDS 
ASSISTANT NEEDED 

ServiceMaster/McHenry H.S. Dist. 156 

• Good health/able to lift & 

carry heavy items 

• Operate & maintain various types 

of landscaping equipment 

• Work outdoors in various 

weather conditions 
• Eighteen yrs. or older 

• Valid driver's license & Insurable 
Call Ken or Mary @ (815) 344-7178 or 

Fax resume to (815) 344-7179 



If 
I 
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If 
V 
V 

1 
• 

V 
V 

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V 
V 

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MODEL SHOP 
TECHNICIAN 



We have an immediate opening in our model shop for a technician. 
Duties include assembly ol prototype & fabrication work. The Ideal can- 
didate will be a quick learner. Musi be able lo read a taps measure & 
understand the decimal system. We offer pay based on experience & 
an excellent fringe benefit pkg.' 
Please mail or fax resume: 
JOHN BARTOSKI 



CARTER-HOFFMANN CORP. 

1551 McCormlck Ave. Mundelein, IL 60060 

Fax B470G2-5Q74 

E.O.E. 



GENERAL FACTORY WORK 

MATERIAL HANDLER 

Nichols Aluminum, a team-oriented manufacturer of 
aluminum rolled colls and sheet, has Immediate openings for 
Material Handlers at our Lincolnshire, IL facility. . 
The candidates we are looking for will have a background In 
Industrial work with forklift experience. Mechanical apUtude 
would be a plus. Starting wage is $9.70 per hour with an 
Increase to $1 1.36 per hour after 90 days. We offer a 
comprehensive benefit package Including Safety and 
Productivity monthly bonuses, medical, dental, and life 
insurance, and a 40 IK program with company matching 
after one year of service. 

We work two 12-hour shifts seven days a week, on a 3-2-2 
schedule {work 3 days, off 2 days, work 2 days off 3 days) 
Please apply in person at: 
Nichols Aluminum ■ 
200 Scheltcr Rd., Lincolnshire, IL 60069 
Two blocks west of corner of Milwaukee and 
Rte. 22, then south on Schctter.' 
Equal Employment Opportunity M/F/V/H 



% 



Maintenance Technician 

Chicago Cutlery, Inc., lias an liiuucdlutc opening for a 

Maintenance Technician. RMponsihiillts include 

maltiulnfajjj niodilyfnj', repairing und rebuilding it variety of 

complex plant machinery and cipiipuii-iil including electrical, 

mechanical and pneumatic machines; planning and performing 

maintenance operations requiring a high degree of specialty, 

making complex replacement parts: troubleshooting; ability to 

use complex blueprints and schematics and understand various 

machine spccificaiian,s. 

The Ideal candidate must have a high school diploma or 

equivalent plus irade school training, minimum of.VS years 

hands-on experience in Industrial niaJnieiiaiice, knowledge of 

and experience \viih a variety of shop tools and their applications, 

manual dexterity, good hand-eye coordination, and ability to lift up 

to 75 lbs. Experience with computerized PM systems preferred. 

This full time position offers coiupelitive salary, bonus capability 
and comprehensive benefit package including medical, dental, life 
insurance, -iO I (k), pension, pd. vacation & holidays. To apply 
please send or fax your resume Including salary history to: ' 

Chicago Cutlery, Inc. 

411 W. Homier Road 

Wiiucoiidii, IL 60084 

Attn: UK Mgt/LN 

Fax: 847-526-2 154 

No phone calls please. Final candidate must pass drug screen. 
EOE 



220 



Help Wanted 
:FAtU-Timc 



FontlSmlct ' 

TASTE SUCCESS 

... ulih ARAMARK Campus 
Senlccst We seek dependable 
Individuals to |uin our large opera- 
linn In Lake Forts! for the folliiw- 
IngFulUPJil-tlmeposllInns: 
•Prep Cooks 
•Chefs 
•Cashiers 
•Dishwashers 
We offer excellent compensation & 
benefits Including paid wallow, 
lic-allli Insurance ft ninrel Interested 
candidates can call & leave mice 
null at: (847) 295-4450, 
EOEnVf/uVv 



Customer Sarvlco 

VENDOR CONTACT 
COORDINATOR 

Medline, a leading manufacturer 
& distributor of medical lupptles, 
has an Immediate full-lime oppor- 
tunity for a customer service- 
orknlcd Individual to edit & 
process direct P.O.'s. Working 
closely with vendors & our divi- 
sions, this coordinator will resolve 
problems/discrepancies on vendor 
returns. A background Including 
customer service and accounting 
experience Is desirable; CRT 
familiarity helpful, To took Into 
this excellent opportunity, ptease 
send resume lo: 
Medline Industries, Inc., 
Employment Dept. SC-VC, 

One Medline Place. 

Mundelein. IL 60060-4486. 

Fu« (847) 949-2109. 

EOE m/r/d/v 

MEOUNC 

r 



Banking 
$500 SIGN-ON BONUS 

SR. IN-STORE 
SERVICE REP 

Individual will maintain/ 
balance a cash drawer, 
provide cust. scry., sell bank 
products & assist other 
tellers. Rcq. exc. cornm. 
skills and 3:4 yrs. sales, 
cash handling & cust. scrv. 
cxp.- 

CUSTOMER 
SERVICE REPS. 
Individual is responsible for 
analyzing cust. needs and 
fulfilling (hem through the 
sale of products/services. 
Req. min. 1-2 yrs. cust. 
scrvJsnles cxp., exc. cornm 
skills & PC cxp. 

Apply at 722 E. Rollins Rd. 
ROUND LAKE BEACH. 
Or fax your resume lo: 
773-804-2440. Attn: 
HR/GR. EOE mfdv 



St Paid 

leilcral 

flank 



www.stpaulbank.com 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



Insulation 

Installers 

Needed 

experience 

preferred, but will 

train if needed. 

Southern Wl & 

Northern IL area 

Builders 
Insulation 

815-875-0085 



. 



; 



KinderCare 

Learning Center 

in Mundelein is an 
N.A.B.Y.C accredited 
STATE-OF-THE-ART 
facility. We arc seeking 
ECE professionals to 
JOIN OUR TEAM. Full 
and Part-time positions 
available. Excellent bene- 
fits, competitive salary, 
team work atmosphere. 

Call (847) 970-9554 

A- 

In I iff 



IGAIN VALUABLE EXPERIENCE WITH 
"HANDS ON" EMPLOYMENT 

Monday-Friday as a 

TEACHER'S ASSISTANT at a 

Gurnee private school for 

the fall 1999 school year 

7:00am-3:30pm or 9:30am-6:00pm 

Health benefits and paid sick days 

Call 244-9352 



ACCOUNTING 

Duo to promotion, we currently have a full time 
position In our accounting dept. This position 
will report to the controller and he responsible 
for A/R, A/I* and some collections. The ideal 
candidate should have some bookkeeping 
experience and be proficient on a PC. 
We offer a competitive salary and excellent 
benefits. To apply please fax resume Willi 
salary history to 847-855-0876 
Attn: Mary Jane Pennann 



*>■ -^CHEVROLET 

jlffEGA STORf 

INVENTORY CLERK - Full-time Days, 8-5. Auto 
| Dealer Exp. Pref., but will train. Must be dependable 
I and a team player. 

| LICENSE & TITLE CLERK -lull-Time days, 9-6. Auto J 

( Dealer cxp. pref., hut will train. Must be detailed and | 

| able to handle many tasks. 

Bnpplv in person: 

| 1000 E. Belviderc Rd. Grayslake, IL 60030 



INVENTORY/QUALITY ANALYST 

Elevtrii-al Manufacturer In Northern Suburbs seeks an In JUidu.il for the potion 
(if Imvnliiry/Quality AnalyM. ' 

Ri-portliiR In tin- VI'. of Operations, tuu will oivr>ce pln>lral Inventories and lt-.ul 
cult counts, Vou will also perform 'quality enntmt autlils and help nuintaln 
ili ii'ti i m illation per ISOyool quality standards. E\erelslng fndqivniliiil 
liidfivmi-tii, vmi Kill uYuiiip, implement and maintain polities and pnicnlurt-5 
for Nub imeiitnry and quality. 

Thrsuccrvful candid iale« will ha*v 3-5 years lAperientv wurklnR fur a manufac- 
turiiiR enmpany in an Imenlnry tir t|uallty piniilon, A lwt» year ciillcp.' dej^tv L< 
prefer n-d atihiiii^i r(|uivjlt.-iil job experinici' will be- I'linsdlervd, 
We offer a cuniprtlii'n>ln' .valary/tH'nefil plan. 

Send nsuiiiw lit: 

V.K OpiTations 

I'lMfrvar, Inc. 

28 1*7 N. Ballard Driu-. Suite C 

Lake Forest, IL ton 5 

Wi- are an Equal Opportunity Employvr 



Drivers/School eus 
( 



{-Lt[J\ v- Mkks K..»s C\rxis 




s 1,000 SIGN ON BONUS" 

NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRID 

Driving a school bus a few hours each day for 
Laldlaw Transit can be so rewarding! 

• $11.00 Per Hour 

(Higher For permitted Experts) 

• paid Training 

• Child care Assistance 

• No Nights or weekends Required 

• Summers & Holidays off 
(Additional Hours Available) ' 

• Advancement opportunities 




847-634-0331 

SERVING THE CHICAG0LANO AREA WITH 20 LOCATIONS 
Equal Opportunity Employer "New hires only. For most locations. 




Seeking 
Administrative 
Assistant and Early 
Childhood Teachers 
to work at our 
Center located in 
Waukegan! 
Wc seek energetic indi- 
viduals to work in our 
beautiful, NAEYC 
Accredited, child- 
centered classroom! 
Join our team of profes- 
sional dedicated to help- 
ing children grow in 
every way! Wc strive to 
create a positive envi- 
ronment for children. 
You'll enjoy outstand- 
ing support, training 
and advancement 
opportunities. Wc offer 
excellent benefits, 
tuition reim'b, medical, 
denial, 40 1 (k), vacation, 
sick pay and more! Call 
24-hour job line (888) 
348-2991 cxt. 1 64 1 or 
fax resume to 
(630)221-1293. 



a? 



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>le 

1 



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August 13, 1999 



220 



IMp Wanted 
'Full-Time 



220 




Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 

Full-Time 



220 


Help Wanted 
> Full-Time 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



CARPENTERS 

Orrcn Pickcll Builders Inc. 

is seeking carpenters, for 

their framing division. 

Requires some tools; valid 

driver's license. Excellent' 

benefits. Apply at 

Bannockbum office, 

2201 Waukegan Rd. 

Suite W-285, between 

hours of 
7:30 AM and 5:30 PM 



WANTED 

At 

Fnuiklin Foods 

In Waukegan a large 

Independent grocery 

store 

FRONT END 

MANAGER 

Please contact Eli or 

Zak 

at 847-265-1433 



CARPENTERS 
AND LABORS 

Carpenters and Laborer* are 
needed for all aspects of remod- 
eling. Some tools mniiretl. Vcar 
around work with established, 
highly reputable deslgit/hullder 
on N. Shore. 40 IK. profit shar- 
ing and pd. employee liwllh. 
&lting®KWJl-l/%29 



WAREHOUSE/ 
SHIPPING & 
RECEIVING 

Local business looking for a 
responsible, dependable indi- 
vidual to nil an entry level 

Warehouse/Shipping & 

Receiving position. Must 
speak fluent English. Apply 

in person @ 955 Campus 

Drive ion Bultcrficld. I 1/2 

mile N. of Rl. 60) 

Mundclcin (847)680-45-15 



DRIVER 

Direct Mail Marketing firm 

is looking for on entry level 

driver for local deliveries. 

Class 'C. CDL license 

with air brake endorsement 

required. Apply in person® 

955 Campus Dr. (off 

lluttcf field. I 1/2 mile N. 

of 60) Mundclcin 

(847)680-4545.." 



LOCAL LETTKR SI 101' 

NOW HIRING 

EXPERIENCED INSERTING 

MAO I INE OPERATORS 

ftr all shifts. Apply in person 

@ 955 Oimpus Dr. 

(orTDultcrfickl I 1/2 mile 

N.ofRL60)Mundcletn 

(847)6804545 

Only those w/ previous 

experience will be considered. 



WILDLIFE JOBS 

S21.60/HR 
INC. BENEFITS. GAME 
WARDENS, SECURITY. 
MAINTENANCE, PARK 

RANGERS. NO EXP 

NEEDED. FOR APR AND 

EXAM INFO CALL 

1-800-813-3585 

- EXT 2407 

8AM-9PM. 7 DAYS Ids ire 



$500 Bonus 

Great Clips in 

Liberiyville & 

Grayslahe 

$ Hourly Wage 

$ Incentives 

$ Weekly Bonuses 

Plus Benefits 

Ubertyrlllc (Karen) '575*1951 

Gr»r»UIte (Carrie) 548-4084 



COOK 

Seeking a cook to work at 
our Green Tree Child Care 
Center in Waukegan. Wdl 
train the right person. Full 
benefits, Call 24-hour job 
line at (888) 348-2991 
e*L 1641.; EOE 



OFI1D CARE TEACHER 

• Full-time/Part-time 
• MonrJay-Friday 
• Excellent Pay 
We offer an innovative 
school with develop- 
mental approach. 

Please call 
'847-356-2288 



;■( 



COLLECTIONS PROFESSIONAL 

Midwestern Regional Medical 

Center, a state-of-lhe-art 
Oncology treatment facility & part 
or Cancer Treatment Centers of 
America, seeks a dedicated pro- 
fessional lo assume immediate 
responsibilities for the collection 
of overdue balances. Collections 
background Is preferred; 
Healthcare exp. a plus. 
Explore our outstanding com pan - 
sation & benefit package, send 
your resume with salary require- 
ments to: Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center, I1R Dept. 
- 2520 Ellsha Ate. 
Zion, IL 60099. 
FAX: R47-872-6222. 
EOEm/t/dAr 



flE* 



Midwestern 

Tomorrows llospllal^ 

b Here Today "' 

www.cancercenier.cnm 



^Telemarketers* 

We we the fastest growing mtgafoe 

coropmy In the country, seeldngi 

self mourned, experienced letemir- 

kfler for our Miry Bdh'i BemJe 
World Mig&nK. You will be respon- 
sible for marketing die Beanie World 
magazine to jtfi shops & specially 
stores across the country. Heny cold 
calling, order fulfillment, data entry 
and some paperwork required. The 
Ideal candidate must hue i prat tele- 
phone demeanor, excellent kiterpcr - 
soul sUli and a stnmgcommlimenl 
lo computer service, Computer litera- 
cy and previous phone sales required 

We offer in excellent salary and bene- 
fits package! Qualified candidates 
should send/fax ihdr resume and 
nbry history to: I lunun Resources, 
I IAS Media. Inc. 2121 Wmkrgan Rd. 
Bannotkbum.llftWl5.Fu: 
B47/444-I149. 
Mo phone alls please 
EOE 



CUSTOMER SERVICE 

& SALES 

SENIOR POSITION 

Make n DifTc rente! 
lull lime days- Join our friend- 
ly, prorcssioiul leani & be a key 

pljyrr in the successful 
Corporate Sates & Service divi- 
sion of :i growing, direct mail 
marketer of fun food and pi ft 
items. If you are highly skilled 
in customer sales & service, 
confident in your abilities nnd 
eager to make an impact, this 

may be the place for jou. 
Position includes a variety of 
related functions & provides 
training & direction lo our 
seasonal staff. Requires related 
experience: excellent communi- 
cation skills & professional 
demeanor, leadership abilities: 

& a desire to grow. 

Convenient location close to 194 

and 1 76. offering coinpeutive 

pay & benefits. Apply at THE 

POPCORN FACTORY, Mon.- 

FrL9io3at 1 3970 W. Laurel 

Drive. Lake Foest. I L 60045 or 

FAXlo847-247-3.s40. 

Ph. R47-247-3352 

EOE 




Like working w/cMdren? 
We're looking for you! 

THE 
AFTERSCHOOLCLUB 

has full/part time spots as 
COUNSELORS and 

COLLECTIONS in 

Highland Park, 

Lake Bluff, Ubertyville, 

Oak Grove, 

Diamond Lake and 

Vernon Hills. 

Call Chris at 

847-573-0252 



WE NEED YOU NOW! 



Immediate Temp & 

Tcmp-To-llirc 
Opportunities for: 

■Administrative 

Assistants 

•Reception 

•General Clerks 
(•Customer Service 
| •Assembly 

• light Industrial 

Call today for an 
appointment 

(847)247-1300 
266 Hawihom 

Village Commons 

Vernon Hills, IL - 
60061 

ADECCO 

The Employment 

People 
EOE Never a fee 



WE NEED YOU N0W1 



Mim* 



GAL OPPORT 




NIGHT AIDE 



Immediate 

Full Time 

position 

available in our 

Lake Zurich 

facility. 

Experience not 

required. Willing 

to train 

9a.m.-6p.m. 



Contact Gall Becker 

Mount Saint Joseph 

Lake Zurich 

847-438-5050 



DENTAL 
TECHNICIAN 

NW Ark-Immed 

Opening. Dentures 

& some crown & 

bridge exp. Top 

wages, complete 

bnfts. Great work 

environment. 

Confidentiality. 

870-741-4641 

E-mail 

kredding@alltel.net 



MffiMMa^fiM: 



Day shift~FT-Must be 
experienced & certified. 
Position requires a team 
player with some man- 
agement skills. Ability to 
juggle multiple projects & 
strong desire to deliver 

high quality care 
required. LPN'S consid- 
ered for position. Exc. 
Salary + benefits. 

APPLY IN PERSON AT: 

CARE CENTRE OF 

WAUCONDA 

1 76 THOMAS CT. 

WAUCONDA, IL 60084 

847-526-5551 

FAX! 847-526-0807 



■ -• 



A.D.O.N. 

For long term facility. 
Clinical and documentation 
skills are a vital part of this 

position. Strong team 
leading a plus. 

RNorLPN 
Full-Time 

7 am • 5 pm 
3 pm-11 pm 

•Treatment Nurse Position 

Call: 

Belinda Slmms 

847-249-2400 

X53 

North Shore Terrace 
2222 W. 14th Street 

Waukegan, IL 60085 



Health Care 

CHEMISTRY 
SUPERVISOR-Days 

Midwestern Regional 
Medical Center. pJrt of 
Cancer Treatment Centers of 
America, seeks an MT (ASCP) 
certilted individual with a mln. of 
5 yrs. laboratory exp. to Join us. 
Applicants with a supervisory 
background are preferred. 

Explore our excellent comp- 
ensation Kt hi'tiefits package! 
Send resume to: Midwestern 
Regional Medical Center, HR 
Depl., 2520 Elisha Ave., . 
Zion. IL 60099. 
Fass 847-872-6222. 
P.UI-: in/f/d/v "SS4- 

M> "" ■■ ■' "" 

Tomorrows Hospital 

Is Here Today 
ww.caiiccrceiitjr.com 



Healthcare 

SUPERVISOR 

PATIENT 

REGISTRATION 

The Paiient Registration 

Department at Victory 

Memorial Hospital has an 

opportunity for a full lime 

supervisor. The ideal candidate 

should have ai least 2 yean 

experience in patient accounts 

or hospital admissions. 

Previous supervisory 

experience preferred. 

Primary functions include 

day-today supervision of the 

department and registration 

staff. Quality assurance and 

staff support and back-up are 

also required. 

Excellent salary bene fin 

package. 

Call or send resume to; 

Jennifer Alia- Human 

Resources 

VICTORY 

MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 

Waukegan. IL 60085 

Ph: 847O60-4I70 

Fax: 847-360-4230 

equal opportunity employer m/f T 




»"t<* : 3 



To place your, modi 
portunity hero, call Paula, 
at 847-223-81 61 



LPN/RN 

Seeking LPN/RN in 

our Lake Zurich 

Intermediate Care 

Facility. Need part 

lime, 2 PM to 10:30 

PM. Every other 
weekend is a must. If 

interested, contact 
D.O.N., Mt. Sl Joseph, 

847-438-5050 



Healthcare 

Experience Vlctoryl 
Two great opportunities are 
now available ton 

ULTRASOUND TECH 
Our new state-of-the-art 
Victory Surgical Treatment 
Center in Undenhurst, 
Illinois has a full time day. 
position, Monday-Friday with 
no call, previous abdominal 
and vascular ultrasound 
experience, ARDMS registry 
or eligibility are required. 
NUCLEAR MED 
TECH 
Victory Memorial Hospital in 
Waukegan. midway 
between Chicago and 
Milwaukee, has excellent 
opportunities In our 
Diagnostic Imaging 
Department. Full Time Day 
and Float Pool positions' 
require previous experience. 
For more in lor mat ion, 
please call or submit 
resume lo: 

Human Resources, 
VICTORY MEMORIAL 

HOSPITAL 

1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 

Waukegan IL 60085. 

Ph:B47-360-4170 

Fax: 847-360-4230 

Equal opportunity 

employer m/f 

V^VvtVlory Mtmarial lloiplul 



■::^ 



RN'S/LPN'S ■""" ] 

We need a FT 3-1 1 Charge 
Nurse. Our team of health- 
care professionals is looking 
for additional members. We 
offer advancement & educa- 
tional opportunities as well 
as a supportive environment. 
Will train & orient new 
grads. Excellent salary & 
benefit pkg. Send resume or 
apply in person at:, 

APPLY IN PERSON AT : 

CARE CENTRE OF 

WAUCONDA 

176THOMASCT. 

WAUCONDA, IL 

60084 

847-526-5551 

FAX # 847-526-0807 




( 



OH'K'IANVMANAGKK 



f3C National retail optical chain now has openings £5 

gin Vernon Hills. Wc are looking for aggressive -g 
-j. sales oriented dispensers who want to get ahead q 
O. in their field. Our positions provide good salary, c3 
C5 commissions and comprehensive benefits. Don't *g 
S pass up this great opportunity. I yr. exp. r^ 

O, required. Call (414)782-2590 anytime. P 

g E-Q.E. JS 



Caregivers Weeded 



Gentle Home Services, Inc., is currently accepting 

applications for responsible,' caring people to work 

with the elderly in their homes. 

No Experience Nceded-we will (rain. 

Purl time or full lime work available; 

Call Marv or Linda at: 

(847) 4J2-9100 



Healthcare 

MEDICAL RECORDS 
OPPORTUNITIES 

Victory Memorial Hospital 
has excellent positions 

available for. 
MEDICAL RECORDS 

TECHNICIAN 

To qualify for this part lime 

day position, you must be 

a graduate 01 a Medical 

records technician/ Health 

Information technology 

program. Typing ol 45-50 

WPM and computer skills 

are also required. ART or 

RRA preferred. 
MEDICAL RECORDS 
TRANSCRIPTtONlST 
Previous medical transcrip- 
tion experience in a hospi- 
tal or doctor's office essen- 
tial. Knowledge of medical 
terminology or anatomy 
and physiology courses 

are required. 3KK 
Typing of 55 WPM is also 

essential. 
We provide excellent pay 
and complete benefits. 
New grads welcome to 
apply. For more Informa- 
tion, call or send resume 
lo: 
;*;,- Cindy Ball 
847-360^170 
VICTORY 
MEMORIAL HOSPtTAL 
1324 N. Sheridan Rd. 
Waukegan IL 60085 
Fax: 847-360-4230 
equal quality employer m/f 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



DRIVERS 

Immed Openings. 

Mission Carriers 

now hiring 0TR 

Company & Owner 

Operators. Liquid 

exp, clear MVR. 

Good wk record. 

Jim 800-737-9951 

WVW' 



DRIVERS 

Immed. Opening. 

Seek Class A &B 

CDL & HazMat, 

must have' 2 yrs exp, 

must have clean 

driving rec. 

TRUCKING-Line 

Haul Drivers wanted 

to run to Mauston, 

WI every nite .28/mi. 

2 yrs exp needed. 

847-806-6731 

M-F, 9am-5pm 



SHIPPING 



•1st SHIFT 
GROWING MED- 
ICAL PACKING CO. 

•COMPETITIVE 
SALARY OFFERED 
•RELOCATING TO 
WAUKEGAN SOON 

APPLY IN PERSON: 

Medikmark, Inc. 

900 Asbury Drive 

Buffalo Grove, IL 

60089 

OR CALL 847/537-8575 

EXT. 5118 



I 



milium uititmnu •tiiNtnniitiHMHiiH^MtiiJ 

CLASSROOM ~ 
AIDE 

Immediate 

openings in our 

Lake Zurich 

Developmental 

Training Program. - 

Entry Level, will 

train. Duties include 

teaching d/d adutts 

functional 

area skills. If 

interested, contact 

ML St. Joseph, 

847-438-5050 



'lIlHIlllllllHlllllllllllllilllllHIIllHHlHtiillr, 



Drivers 

Immed openings. 

Independent contractors 

wanted to transport new & 

used tnicks in all 48 

slates & local. I*a\v niin 

ofS.9ICPM.for 2 tnicks 

at a time & $.52-$.65 CPM 

for moving I . Drivers 

pay for fuel if needed 

& provide a 

vehicle to tow behind 

tnicks. Class A or Class I) 

CDL, 2yrs OTR exp; clean 

appearance. 

Call 888-782-8050 : ; 

9:30a-2p CST, MAV. 



ADMINISTRATIVE 

ASSISTANT 

TEMP TO PERM 

$14,00 PER HOUR 

Our client. Fortune 200 
Vernon Hills, is seeking an 
Adm. Assistant to work in 

the Legal Dept. 

Opportunity for full time 

employment. Must know 

Windows 95 and MS Word 

Call 847/740-8307 or fax 

resume 847/740-8405 



MEDICAL 
RECEPTIONIST 



Luke Forest 

Pediatries Is 

seeking full-liinc 

receptionists. 

Duties include 

answering phones, 

nppt. scheduling 

; ami patient regs. 

Previous experience 

strongly preferred. 

Call Traccv at 

(847) 295-1220 or 

fax resume to 

(847)295-1255 



'"1 
sii 

» 
1 

"i 
;: 

"I 



V. 



It 



I'urkmif I.ul 

Siripiitii Crew 

Helpers Painters 



Mundelein established 
parking bt marking co. is 
seeking reliable trainees 
and experienced 
painters for striping 
crews. Some nights and 
weekends req. starting 
pay $9.00/hr. for no exp, 
must have trans. & and 
be willing to work over- 
time. Start tomorrow. 
Call Bob (847) 566-4995 



.^MW.MWW. 



— sooseosn 

SHIPPING/ 



a 



RECEIVING 

Duties include 
shipping/receiving, 
inventory and all related | 

duties as required. 
Knowledge of inventory, 

domestic and 
international shipping 

procedures and 

documentation helpful. 

Non-smoking facility. 

Apply in person at: 

ILLINOIS 

INSTRUMENTS, INC. 

27840 Concrete Drive 

(located in Lakemoor) 

Ingleside, IL G0041 

815/344-6212 



■saas 



3SSSSSS3 



Data Entry 

Looking for an exceptional 
entry-level opportunity? Then 
lum your attention to Medline, 
one of America's fastest grow* 
ing providers of medical sup- 
plies. Due to phenomenal 
growth, our WAUKEGAN foil- 
ity seeks a dependable, cus- - 
lomcr-orienred go- get I er who 
can excel & grow within a fast 
paced environment. Solid data 
entry & computer skills arc 
essentia!; previous data entry, 
cashier or bank teller experi- 
ence helpful. Win '95, Work 
Plus & Excel experience highly 
preferred. 
To explore or competitive 
salary & benets, send resume 
with salary history lo: 
Medline Industries, Inc. 

HR Dept. SC-DE. 
• One Medline Place 
Mundelein, IL 60060. 
Fax: (847) 949-2109. 
. EOEnVf/d/v 

r . .V..-J 



REFERRAL COORDINATOR 

Lake Forest Pediatrics seeks a f/t. Referral 
, Coordinator to complete referrals for managed" 
care' patients. Candidate should be organized, 
work well Independently, able to work closely 
with physicians and patients and have knowl- 
edge of managed care insurance. Medical termi- 
nology a plusl call Lisa at (847) 295-1 120 or fax 
resume to (847) 295-1255. 



_ V 



C14 / Lakeland Newspapers 



220 



Help Wanted 
Full-Time 



SR. COLLECTIONS 

CREDIT 

ASSOCIATES 

Sec our ad under "Collection!" 
In today's Help Wanted section 

MEDLINE 

r 



EXPERIENCED 

F/T 

DRYWALL 

TAPERS NEEDED 

For Altmann Drywall 

& Painting 

Located in Wauconda 

Must have references. 

40 IK avail, 

Call 

(847) 526-8273 



Meeting Planner/ 
Coordinator PT/FT 

Must be well organized & 

detailed. Good computer 

& phone skills. Positive 

"can do" attitude. 

Occasional travel. 

Experience helpful. 

Libcrtyvillc. 
FAX (847) 247-8230 



Five yr. construction co. 

in iW suburb seeks 

aggressive, ambitious & 

organized 

FT Sales Rep. 

to complement our 

growing sales dent. 
Computer cxp. & plume 
sales a plus, hourly rate 

plus commission & 
benefits. For immediate 

consideration call 
(847)465-4000. Ask for 

Debbie or Angela. 



f> 



n 



COUNSELOR 

Oiil|ulkiil mvni.il kulili i¥?.tm his 

iniiiuih.iii.- n[H-iiMip ill il;v unrj iif 

inlvru-ntlim. nrmtiliiin, AOtW Rrrnin 

In m it. Intiiishv In ■liimiv jm J 
scttiHit-hiscd pnitrjim Ki-nmlw and 
Rjviiiv tjiv.niii-s. EvpwtliH* ttiitklnR 
wllll ji-rlsk ynilh a plus. 
Mm i Mi-klnR an nuliusl wlc 
iiiiliMjii.il in rvvniil uni] llrow 
f. iMvf tllllilio In Kviimll j Oiuniv. 
f-jiulitljk-s .should |iiiml->< voihI 
nillillr MH'Jklni; skill* ami a 
kit fit'lur'f i/v^rtT in a rvlulnl fa-Id. 
Ml (uli i/nif jMsitUms tiffi-r (Miim-li- I 
lliv najjt' and e\cdl«H IkiicW 

pacfafii'. 

1'Ii-j.m.' h\ i»r wnd iw>unu' Hi: 

Hiring AM hit rilv 

Ki-mi>hJ.«li4N2 
fax: il)-f>5l-<i%ii 

l.ijiul Opportunity Emplini-r 



*ME©HA5«* 

Immed. Openlng- 

Decatur, IL UPS Airline 

currently seeks P/T 

Aircraft Mechanic for 

Decatur, ILWereq.2 

yrs heavy |et exp (pref 

Boeing 727, 757, 767, 

747 & DC8). A&P 

LICENSE REQ'D. 

Fax resume: 

Mynlque Davidson 

502-359-7083. 

UPS Is an EEO 



225 



Business 
Opportunities 




Business 
Opportunllcs 



A FUN JOBl 

NOW HIRING 

5 DEMONSTRATORS 

AVERAGE 522/HR. 

FREE GIFT KIT. 

CALL DONNA 

(B47) 395-2395. 

HOME BASED 

AIR & WATER 

PURIFICATION 

S 1,000 + Per week. 

$35 Will Make You a Doalor. 

Call (888)245-5919. 

HUGE PROFITS WE do the 
work and close all sales for 
you. No hype. Just big weekly 
checks. 1 -800-81 1-2141 Code 
07OB71 

www.ts100.com/70871 (SCA 
Network). 

LOG HOME DEALERSHIP: 
'America's Favorite Home," 
sell log home packages, full or 
part-time. Add additional In- 
come to your existing building 
business or start your own 
company. Must purchase or 
sell home starting at 
$19,425.00. Call C.T. McFar- 
land, Southland Log Homes. 1- 
600-845-3555. 

NEW YORK 
STOCK EXCHANGE 

COMPANY 

Sooklng energetic 

self-starters Independent 

representatives. 
The opportunity la real. 

The time Is now. 
For more Information 
about an opportunity In 
one of the world's fastest- 
growing Industries call 
today (847) 358-6180 or 
www.excellr.com/chlp 

UPPER INCOME START 

your own E-commerce busi- 
ness for under $300.00. Com- 
plete training provided. Call 1- 
800-530-3303 between 9am- 
6pm. 

WANTED! 
STAY AT HOME 
MOMS OR DADSI 

If you're currently at home, 

or you'd like to be, we have 

the opportunity for you. 

Work PT/FT around your 

schedule and enjoy unlimited 

Income potential. Be part of 

the nutrition revolution as an 

Independent Roliv Distributor. 

Call for mora Information. 

Scott Pomerance 
Independent Reiiv Distributor 

(847) 945-2481 
MONEY BACK 
GUARANTEE. 

WORK FROM HOME 

PT/FT, $850-$7,200/month. 

Start Immediately. 

Full Training Provided. 

Bonuses-Vacations. 

Free booklet call 

800-606-2188 

www.cash91 1 .cam/future 




PIANO LESSONS 

IN MY LAKE VILLA HOME 

OPENINGS 

Now for students 

6yrs. to adult. 

Over 25yrs. experience. 

REASONABLE RATES. 

(847) 356-2780. 



304 


Appliances 



CLASSIFIED 



August 13, 1999 




$1,250 PER DAYI 

NO SELLING 

NOTMLM 

HOME BASED BUSINESS. 

1-800-882-5044 

CODE #1 68592. w 

"EXCELLENT PROFITS- 
LOG HOME WHOLESAL- 
ERS** Join proven 1 By r. Log 
Manufacturer 16 kiln-dried log 
t. styles, starting $9,600.- Exclu- 
sive territory. Mr. Buck 1-800- 
321-5647, Old Timer Log 
Homes. i 

25 WORDS + 13 MILLION 
HOMES - GREAT RE- 
SULTS. You can market your 
product to 13 million house- 
holds throughout North Ameri- 
ca by placing your classified 
ad In more than 800 suburban 
newspspers, like this one for 
only $895. One phone call, 
one Invoice, one low payment 
Is all It takes. Call the Subur- 
ban Classified Advertising Net- 
work fax-on-demand service 
800-356-2061 or 312-644- 
6610 X4731 to apeak with 
sales coordinator. 



DRYER MAYTAG HEAVY 
duty electric, $150. MI- 
CROWAVE, Panasonic, $50. 
(847) 356-0436. 

GE LARGE CAPACITY 
ELECTRIC DRYER, excel- 
lent condition, $125. (847) 
740-9330. 

WHITE WESTINGHOUSE 
WASHER & ELECTRIC 
DRYER SET, 4/yrs. old, 
$300/best. (414) 554-7146. 




BEANIE BABY SALE 

Sell/Trade 
Best Western Hotel, 

Antloch, IU. 
Saturday, August 14th, 

9am-4pm. 



MONEY 

MONEY 
MONEY 
MONEY 
MONEY 

MONEY 

If you're reading 

this you know 

classified ads work. 

Place yours today. 

Call Lisa 

847.223.8161 




51 Building Materials 



ARCH STEEL BUILDINGS • 
Factory Direct to you, Savo 
$$$$ on select modole Includ- 
ing 20x24, 25x34, 30x36, 
40x58. Great workshops/ga- 
rages. Call now 1-800-341- 
7007. www.steelmastoru- 
sa.com 

STEEL BUILDINGS SALE: 
40x60x14, $9,094. 50x75x14, 
$12,275. 50x100x16, 
$16,879. 60x100x16, $10,281. 
Mini-storage buildings. 
40x160, 32 units, $16,914. 
Free brochures, www.sentlnel- 
bulldings.com, Sentinel Build- 
ings, 800-327-0780. Exlen- 
slon 79. 

STEEL BUILDINGS. FAC- 
TORY Cancellations Sale . 
25x32, 35x60, 40x80, 51x70, 
55x200, 60x100. New Materi- 
als, Still Crated. Selling at in 
voice 1-800-411-5866 Ext. 10 

USED GARAGE DOORS: 
10x11 Wayne Oalton Metal 
with Reg and low cloaranco 
hardware (used 1yr.), $500. 
10x10 wood panel door, $250. 
B'6*x9 roll up metal door, 
$150. Used moial bam siding, 
36 pieces, 30'xi6fi. (approx- 
imately 40sq.ft. each or 
1440sq.ft. total) $12.00 each 
or $400.00 all. One 5- 
1/2*x16ft. wood pole, $20.00 
Evenings (847) 395-6311. 



318 



Business/Office 
Equipment 



INCREASE YOUR SALES 
3OV10O%. TAKE OVER 
LEASE ON PROCESSING 
EQUIPMENT FOR CRED- 
IT CARD SALES. CALL 
CARL (847) 392-4215. 



320 



Electronics 
Computers 



A DISH NETWORK SATEL- 
LITE TV SYSTEM $99. No 
credit checks, monthly pro- 
gramming for only $1 9.99. Call 
t -800-232-2565. 

KISS YOUR CABLE good- 
bye. Only $69, includes IB' 
Dish Satellite System. 40 
channels for $19.99/mo. 
FEDEX deliver. Credit card or 
C.O.D.. Toll Free 1-888-292- 
4836 __ 

NEW INTEL PENTIUM 
400mhz 64 ram, 8.4 gig HD, 
Y2K ready 56K Internet, WIN 
98-t- more, under warranty, 
$595. (773) 782-0700. 

UNLIMITED INTERNET 
ACCESS $9.95. 

56K dial-in- 10 email acounls, 

web accessible email 

personal web page 

NO SETUP FEESI 

ISDN/DSL/Web Hosllng/Co- 

Location also available! 

Sign up on Una 

www.soulhchlcago.net 

Toll tree 1-877-575-8722. 



330 



Garage 
RummafiG Sale 



EM 



1^1 Garage/Rummage 
,J Sale 



THE GLORIOUS DAYS 
OF SUMMER ARE 
COMING. 
The stuff In the garage Is like 
money In the bank. 
Clean out your garage and 
have a garage sale by 
advertising In 
Lakeland, 
Great Lakes Bulletin, 
THE MARKET 
JOURNAL. 
Buy One Week at $19.75 In 

all our papers. 

Get Second Week FREE. 

Must be prepaid on 

Visa, Mastercard or Discover, 

Just one quick phone call 

(647)223-8161 ext. 140 

Will get your ad In for two 

weeks. 

CALLTODAYII 



Garage Sale/Yard Sale 

Make 
MORE $$$ 

at your garage sale, 
yard sate or ilea market. 

EASY MONEY! 

Just distribute our 

fliers at your sale!! 

Call Dan or Geri 

847-244-5690 




GARAGE SALE IB CROSS 
ST., Fox Lake, Thursday 8/12- 
Saturday B/14, 9am-5pm. Dl- 
nlngroom set, stereo equip- 
ment, arts & crafts, and much 
more. 

GARAGE SALE EXCEL- 
LENT quality and, choice of 
baby items, maternity, furni- 
ture and more. Thursday, Fri- 
day, Saturday, 9am-1pm, 649 
Anderson, Lake In The Hills 
(N.W. Hwy. Rt. 14, West to 
Pyott Fid., left, follow signs). 

GARGANTUAN GARAGE 
SALE Saturday, August 14th. 
Clothes, furniture, toots, 
books, miscellaneous house- 
hold Items, sports equipment, 
antique bottle and fruit jar col- 
lection. 5103 N. Arlington 
Heights Rd. (North of Rt. 83), 
In Long Grove, 7am-7pm. 
Park In lower church lot. 

MULTI FAMILY GARAGE 
SALE Saturday B/14, Sunday 
8/15, 7am-4pm. Everything 
must go. 526 Weeping Willow, 
Round Lake, (Bright Meadows 
Subdivision). 

NEIGHBORHOOD GA- 
RAGE SALE August 13th- 
15th., 9am-5pm, Hickory 
Woods Subdivision (Rt. 45 & 
173), Antloch. 

SUMMER BAZAAR AU- 
GUST 21st., llam-4pm, 299 
Oak Ridge Ct„ Antioch. We've 
got It all. 

AFTER YOU'VE HAD 
YOUR BIG SALE, and there 
Is still things that Just did not 
go.... Call us at LAKELAND 
Newspapers and run It 
under the •pREE'or Givea- 
ways" classified column. FREE 
ADS are NO CHARGE! 
(847)223-8161,0X1. 140. 



15.3 OH BUCKSKIN MARE, 
Syrs., broke, very sweet, must 
sell due to addition to family, 
to good home only, $3,000. 
(847) 948-5468. 

16YR. GRADE TENN. 
WALKER MARE. 15.1 H, red 
bay, great looks, good gait. 
Used as brood mare. Intmed. 
rider req. $1,20O/best. (847) 
356-3098 after 6pm. 

APHA '98 TOBIANO 
FILLY, quality built/perfect 
ability, $2,000/best. (815) 
943-7295. 

ARABIAN GELDING, BAB- 
SON Bloodlines, tall, quiet! 
Black Bay, stallion, Babson, 
Muscat bloodlines. Very beau- 
tiful Class A' winner! Others 
available. (414) 635-1063. 

BEAUTIFUL 4YR. BLACK 
Arabian Gelding, broke, very 
gentle. $3,500. (630) 
553-7251 leave message. 

GOOD QUALITY HAY FOR 
SALE, delivered loads of 150- 
500 bales. (B15) 858-2660, 
(847) 922-8773, 

HAY FOR SALE 1st, 2nd & 
3rd cuttings, alfalfa and alfalfa 
grass mix. Excellent quality. 
Days (815) 732-3929. even- 
InflS (815) 738-2250. 

HAY FOR SALE 1st. cutting, 
$2 per bale. Delivery available. 
Call (847) 395-8520. 

HAY FOR SALE. 

Horses love round bales tool 

Excellent quality, 

stored inside, 

prompt on the spot delivery. 
(815) 566-7128. 

HORSE HAY SMALL and 
large bales, excellent quality, 
NO rain. (414) 248-8367. 

HORSES BORDED FIRST 

class facility, Individual turn- 
out, indoor/outdoor, heated, 
etc., excellent care. Richmond, 
III, area (414) 279-3020. 

MORAB/TB FILLY 1998. 
Gruilla with a star. Should ma- 
ture around 16 H.H. Very alh- 
lellcl Will do well in any sport. 
Imprinted P.H.R., $2,000. 
(414) 767-1084 



SADDLE SHOP HORSE 
trailers, Western/English, 
new/used. Cuy, sell, trade. The 
Corral, Sullivan, Wisconsin. 
(414)593-6046. 



STALLS AVAILABLE 

LARGE Indoor arena turn out. 
You feed or we feed. Spring 
Grove area. (815) 675-6100. 

WHEAT STRAW FOR 

SALE, $1.50/bale, (815) 
943-7271,(815)943-5485. 



Attn: Classified 

Advertisers 
Deadlines for ads 

are 10:00 a.m. 

every Wednesday 

Morning. 




Household Goods 
Furniture 



350 


Miscellaneous 



350 



Miscellaneous 



COUNTRY FRENCH Dl- 
NINGROOM SET, all wood, 
Jade wood grain, triple china, 
server, rectangular table, 6- 
cane back chairs, for large 
room. Excellent condition, 
$1,100.(847)487-4279. 

CRIB, SWING, EXER- 
SAUCER, fish tank, truck 
sandbox, plus moro baby 
Stuff. Call (847) 543-1349. 

DARK WALNUT DINETTE 
HUTCH, table with 6-chalrs, 
$300. (B15) 338-9587. 

DESIGNER MODEL 

HOMES FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE! 

Sofa/loveseat set, 
hunter green, $495. 
Sofa, white, $350. 

Sofa/loveseat, 

earth tones, $595. 

Also: Plaids, Florals, 

Leathors and More. 

Dlntngroom sets, 10-plece: 

Cherry, $1,395, 

Mahogany, $2,395, 

Oak $1,695. 

Other sets available. 

Also: Bedroom Sets, 

from $995. 

(847)329-4119. 

www.modBlhomefurniiure.com 

DINING AND DINETTE 
SETS, assorted desks and as- 
sorted light fixtures, grandfa- 
ther clock, armotres and as- 
sorted couches with love- 
seats. By owner. (847) 
438-6997. - 

DININGROOM SET DREX- 
EL Heritage French Provin- 
cial, table, 2-leaves with pads, 
buffet, 2- piece China Cabinet, 
6-Chalrs, $1,500. (847) 
662-3625 after 5pm. 

ENTERTAINMENT CEN- 
TER 4-PIECE oak wall unit 
by Hooker, $3,000/besl. (414) 
681-1347. 

FOR SALE MARBLE DI- 
NINGROOM SET, seats 6. 
$5,550, and other Hems avail- 
able. (847) 729-7805. (414) 
763-7780. 

FURNACE 80,000 BTU, 
5yrs. old, runs great, 
S250/firm. (847) 244-2353. 

MOVING MUST SELL Very 
good condition, bedroom, fa- 
milyroom, organ, mlscollane- 
ous, etc. (847) 587-791 B. 

QUEEN SOFA BED, $100. 
2-book cases, $20/ea. Beige 
5x7 rug, $30. Oak entertain- 
mont center, $35. Sewing ma- 
chine cabinet /work table, $50. 
(847) 487-2289. 

RCA CAMCORDER 

COLOR with battery and 
charger, built-in light, 
$300/best. (847) 263-1646. 

SINGER SEWING MA- 
CHINE, in cabinet, $100. 
Regal food processor, new, 
$40. Changing table, white, 
$60. (414) 884-2722. 

THREE PIECE LIVING- 
ROOM SET, heavy wood 
trim, brown & beige pattern, 
Early American Style, 
$20O/best. (847) 263-1646. 

TV 20IN. COLOR, Sytvanta, 
excellent condition, $75/best. 
Cash only please. (414) 
637-2136. 

THREE NEW WOOD 
DOORS 8Q"x29\ Aluminum 
fluorescent lights. Best offers. 
(847) 566-0990. 

WOOL AREA CARPET, 

8x12, dark rust with black bor- 
der and carved flower design, 
excellent condition. Paid $800, 
asking $350. Beautiful on 
hardwood floors. Also dark 
pine hutch, top tor triple dress- 
er, $75. (647) 625-6551. 



1/4 SCALE RC OFF ROAD 
STADIUM TRUCK, 55CC 2 
stroke Inflatable tiros, 16ln- 
Hx20lnWx42lnL. : Very fast. 
Call for Info (847) 338-6843. 
18 s DIRECTTV SATEL- 
LITE SYSTEMS. Single 
$69.00. Two box systems 
$199.00. 3 months free pro- 
gramming. Free Install kit with 
purchase. Authorized dealer. 
Open 7 days. 1-800-325-7836 
#001 11. (SCA Network). 

BEANIE/COLLECTIBLE 
DISPLAY CASES. Variety of 
sizes, stylos, options. Floor, 
wall, table, travel models. Cat- 
alog $2,00, refundable 
with/purchase, Visa, Master- 
card, (414) B57-2915. P. 0. 
Box253.Somers, Wise. 53171. 

COMPUTE THISI FULLY 
loaded pentium computers 
under $1.00/dayV Purchasel 
Not a teasel Highest quali- 
ty/low rates. America's choice 
computers 1-800-304-5300 
xion www.amcholceeomput- 
ers.com Member BBB *oac 
(SCA Network). 

FOR SALE ARTIFICIAL 7ft. 
Xmas tree, stand, 'ohts, all 
trimmings, $60. Sigma 6-string 
acoustic guitar, est. 1970, $80. 
(847) 973-2764. 

FRIENDLY TOYS & GIFTS 
has openings for party demon- 
strators & managers! Home 
decor, gifts, toys, Christmas. 
Earn cash, trips, recognition. 
Free catalog, Information 1- 

800-488-4675. 

MOTIVATIONAL CAS- 

SETTES, excellent condition. 
Over $500 value. Best offer. 
(847) 516-3425 



SAWMILL $3,785. SAWS 

logs Into boards, planks, 
booms. Urge capacity. Best 
sawmill values, anywhere. 
Freo Information. Norwood 
Sawmills, 252 Sonwll Drive 
#252. Buffalo, NY 14225. 1- 
B00-578-1363. __ 

SPA 4-PERBON SOFTUB 
(Allied), $1,150. Used In/out- 
doors, 110 electric, color 
black. Family Funl (414) 
697-7674. ■ 



STEEL ELECTRICAL 
UGHTINQ POLES, 20ft., 
30ft. & 50ft. long. For Informa- 
tion (847) 742-5559. 



WAVERUNNER 1997 SEA 
000 XP with double trail- 
er, $5,500. Queen size wa- 
terbed frame. $50. Queen size 
soft side waterbed, $150. 
Health Rider, $225. Tunturl 
stepper, $225. 286 computer 
with monitor, $50. 2-alumlnum 
mag rims for 1988 Ford Bran* 
co, $50/ea. (847) 638-4619, 

WOLFF TANNING BEDS. 
TAN AT HOME. Buy DIRECT 
and SAVEI Commercial/home 
units from $199. Low monthly 
payments. FREE color cata- 
log. Call today 1-800-842- 
1310. 



358 



Musical Instruments 



LYON HEALY GRAND PIA- 
NO, reconditioned. (847) 
244-3492. 




R N E R 



348 


Lavm/Gardcn 



"Pulverized Top Soli', 
sand, gravel, holders, mulch, 
wood chips, Bobcat service, 
power washing, snowptowing. 
Delivery wlhln 24 hours. Call 
(647) 244-^125 

417D JACOBSEN TURF 

Cat mower, 60' deck, 52" 
enow-blower, resident use 
only, 550hrs., well maintained, 
(414) 681-1579 after 5pm. - 

LAWN TRACTOR 1996 

John Deere STX38 5 -speed 
trans,, 12hp motor, 38ln. cut, 
great condition, $1,500/best. 
(815)477-0037. 



USED LAWN MOWERS, 
Starting at $40. (847) 740- 
2415. 



1 FULL-TIME, 1 Part-time 
opening. Cowland Home Day 
Care. DCFS liscensed. Wild- 
wood, (647)543-1672. 

ATTENTION MOMSI A 

Round Lake mother Is avail- 
able to watch your child during 
work hours, full/part-time. 
Learning activities, - lunch, 
snacks, naptime and playtime. 
Excellent references. Village 
School District. Call Patti (847) 
740-9415. 

CALLING ALL LAKE 
COUNTY MOM'SIII Bright 
Beginnings Family Day Care 
Network Is looking for nurtur- 
ing, responsible, creative Indi- 
viduals who would like to start 
their own business while stay- 
ing at home with their children. 
If you live In Lake of McHenry 
County and would like assis- 
tance in getting licensed, on- 
going technical assistance, 
and child referrals this pro- 
gram Is for you. For more Infor- 
mation on how to become a 
quality Infant and toddler day 
care provider In your home 
call Dena Thompson at (847) 
356-1021. 

FOX LAKE AREA Mature 
live-in child care needed, 3 
school age kids. Mom with 
Child OK. (847) 397-2282, 
(847) 973-1639. 

GRAYSLAKE STAY AT 
home mom of 2-l/2yr. old girl, 
has 1 full-time opening for 2- 
5yr. old girl, Monday-Friday. 
Please call (84 7j 543-9879. 

HOME DAYCARE FULL or 
part-ilmo, 2yrs. & up, small 
group, Gurnee area, (847) 
856-6384. 

LICENSED LINDEN* 
HURST DAYCAR3E HOME 
AVAILABLE, (or all ages, at 
home mom with child educa- 
tion background, and over 
10yrs. experience, will provide 
loving environment. (847) 
356-6846. 

LOOKING FOR QUALI- 
FIED full-time child care for 
two elementary age children In 
north Llbertyvllte area. Seek- 
ing caring adult who enjoys ac- 
tivities with children. Car and 
valid driver's license needed. 
Cooking and some light 
household cleaning required. 
Additional cleaning available 
for extra Income. Please call 
(B47) 612-2436 and leave 
message. Must have referenc- 
es. ... 

LOVING AND EXPERI- 
ENCED LINDENHURST mom 
available to babysit. Meals, 
snacks and crafts Included. 
Fenced yard. Lake Villa 
School District. Excellent refer- 
ences. (847) 265-6228. 



') 



;: 



LOVING MOTHER WITH 
lots of experience, has 2 open- 
ings In Undenhuret home, for 
ages 4 & up. Before and after 
school also. Meals and snacks 
Included. Call Kathryn (847) 
265-4127. 

MATURE WOMAN f !WANT- I 
ED to care for Infant child in 
our Wadsworth home, flexible 
hours, minimum guaranteed 
salary. References required. 
(847) 336-8298. ' 



MOTHER OF 2 has 2-open- 
Ings in her Round Lake Beach 
home. Large yard, plenty of In- 
door and outdoor activities for 
lots of fun In a small group Bet- 
ting. Any shift welcome. Rea- 
sonable rates. Meals and 
snacks Included. Please con- 
tact Joyce (847) 546-5542. 

MUNDELEIN PROFES- 

SIONAL COUPLE seeking 
mature, loving, creative and 
experienced nanny to care for 
Infant and 3yr. old in our 
home. Needs own transporta- 
tion. Spanish speakers wel- 
come. (647) 566-6379. 

MUNDELEIN STAY-AT- 

HOME mom has 1 full-time 
opening for 3-5yr. old, Mon- 
day-Friday. Dee (847) 
949-0674, 



NANNY NEEDED IMME- 
DIATE full-time live-In, Lake 
Forest/Barrington area. Fluent 
English, $300-$60O/week, 
lyr. commitment. (847) 
277-0320. 



QUALITY CHILD CARE In 

my licensed Round Lake 
homo, full-time, meals and 
snacks Included; Lots of TLC 
and activities. (847) 
546-5699. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH Lov- 
ing mom of 2, has Immediate 
openings for 2+yrs, Meals and 
snacks provided. Fenced 
yard. Close to park. Reason- 
able rates. Alanna (847) 
74CM902. 



SMALL HONfe DAYCARE 

has openings for newborn- 
6yrs. Childcare experience, 
college educated mother of 2 
Educational activities and TLC 
provided, Call Eileen (B47) 
740^3952. ' 

SOMEWHERE OVER THE 
RAINBOW DAYCARE Fall 
openings. Join us for a day of 
play, learning and fun. Limited 
openings. Call (847) 
587-2291. 



:' 
] 



fc 



— 



— 



. It. t '* 



. 




August 13, 19B9 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C15 



360 


Pets & Supplies 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



ARASK9 

PET GROOMING 

Cortifiod Master Groomor. 

Board Cortifiod Qroomor. 

All dogs $20, 

Dog training. 

Cortifiod master trainer. 

Open 7 days 7:30am-6pm. 

After hours by appointment 

(847) 546-1822. 

FOX TERRIER MIX, 

e/MONTHS, 20 lbs., tan with ■ 
white paws, shots, housebro- 
kon with cage, $150. (847) 
367-7233. 

BEAUTIFUL CFA PER- 
SIAN KITTENS, 2-black 

males, 10/weeks old, $250/oa, 
(847) 223-2514. 

BIRD FAIR 

Sunday, August 15th, 

I0am-4pm, 

In the South Hills Country 

Club Banquet Rooms. 

I-94 Frontage Rd. Just 

N. of Highway 20, 

Radne, Wisconsin. 

Donation $1.00. 

Exotic birds of all kinds. 

Cages, feed, accessories, etc. 

Information call Gene 

(414)694-6689. 

DOBERMAN PUPS, AKC, 
champ lines, 'black & rust, 

available 8/8. Raised with 
children. Parents excellent dls- 
posilion. (847} 587-8408. . 

dog sitting 
in my home. 

State licensed. 

Reasonable Rates. 

Call Florence (847) 968-6319. 



DOQ CAQE, 

Z4ln.x24ln., 

548-8605. 



HOME made, 
free. (847) 



DOQ TRAINING-INDIVID- 
UAL DOQ and puppy class- 
es. Dog Supplies . Deja Vue 
Canine Enterprises. (414)' 
694-7391 ore-mail 
de]avueh®lx.netcom,com. 

GERMAN SHORTHAIRED 
POINTER, 1-ma!e, AKC reg- 
islered,' Hold trial lines, vet 
checked, dewormed, shots, 
$300. (847) 587-3130 Mon- 
day-Friday, 9am-6pm. 

GOLDEN - RETRIEVER 
AKC PUPS, shots, wormed, 
$350-$450. (920) 825-7487. 

LAB* PUPPIES 'AKC, first 
shots, dewdaws, parents on 
premises. 2-black, $300.. 
(414) 552-9435, (414) 807- 
7494. 

OLD ENGUSH MASTIFF 
PUPPIES, Champion blood- 
lines, all colore, $1,000- 
$1,500. Ready July 31. (847) 
746-2193. 

PUPPIES FOR SALE 1/2 Si- 
berian Husky, 1/2 Irish Setter. 
Puppies are wormed and have 
1st shots, adorable, $75. For 
more info call (414) 
878-1812. 

ST. BERNARD PUPS, AKC, 
targe boned, vet checked, 1st. 
shots, 8/weeks, $400. (815) 
923-5704. 



364 



Restaurant 
Equipment 




TEN INCH RADIAL 

CRAFTSMAN SAW with 
base and drawers, In good op- 
erating condition, $250/best. 
(847)395-8312. 

TOOLBOX MAC TOOLS, 

Tech 1000, $2,000/besL (414) 
654-8827. - 



370 



Wanted To Buy 



MM MM 

CAMERA'S 

DONT sell at 
Top prices paid 
Canon, Alpa, 
Zeiss, Contax, 
con, Minolta, 
Olympus, etc. 
LECTIBLES 1- 
(SCA Network), 



WANTED! 

garage sale. 

, Letea, Nikon, 

Volghtlander, 

Pentax, Top* 

Hasselblad, 

RITZ i COL- 

800-956-9132 



500 



Homes For Sale 



Slot Machlnts WANTED* 
ANY CONDITION. or 
Parts. Alto JUKE BOXES, 
MUSIC BOXES, Nickelo- 
deon and Coke Machines. 
Paying iCASHI Call 
(630)968-2742. 

WANTED TO BUY 1-10 

acres near m/wisc. border, to 
build storage building, Ask for 
Jarod (414) 662-2517. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



CAPPUCCINO MACHINE, 
COMMERCIAL grade. New 
La SpazlaJe Seletron fully 
auto, one group with grinder, 
cappuccino and espresso 
cups. $1,500 lifetime guaran- 
tee on boiler. (647) 973-6360. 

RESTAURANT' EQUIP- 
MENT WOLF Range, Hoshi- 
zakl Ice Machine. Too many 
items to list (414) 658-6457 
for further details, 



BUYING RETIRED BEAN- 
IE BABIES. Please call Mike 
after 7pm weekdays or all day 
weekends (047)918-0337. 



AFFORDABLE IN GRAYS- 
LAKE Spacious split level du- 
plex, 3-bedrooms, 2-baths, of- 
fice, attached garage. No as- 
sociation feost Many up- 
grades Including: vaulted ceil- 
ings, M or mat cabinets, re- 
cessed lighting, central air, 
fenced yard, 2 -pantries, groat 
closets and storage. 
$127,500. By owner (847) 
54B-O109. 

ALDEN, ILL 5.14 acres, 
totally remodeled 1,900 sq.ft. 
home, 4-bedrodma, 1-3/4 
baths, fireplace, 2.5 car ga- 
rage, .,$197,000. (815) 
646-2960. 

ANTIOGH 26324 SHAN- 
NON AVE. STARTER, OR 
RETIREMENT HOME, 4- 
room, 1 -bedroom, can* be 
made Into 2-bodroom, com- 
pletely remodeled and updat- 
ed, oversized 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage, with full toft, Lakerlghts. 
$108,000/best (847). 
245-8962. ? 

ANTIOCH CUSTOM EXEC- 
UTIVE Brick Ranch, on beau- 
tifully landscaped acre, 4/5 
bedroom, 4-baths, 2-1/2 car 
garage, formal IMngroom/dl- 
ntngroom, famllyroom with 
brick fireplace, designer kitch- 
en with Island, separate eating 
area, lower level with second 
kitchen, bath, famllyroom, 
game room/bedroom, possible 
in-law, $324,900. (847) 
395-1997. 

BEST VALUE IN LAKE 
COUNTY. Round Lake Park 
contemporary, 2-story, 4-bed- 
room, 2.5, baths, 2400sq.ft. ' 
Must see. Full finished base- 
ment, billiard room, glass block 
wet bar. Basement adds 
another l.OOOsq.ft. 7yrs. 
young. $175,000. For Sale By 
Owner. (847) 740-4067. 

BUFFALO GROVE 779 Hor- 
allo Blvd. Beautiful 5+bed- 
rooms, 2.5 baths, 1 acre lot, 
8yre. old, all neutral, hardwood , 
floors, finished basement, 2- 
1/2 car garage, all updated. By 
owner, $506,000. By appoint- 
mertt. (847) 537-8508, 

BURUNQTON TOWN- 
HOUSE 2-UNITS at 
1,850sq.fL each. 3-bedrooms, 
2,5 baths, 2-car attached ga- 
rages, private wooded rear 
yard, will sell one or both. 
5112,000/ea. (414) 
763-6365. 

BY OWNER HERON HAR- 
BOR SUBDIVISION, ANTI- 
OCH 4-bedrooms, 2-1/2 
baths, C/A, largo patio, big 
yard, full basement, $218,000. 
(847) 638-4946. 

BY OWNER LAKE VILLA Im- 
maculate 10yr, old 3 -bed- 
room, cedar home, on 1/2 
acre wooded comer lot Great 
schools, lakerlghts, must see. 
$185,000. (847) 587-6011, 
25220 W. Lincoln Dr. 

BY OWNER- LAKE Villa, 3 
bedroom, 2 bath, quad level, 
Irving room, dining room, eat- 
In kitchen, family room, central 
air, fireplace, fenced yard, pa- 
tio, attached garage, 2.5 car, 
close to Metra. (847) 
356-6828 ■ 

CASTLE DUPLEX FOR 
SALE BY OWNER, 634 Nip- 

perslnk, 5-bodrooms, 2-kitch- 
ens, 3-baths, 2-dlnIngrooms, 
2-ltvlngrooma, 1-sunroom, 
large basement, 3-car garage, 
2-1/2 acres. Open House Sun- 
days 2pnv5pm. First 
$230,000 or best offer over 
$220.000 buys 9/1 3. 

COZY , 2-BEDROOM 

CEDAR sided ranch with 2- 
: car tandem heated attached 
garage with automatic door, 
* updated throughout, move-In 
" condition, all appliances stay, 
excellent neighborhood, moti- 
vated sellers, $93,500. West 
Mlltmore Subdivision, 36902 
N. Carol Ln.. Lake Villa. (847) 
265-6725, 

DIAMOND LAKE LAKE- 
FRONT 4-bedroom. 2.5 bath 
home. Many special features, 
Four season recreation. 
$389,900. (647) 566-7768. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



DREAMS DO COME 
TRUE! House For Sale By 
Owner. 9210 393rd, Ave,, 
Powers lake; Knolls, Wiscon- 
sin. Newer raised ranch on 
wooded comer lot. Beautifully 
landscaped, 3-bedrooms, 2- 
full baths (1 with whirlpool 
tub), famllyroom with oak man- 
tle fireplace, faundryroom, 
large eat-In kitchen with all ap- 
pliances, high efficiency fur- 
nace with central air, 200amp 
service, 2-car garage, 
12ft.x12tt. deck off kitchen, 
concrete drive next to house 
for RV/boat Plus 16x32 patio 
behind house. 10x14 bam 
shod enclosing 4ft. cyclone 
fenced yard. All this for only 
$160,000, No Brokers. Please. 
Call Ray at (414) 279-5397. 

ELK GROVE BY OWNER 5- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, living- 
room, dlningroom, famllyroom 
With fireplace, $259,900. (847) , 
524-2730. .. 

FIFTY ACRES WITH house 

on Prairie' River in beautiful 
wooded area near Merrill, Wls- 
COnsln. (715)538-3011. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 
1400sq.ft all brick ranch with- 
3-bedrooms, attached ga- 
rage, recrbom In basement. 
Within walking distance of St, 
Man/a Hospital. Asking 
$120,000. (414) 376-6053 for 
more info. 

REDUCED! BY OWNER 
FOX LAKE 2-story, 2-bed- 
room, 1-1/2 bath, kitchen pan- 
try, . Ilvingroom/dinlngroom, 
utilityroom, 2-1/2 car garage, 
$117.900. (847)973-2717. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 
ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 
bedrobm ranch, 1-bath, eat-In 
kitchen, full basement with fa- 
mllyroom, central air, gas fire-, 
place, all appliances, celling 
tans, skylights, patio door to 
decks. 3-biocks from Beach 
Elementary School, 2-1/2 car - 
heated garage with workshop. 
Ready to move In. Call for ap- 
polntment. (847) 546-1544. 

FORTY ACRES, LARGE 4- 

bedroom, 3-bath home, office 
space or extra bedroom with 
living area. 2- natural fire- 
places, 2-large pole bams,, 
horses OK, $330,000. (414) 
878-3487. " ~ 

FOUR BEDROOM, 2- 
BATH brick ranch on 1+acro. 
Newfy remodeled kitchen, 
$184,800. Call for details after 
6pm weekdays or leave mes- 
sage anytime (847) 
223-6746. 

FOX LAKE 2-BEDROOM 1- 

bath lakefront house, ihr. 
from Chicago on private Is- 
land. Boat access only. Beauti- 
ful view of Meyers Bay. 
$99,900. (815) 363-1449, 
(647) 587-9476, 

FOX LAKE BY OWNER 
New 3/99. Raised ranch, 3- 
bedroom, 2-1/2 bath, 2-1/2 ga- 
rage, sod, deck, woodbumlng 
fireplace, A/C, cathedral cell- 
ing. $190K/negotlable. (847) 
587-4222, 

QRAYSLAKE - 3 bed- 
rooms, 2 baths, finished family 
room, fireplace, hardwood 
floors, Berber carpeting. 
Large woodsy lot. Walktohlg- 
school. Reduced to $154,900. 
Call (847) 543-1023 for ap- 
polntmenL 



QRAYSLAKE 3- BED- 

ROOM, 1.5 bath colonial on 
cul-de-sac, eat-In kitchen, fire- 
place, C/A/C, large yard wHh 
deck, $146,900. (847) 
543-4008. 



QRAYSLAKE AREA 
(MINUTES TO DOWN- 
TOWN QRAYSLAKE. At- 
tractive 3yr. new subdrvislon.- 
Beautlful 2-story, 4BD, 2.5BA, 
2088sq.ft. home featuring a 
spacious iMngroom & family- 
room, separate dlningroom, 
targe eat-In kitchen, partially 
finished basement, 2-car ga- 
rage, fenced yard that backs 
to nature area. Walk to future 
park and reo area. Close to 
shopping. (Grayslake 
Schoolsllll) 9109,700. Will 
Co-op at 2%. For appoint- 
mint or Information call 
(847)546-6383. 

GURNEE 2-STORY ALL 
brlck> and stucco, 2-car at- 
tached garage, 6-bedrooms, 
4-baths, famllyroom, formal dl- 
ningroom, oak staircase and. 
trim, 2 masonry fireplaces, 
laundryroom, full basement. 
Very attractive home In nice lo-' 
cation, $335,000. (647) 
623-2870. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



GURNEE 3-BEDROOM, 1- 
1/2 bath ranch, central air, up- 
dates Include: new water heat- 
er, roof, vinyl siding, Berber 
carpet, tile floors, new paint, 
all white appliances will stay, 
60x1 60ft tree lined yard, 1- 
1/2 car garage. Realtors wel- 
come at 3%. $128,500. (847) 
285-9002. 

GURNEE FSBO, 
$152,500, 3-bedrooms, 1' 
1/2 baths, fenced back yard, 
will pay your moving expens- 
es. Details call - (847) 
073-1193. 

GURNEE LOVELY 3-BED- 
ROOM, 2-1/2 bath, updated 
kitchen, basement, attached 2- 
car garage, 1B00sq.fl., ap- 
pliances and more. In quiet 
neighborhood. Pre-approved 
and no contingencies. 
$185,000. (647) 336-6607, 

GURNEE Adorable. 1/2 acre 
wooded, mature perennials, 
low taxes, 3-bedrooms, 2- 
baths, 2-1/2 detached garage, 
$179,900. (847) 244-3422. 

GURNEE UPDATED TRI- 
LEVEL, walk to schools, DIs- . 
trict 56. Now floors, deck, C/A, 
fenced yard, $165,000. (647) 
263-6036. .,..-.. ■ 

HOME FOR SALE BY 
OWNER AntlochI Great loca- 
tion, close to schools and 
shopping, quiet cul-de-sac, 
maintenance free brick ranch, 
all exposed areas clad In alu- 
minum. 2-large bedrooms, 2- 
balhs (1 -handicapped), IMng- 
room/dlningroom, laundry- 
room, attached garage, large 
yard. This home is Immacu- 
late. Immediate possession. 
Just reduced to $145,900. 
(847) 356-2417. 

HOUSE FOR SALE 3-bed- 
room, 2-story, full, basement, 
new 2-1/2 car attached ga- 
rage on 2 lots, furnace, and 
C/A 1yr. old, 2yr. old siding, 
new deck. $119,000. (414) 
878-9709. 



INGLESIDE BY OWNER 3- 
bedroom raised' ranch, 1- 
bath, tower level finished with 
natural stone fireplace and 
wet bar, outside entrance, 
deck, C/A, appliances stay, 2- 
car garage with 15fLx20fL ad- 
ditional wo rk , , area v , Fenced 
rear yard and storage shod. 
$125,000. Option on adjacent 
60fU1 15ft. side lot, $25,000. 
(847) 546-3745. __ 

ISLAND LAKE WEST- 
RIDGE SUBDIVISION 

Newer beautiful ranch, 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-baths,. famllyroom, 2- 
car garage, deck, large yard, 
neutral decor, $159,900 
(847) 487-4279. . 

JUST REDUCED QAGES 
Lake For Sale by owner. Lak- 
erlghts, 3 -bed room, 1-bath 
ranch, low taxes, new carpet, 
ready to move In, deck on 
front, screened porch on 
back, 1-1/2 car garage, 
$1 1 1 ,500, (B47) 223-1926. 

KENOSHA (PLEASANT 
PRAIRIE) 10509 50th Ave., 
Quality built 2-story, 3-bed- 
room, 4-bath, master suite 
with spa,- vaulted ceilings, first 
floor laundry, C/A, finished 
basement, 1.2 acres, quiet 
dead-end, minutes from I- 
94/111. border. $184,900. (414) 
697-1699. 

KENOSHA, WISCONSIN 3- 
BEDROOMS, 2-1/2 car ga- 
rage, new wlnd- 
ows/doors/roof, large lot and 
spa, $128,000. (414) 
694-0170. 



LAKE BLUFF 4-BED- 
ROOM, 3-bath, 29732 But- 
teryfly Ct, finished walk-out 
basement, on premium lot. 
$375.000. (647) 735-6189. 

LAKE VILLA 3-BED- 

ROOM, 2- bath quad level on 
2-lots, 2-car garage, above 
ground pool, room off deck 
with hot tub, lakerlghts to 
Chain, $169,900. (647) 
356-6363. ■ 

LAKE VILLA NEWER raised 
ranch, 3-bedrooms, 2-baths, 
C/A, fireplace, cathedral ceil- 
ings, comer of Genoa and 
Granada, Lake Villa. 
$155.900. (847) 356-2506. 

LAKELAND IS OPEN 

24 HOURS 

If you need to place an ad In 

Classified, call us at 

(847) 223-6161 ext 140 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

tax our 24-hour fax line at 

(847)223-2691. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



LEASE PURCHASE LIN- 
DENHURST, only $3,000 
down, buys beautiful brick and 
vinyl aided, 2-sto ry, 4-bed- 
room, 2-1/2 bath, famlryroom 
with fireplace, dlningroom, 
basement, 2-car garage, only 
2yrs. old, $1,600/month plus 
Utilities, $196,000. (847) 
223-6269.' __ 

LIBERTYVILLE 415 

WRIQHTWOOD, 

$139,900/best. 2-bedrooms, 
i-bath, 2-1/2 garage, large 
fenced yard, close to every- 
thing, (647) 673-9235. 

LIBERTYVILLE 423 AMES 
Owner financing possible, 3- 
bod rooms, 1-1/2 baths, ga- 
rage, $224,900. .- (647) 
362-2633. 

UNDENHUR3T COUN- 

TRY PUCE BY OWNER 2- 
story townhouse, beautiful ly 
decorated, neutral cotors, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, wfth 
loft, IMngroom with fireplace, 
large kitchen with nook, all ap- 
pliances, many upgrades, at- 
tached 2-car garage, 2*1/2yrs. 
Old. (847) 265-2163. 

(JNDENHURST LAKE- 

FRONT PROPERTY NEW 
CONSTRUCTION CUS- 

TOM BUILT HOME 4-bed- 
room, full basement, formal 
living and dlningroom, family- 
room with fireplace, large 
kitchen with Island, master 
suite features whirlpool tub 
and cathedral ceiling, 2-story 
foyer, hardwood floors, 9ft. 
ceilings, close to forest pre- 
serve, $329,000. (647) 
356-0962. 

MUNDELEIN HIGH VIS- 
IBILITY location, excellent 
commercial potential, located 
on major thoroughfare, 
880sq.fl, 50fLx150fL site, 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath, full, unfin- 
ished basement, 1-car de- 
tached garage, new roof, new 
bath, all new insulated wind- 
ows, new furnace, new C/A/C, 
modem kitchen, 0.6ml. to Me- 
tre. $130,000. (647) 
949-5327. 

MUNDELEIN/LOCH LO- 

MAND.BY OWNER, 3-bed- 
room remodeled ranch, with 
finished basement, 1 -block 
from private beach, $169,900. 
... (847) 566t6042. 

NEAR GURNEE, ILLINOIS 
BY OWNER Immaculate 4- 
bedroom, 25 bath, loft, base- 
ment, bar, fireplace, C/A; 
deck, fenced rear. $198,000. 
$12,000 below market. (647) 
816-3798. Realtor gets In July. 
Possible owner financing. 

PETITE LAKE CHANNEL 
FRONT HOME on 3 lots, 2- 
bedroom, 1-bath, air, fire- 
place, 2-1/2 car garage, hot 
tub In large deck, all applianc- 
es Included, very own boat 
ramp. $187,000. (847) 
838-6008. ' 

RARE OPPORTUNITIES 

PEORIA AREA 

3-bedroom. 1 .5 bath home on 

5-acres. Priced below 

appraisal. 50x28 out building, 

$124,682. 

4-BEDROOM, 2-BATH 

HOUSE 

ON 20 ACRES. 

Hunter & Fishermans 

Paradise, (deal for horses 

bam & fenced pasture, 

stocked pond, $224,971 . 

Carousel Realtors, 

Steve Caldwell 

. 1-6 00-511-6255, 

RONDOUT, ILLINOIS. UN- 
INCORPORATED, secluded 
neighborhood of older homes. 
2-large bedroom, 1-bath bun- 
galow/dean, newly updated 
with wood trim, berber carpet 
and ceramic tile, newer cabi- 
nets and windows, basement, 
heated 2.5 car garage. Wood- 
ed, fenced, .44 acre, back 
yard nature preserve, bet-. 
ween Lake Bluff and Lambs 
Farm off RL 176. Metre, toll- 
way, good schools, low taxes, 
sewer and water. Below ap- 
praisal for quick sale . at 
$150,000. Call for showing 
(847) 970-0125. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH - For 

sale by owner. No bank fi- 
nancing neccessary, Only 
$4,500 down. 3 bedroom, 2 
bath. Split level. Fireplace In 
family room. 2 car garage. 
Call (630) 375-7442 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 

i*409 June way Terrace -2- 
story, 4-bedroom, 1,5 bath, 
eat-In kitchen, large laundry- ' 
room with storage space, very 
dean, move-In condition, 2.5 
car garage with attached 
shed, drive by and get Infor- 
mation sheet out of box locat- 
ed In front yard, $110,900. 
(847) 838-4356, 



ROUND LAKE BEACH 231 

Wildwood Dr., 3-bedroom W- 
level, bunt 1992, great condi- 
tion, early closing bonus, 
broker co-op, $107,500. (847) 
646-6947. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 3- 

bedroom ranch, 2-fuii baths, 
full finished basement, nicely 
landscaped, deck off bed- 
room, shed, fenced yard. Lots 
of added extras, $103,900. 
(847) 740-3350. 

ROUND LAKE PARK Excep- 
tionally nice 3-bodroom, 2.5 
bath, plus loft, bright and airy, 
9ft. ceilings main floor, many 
upgrades, boat slip, $179,500. 
(847) 546-7090. 

ROUND LAKE 
TOWNHOUSE 

2-bodroom 2-bath, 
recent construction. 
Price Reduced to $107,900. 
Special financing available. 

277 Treehouse Ln. 
C21 (773) 506-2121. ext 32 

SOUTHSIDE 3-BEDROOM 
RANCH, with recroom In 
basement, newer carpeting In 
IMngroom, hardwood floors in 
bedrooms, oversized garage. 
Many extras. (414) 694-6896 
for appointment 

SPRINQ GROVE WATER- 
FRONT, nice 1 -bedroom cot- 
tage with fireplace, also large 
fenced-in backyard,. plus boat 
dock, owner financing, 
$89,900. 25% down, 
$750/montru (847) 088-2078. 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKE- 
LAND CLASSIFIED ADS 
ON THE INTERNET! Visit 
http://www.lpnews.com/ to 
place your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internet, In 
all Lakeland Papers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only $19.75 
for 15 words, then 15* each 
additional word. 

THREE' BEDROOMS, 2- 

1/2 baths, 2-car attached ga- 
rage, park like, lot, 1 acre, 
2800sq.fL (847) 623-3105, 

TWO BEDROOM, 1- 
BATH, 1400sq.fL home, hot 
tub, 2-1/2 acres, 3401L river 
frontage, on Wisconsin River. 
Just 15 minutes North of the 
Dells. $120,000. (608) 
," 339-9527. . ... .. 

VA/HUD REPOS! 

New lists weakly. 
Call Ryan & Co., Realtors 
■Your Repo Specialist*.* 

(047)526-4300. 



VERNON HILLS 
PATH 4-bedrooms, 
2.5 ..car garage, 
floors, many recent 
excellent family 
hood/schools, 
(847)660-3652. 



DEER- 

2.5 baths, 
hardwood 
upgrades, 
neighbor- 
$225,900. 



VINTAGE BEAUTY, 
GREAT Waukegan neighbor- 
hood, 3-bedrooms, hardwood 
floors and trim, fireplace', cen- 
tral air, $134,900. (847) 
662-5942. _____ 

WATER RIGHTS ON PIS- 
TAKEE LAKE, CROCHETT 
ESTATES, 8-room ranch, 3- 
bedrooms, 2-baths plus taurt- 
dryroom, all newly remodeled, 
attached healed garage, low 
maintenance yard and shed, 
recent updates Include: new 
furnace, new appliances. Must 
sell, $117,500.' (847) 
587-6452. 



WAUCONDA 3-BED- 
ROOM, 1-1/2 bath. hard-. 
wood floors, interior updates, 
lake/beach rights, needs exte- 
rior updating. $112,400. (647) 
526-1699. ' 

WAUCONDA FOR SALE by 
owner, 4-bedroom, 2-1/2 bath. 
Call for Info. Days (647) 298- 
0302, evenings ' (647) 
526-4522, ask for Mike, 

WAUCONDA NEW, COM- 
PLETELY remodeled, laker- 
lghts. Immediate occupancy, 
$139,900. (847) 878-2358. 
(647)526-8273. 

WAUKEGAN 1701 PAR- 
TRIDGE, 3-bedroom, totally 
rehabbed. full basement,. A/C, 
$99,000. OPEN HOUSE SUN- 
DAY -1pm-3pm. ; (847) 
662-6614, (647) 334-6614. 

WAUKEGAN BY OWNER 
(320 Center Street), 2-story 
house in Historic section. .3- 
bed rooms, ' 1.5 baths, living- 
room, dlningroom, deck,, 
fenced yard, cabana,^' fire- 
place, basement; • 1 -car ga- 
rage. Includes: washsc/dryer, 
dishwasher and . stove. 
$105,000 or best reasonable 
offer, Call (647) 625-0521 for 
showing. 



500 



Homes For Sale 



WHY RENT-OWN, OR 

LEASE TO OWN Lake living 
without the cost Easement to 
Fox Lake across the street. 
Subdivision beach and park. 
Great view. Landscaped, new 
central air, roof, windows, etc, 
throughout home. AD the hard 
work is done. Move In and 
enjoy today. $119,060 pur- 
chase or lease for $975.00 per 
month (with option to buy). 
Contact Ken HoxJc at (847) 
284-9234. 

WINTHROP HARBOR 4- 
BEDROOMS, great location, 
many ' updates, $155,000. 
(847) 746-6651 after 6pm. 

WINTHROP HARBOR, 

CUSTOM 4-bedroom ranch, 
2-1/2 baths, 3-car garage, fire- 
place, finished basement, 
large fenced yard, $239,000. 
(847)746-7340. - 

ZJON BY OWNER Charming 
3-bedroom, 3-bath, fireplace, 
2-car, nice neighborhood, 
across from park, $129,000. 
(647)672-5164. 

SON CUTE 3-BEDROOM, 

hardwood floors, big base- 
mem, large yard, perfect In- 
vestment home, 7% assum- 
able. (708) 598-0858. 



m 



Gov't 

Foreclosure 

Sate 



P 



Grayslake, Waukegan, Zion, 
Round Late & other 
surrounding areas. 
From $49,000 & up. [j 
Low Down/Make Offer j 
Western Realty J 
630-495-6100 A 




FOX LAKE NEW HOME 3- 

bedrooms, 2-baths, family- 
room, 1-car garage, A/C, ap- 
pliances, skylights, 

$1 ,275/month plus utilities, no 
pets. (647) 526-0598. . . 

GRAYSLAKE 

3-bedroom, 2-bath, 

newty decorated home, 

garage, C/A, appliances. 

No pete. 

a/tnorrths seourtry, 

$1,175/montfL 

(847)362-6600. 

GRAYSLAKE AREA 

NEWER 

3-bedroom, 2-story home 

overlooking fen. 

Freshly painted, 

new carpeting, eat-In kitchen, 

C/A, basement, 3-car garage. 

No pets/no smoking, 

$1,450/montti 

(847) 546-3295. 

GURNEE 6252 FOR- 
MOOR, Cambridge Home 
surrounded by golf course, 4- 
bedrooms, 3-1/2 baths, 2-car 
garage, 4yrs. old. No pets. 
$2,500/month. (847) 

675-6927. (847) 675-2004. 

HOME FOR RENT IN FOR- 
EST LAKE, reasonable, can 
(414) 275-3218. 

LAKE VILLA 2-STORY, 3- 

large bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths, 
huge kitchen with appliances, 
dlningroom, IMngroom with 
fireplace, English basement, 
master suite with skylights and 
whirlpool, 2-car garage, large 
fenced yard, Lake- Villa - 
Schools, $1,600/month. (847) 
265-9514. ■ 

FOX LAKE HILLS, LAKE 
VILLA Country Living' In re- 
modled house on 2 acres on. 
Fox Lake, Private beach, 4- 
bedrooms, 3-baths, eat-ln- 
krtchen, large bar. Pets 'ok". 
$1,500/month. Call. (847) 
587-6810. 



LEASE PURCHASE UN- 
DENHURST, only $3,000 
down, buys beautiful brick and 
vinyl sided, 2-story, 4-bed- 
room, 2-1/2 bath, famiryroom 
with fireplace, dlningroom, 
basement, 2-car garage, onfy- 
2yrs- oU, $1,6O0/month plus 
Utilities, $196,000. (847) 
223-6269. 

SALEM,. WISCONSIN 

YEARLY tease, semi-fur- 
nfshad, $72S/month plus ae- . 
curtty deposit No pets. Avail- 
able September 1st. Referenc- 
es. Can for appointment (704) 
489-0324, 

WAUCONDA.. 35008Q.FT. 
EXECUTIVE ranch overlook- 
ing a 75 acre horse farm, 
pond and 2 acres of lawn, 
$1 ,900/month. LB. Anderson 
& Co. (847) 381-9060. 



j 



, 






# 



C1 6/ Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



504 



Homes For Rent 



ROUND LAKE 

Walk to the train! 

1 BR Duplex - 

2nd Floor. 

No garage. 

Long Term Lease. 

$475/mo + 

utilities & 

sec dep. 

Land Management 

815-678-4334 



514 



Condo/Town Homes 



ALGONQUIN/BARRING- 
TON BRAND NEW deluxe 2- 
bedroom, 2-bath townhome, 
fireplace, A/C, 1-car garage, 
upper ranch unit, Including 
greatroom, deck, yard. Lake 
Cook Rd & Algonquin Rd„ 
$139,900 or offer, (847) 
4B7-4279. 

ANTIOCH TOWNHOUSE 
ALMOST NEW 2-bedroom, 1- 
1/2 bath, 2-car garage, 
$1.055/monlh. (847) 272* 
5200, pager (847) 501-9200, 
home (847) 509-7422. 

CONDO FOR SALE Vaca- 
tion Village, Fox Lake, 1-bed- 
room Clipper, pool, marina, 
security gate, S39,ooo/bost. 
(647)587-1109. 

FOR SALE BY OWNER 3- 
bedroom lownhoms In Grays- 
lake, 2-car garage, newer car* 
petlng, freshly painted Interior 
and exterior, finished base- 
ment with laundryroom, walk 
to town, shopping and trains, 
597,000. (847) 204-1300 
leave message. 

FOX LAKE FURNISHED 2- 
bedroom, 1-balh lakefront 
condo, garage, 9/month lease 
only, 5650/month, (847) 
426-4312. 

GREAT LOCATION 
SEVEN minutes to Baxter, 10 
minutes from Gurnee Mills, 2 
minutes to 1-94. Gurnee 
Schools. Sparkling 2-bed- 
room, 1.5 bath townhouse is 
better than new. Built 1995. 
Open lloor plan, spacious 
kitchen, neutral decor, custom 
window treatments, oak rail- 
ings, celling fan In master bed- 
room and dining area. Backs 
to common area with sliders 
off of large llvlngroom. Con- 
venient 2nd floor laundry- 
room, storage shelves In at- 
tached garage. Upgraded 
Lennox central air. Excellent 
neighborhood wilh park. Sep- 
tember occupancy. At the Vil- 
lage at Pleasant Hill. Off 
O'Plaine Rd., between Rt. 120 
& 137. For more info: Betsy 
(847) 473-6264 days, (847) 
249-7680 evenings. 

GURNEE CONDO, STO- 
NEBROOK, 2-bedroom, 2- 
1/2 car garage, fireplace, 
cathedral ceilings, appliances 
Included, 5 minutes from Toil- 
way, $115,000. (847) 
856-8233. 

LIBERTYVILLE AVAIL- 
ABLE NOW Newly renovated 
3-bedroom, 1-1/2 bath towen- 
home, full basement, no pets, 
$1,190/month. (847) 
680-1755. 

ROUND LAKE BEACH 
townhouse, 3-bedrooms, 1- 
1/2 baths, garage, pool. De- 
posit and references needed. 
S765/month plus utilities. Avail- 
able September 25th. (847) 
546-7488. 

THREE BEDROOM TOWN- 
HOME Gurnee, near tollway, 
2-1/2 bath3, A/C, 2-car ga- 
rage, 51,200/month. Available 
September 1st. (847) 
662-1746 evenings or leave 
message. 

TOWNHOME IN HOFF- 
MAN ESTATES, close to high- 
way, school and library, 2-bed- 
rooms, 1-1/2 balhs, $91,000 
below appraised vaiua. (847) 
973-0992. 

VERNON HILLS TOWN- 
HOUSE FSBO, 3-bedroom, 1- 
car altached garage, new car- 
pet, all appliances included, 
excellent condition, great loca- 
tion next to playground. 
Hawthorn Schools. $96,900. 
(847) 680-7632. 

WAUCONDA LAKE- 

FRONT, 2-bedroom, gor- 
geous vlewa, move-In condi- 
tion, sandy beach, pool, boat 
slip, $81,500. (847) 

526-7024. 

WAUKEGAN CONDO FOR 

SALE, 1 -bedroom, 2-car ga- 
rage, low association, clean, 
appliances, great location, 
A/C, $57,000. (847) 578-6838 
leave message. 



518 



Mobile Homes 



14X70 FAIRMONT MO- 
BILE home in Beach Park, lL 
3 bedrooms, 2 baths, fire- 
place, deck. Asking $23,900, 
negotiable. 

1989 MARATHON MO- 
TORHOME 24', 5.7 liter en- 
gine, sloops 6, bed In back, 
only 37,000 miles, Excellent 
condition. (414) 534-4553 

1989 MOBILE HOME Very 
nice, 2-bedrooms, 2-baths, 
shed, alt appliances, C/A, lo- 
cated In new park near Great 
America, $18,500. Call any- 
time, (847) 244-8720 or (847) 
838-1965. 

1992 14X70 MANUFAC- 
TURED HOME, 3-bedrooms, 
1 -bath, nice size yard, 
$25,000 with $1,000 rebate. 
(647) 740-8519. 

1999 40FT. FIFTH WHEEL 
TRAILER, self-contained, 2- 
sllde-outs, 2-bedrooms, wash- 
er/dryer, 2-A/C's, awning, 
more, $24,000. (815) 
341-6451. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING 
OVER 55 COMMUNITY. 

1995 1-bdroom, 1-balh, 

wilh shed, 
$29,900. 

1996 2-bedroom, 2-balh, 
with garage and hobbyroom, 

$49,900. 

1988 2-bedroom, 2-bath, with 

carport, deck and shed. 

$39,900. 
1995 2-bedroom, 2-balh, 
with garage and carport, 

$56,900. 

1988 2-bedroom, 2-bath 

with deck and shed, 

$40,900. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 

MARSHFIELD 2-BED- 
ROOM, ALL APPLIANC- 
ES, AIR, NEW vinyl siding, 
shed, new carpet. In retire- 
ment park, age 55. $8,900. 
(414) 694-0164. 

MOBILE 1990 CARROLL- 
TON Double wide, Kenosha, 
newly carpeted, air, 3-bed- 
rooms, 2-baths, natural fire- 
place, deck, shed, $41,500. 
(414) 552-7666. 

MOBILE HOME 'LIKE 
camping year round' 2-bed- 
rooms, on large lot, wooded 
park, walk to silver Lake, re- 
modeled. (414) 889-8233. 

MOBILE HOME 12X48, 
newly decorated, stored In Elk- 
horn, Wise. Must sell, 
53.750/besl. (708) 453-5946. 

MOBILE HOME 16X80 2- 
bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, covered 
deck and carport. Rainbow 
Lake Manor, adult park, 
$50,000. (847) 395-3585. 

MODULARS - DOU- 
BLEWIDES - SINGLEWIDES 
- ILLINOIS LARGEST DIS- 
PLAY OF MODEL HOMES. 
FOUNDATIONS, BASE- 
MENTS, GARAGES, SEPT- 
ICS - WE DO IT ALLII FREE 
STATEWIDE DELIVERY/IN- 
STALLATION. RILEY MANU- 
FACTURED HOMES 1-800- 
798-1541. 

NORTH AMERICAN 1990 
MOBILE HOME, 2-bedrooms, 
2-balhs, fireplace, deck and 
awning. Close to Interstate. 
$3,500/best. (414) 884-8723. 

OAKDALE ESTATES 
HWY. KR & 1-94, Kenosha. 
1988 North American, 16x80, 
2-bedrooms, central air, shed, 
deck, all appliances Included, 
attractive tot, $32,900. (414) 
679-0079. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Located in an over 55 

community. 

1 -bedroom, 1 -bath, 

$595/month plus securitry. 

2-bedroom, 1-1/2 bath, 

S695/monlh plus security. 

All Include: washer/dryer 

facilities, off street parking, 

cable TV and shed. 

Available September 1st. 

No pets. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 



520 



Apartments For Rem 



ANTIOCH 2-BEDROOM 

APARTMENT, in town, 
$715/month, Includes cook- 
ing gas, hot water, heat, sew- 
er, water, garbage, snow re- 
moval, tenant pays electric, 
Navy just moved out. No 
cats/dogs. (847) 395-0707. 

APARTMENT FOR RENT 

Large 3-bedroom spacious 
apartment, large yard, near 
naval base. More Information 
call Ruth (847) 688-0847. 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



520 



Apartment For 
Rent 



DEERFIELD AVAILABLE 
NOW, 1 -bedroom, 2nd floor 
house, near train, Includes 
heat, $750/monlh + security. 
(847) 267-0391. 

FOX LAKE AREA, ON RT. 
134, Newer 2-bedroom, 2nd 
floor, no pets, $705/monlh. 
(847) 297-5018, 

FOX LAKE BEAUTIFUL 1- 
bd., 4-rooms. RL 12/Chan- 
nel/Metra, $650/month 4 se- 
curity, and credit check. (708) 
788-5564. 

GRAYSLAKE APART- 
MENT, 1-BEDROOM, Spa- 
clous, good neighborhood, 
laundry facilities. Security de- 
posit plus references. No pets. 
Available 8/15. $635/month. 
(847) 223-0022. 

GRAYSLAKE DUPLEX 
WITH single attached ga- 
rage, 3-bedrooms, 2-baths, 
A/C, $950/month with $1,500 
security deposit. NO PETS! 
(847)223-5301, 

GURNEE/WAUKEGAN 
NORTH SHORE 
APARTMENTS 

At Affordable Prices. 

Spacious. 

Luxury Living. 

Elevators. 

On Site Staff. 

Good Location. 

Easy to Toll Roads. 

IMPERIAL TOWER/MANOR. 

(847) 244-9222. 

LAKE VILLA 1-BEDROOM 

apartment, utiltles included, 
heated garage, security re- 
quired. No pets. S600/month. 
(847) 672-3687. 

LAKEVIEW TERRACE 
APARTMENTS LAKE VIL- 
LA, Large 1 & 2 bedrooms, 
S645-$760/month. Heat, wa- 
ter, air included. (847) 
356-5474. 

LIBERTYVILLE 905 MIL- 
WAUKEE, 2-bedroom, 2- 
bath, washer/dryer, C/A, 
$925/monlh plus security. Lov- 
Inger Real Estate (847) 
244^4220. 

NEAR NORTH WAUKE- 
GAN, 1 -bedroom apartment, 
safe, quiet neighborhood. His- 
torical Building, S480./month. 
(847) 244-^1260. 



WAUCONDA 1-BEDROOM 
APARTMENT, remodeled, 
heat and hot water includod, 
$585/month plus security de- 
posit and lease, no pets. Avail- 
able immediately. (847) 
433-0891. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 

WALK TO EVERYTHING 

Locotod In an 

over 55 community. 

1 -bedroom, 1-bath, Includes 

all utilities, 5625/month. 

Available Immediately. 

Studio aportmonts, 

all utilities Included, 

$525-$610/month, 

Available September 1st. 

■ BEAUTIFUL 

LARGE STUDIO, 
with attached garage, 

$795/monlh. 

Available October 1st. 

No pets. 

Security deposit required. 

(847) 526-5000 

leave message. 

WAUCONDA IN TOWN 
WALK TO EVERYTHING, Lo- 
cated In an over 55 communi- 
ty, 1 -bedroom, 1-bath, In- 
cludes: all utilities, Including 
cable TV, $825/month plus se- 
curity. No pets, (847) 
526-5000 leave message. 

ZION CLEAN, PRIVATE 
UPPER 1-bedroom, garage, 
yard, excellent location, no 
smoking, $475/month plus de- 
posit, utilities Included. (414) 
634-9387. 



WESTWIND • 
VILLAGE 

APARTMENTS 

2200 Lewis Ave., Zion 
1,2 & 3 BEDROOMS 

FREE HEAT 

Appliances • On Site 

Manager • No Pets 

Starting from 

S495/mo. 

Call Martha & tssac 

(847)746-1420 

or BEAR PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

(414)697-9616 



UkEWOod VilUqE Apartments 

In Isbwd Uke ah6 GraysUI(e 

OffrniiNCj AffoiulAblE liousiNq fort QUAlifiEcl ApplicANTS. 

NOW ACCEpTJNq AppliCAItONS foR OUR: 

• 1,2 AN(I 3 blidllOOM ApARTMENTS 

PlEASE CaII foil MORE iNfoRMAlioN OR AppoiNTMENT AT: 

(847)223*6644 TDD# (800)526*0844 

UkEwood VilUqE Aparimem is prtofEssioMAlty f£-* 
MANACjEd by MerjcKan Croup, he. japs 



OAKRIDGE VILLAGE 
APARTMENTS 



Offering Affordable Housing/or 

Qualified Applica tits. 

Currently Accepting Applications on our 

1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments 

Stop in at: 

299 Oakridge Court in Antioch 

Or call: 

847-395-4840 
f=t 1-800-526-0844 TDD 

txt.-rzr. Managed by Meridian Group, Inc. 



530 


Rooms For Rent 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



IF YOU ARE A FEMALE 
OR MALE over 21, who likes 
animals and wants to live near 
the Beach, here's your 
chance. Roommate wanted to 
share 3-bedroom house In 
Round Lake Beach. For de- 
tails call Kevin (647) 740 3896. 



538 



Business Property 
For Henl 



WAUCONDA AREA OPEN 
YARD STORAGE FOR 
RENT wilh or without office 
trailer, various sized spaces 
available. BEAUTIFUL 

1100SQ.FT., $720/month. 
Available October 1st. Call for 

prices. (847) 526-5000, 

leave . message. 



FOX LAKE PRIME LOCA- 
TION, RU2/bridgo, new of- 
fice/store, -I200sq.fi., (708) 
78B-5564 leave message. 

GRAYSLAKE - SMALL re- 
tail spaces for rent. Historic 
downtown Center St. (847) 
604-3295 . 

OFFICE SPACE FOR 
RENT IN GRAYSLAKE. 

Conveniently located In park 
like setting. 1-2 offices with 
waiting area, private bath and 
storage, Part of converted resi- 
dence, with existing law office. 
(647) 548-6637, 



Business Lot ft 
BIdg on Rt. 12 

Shop with over- 
head door, office, 
additional storage 
garage & sales lot. 
Excellent visibility. 
$795/mo. 

Land Mgmt. 
815-678-4334 



538 



Business Property 
For Rent 



For Lease 



Mew nullitlng 

(2)-IH00s([. n. 

Industrial warehouses. 

Round Like Industrial Park. 

2-t fl. celling, fenced yard. 

12 ft. overhead door. 

847-516- H 74 




(2) ,8 ACRE LOTS, 140ft. 
river frontage on Wisconsin 
River, recreational use only. 
Only 15 minutes North of the 
Dells. $18,000. (60B) 
339-9527. 

HALF ACRE LOT FOR 
SALE Private cul-de-sac, 
city sewer, well water, 2 
miles North of Antioch on 
Rt. S3. Call for Info. Must 
see. (815) 344-6885. 

LOOKING FOR A LOT? 1 
acre lot, Spring Grove, $2,000 
down, no Interest or payments 
for 18 months or will discount 
for cash. Call owner (815) 

678-4226. 

LOT AND HALF FOR SALE 
in city of Burlington, by owner. 
Asking $42,500. For more in- 
formation call (414) 
551-8843. 

VACANT LAND 

1/2 acre, 

Wauconda Schools. 

Priced to soli! 

Call Ryan & Co. 

(847) 526-0300. 




#1 CAMPGROUND MEM- 
BERSHIP AND TIMESHARE 
RESALE CLEARINGHOUSE. 
DONT WANT YOURS? 
WE'LL TAKE IT. BUYI SELLI 
RENTI RESORT SALES INTL 

1-800-423-5967. 

■ 

CAMPGROUND MEMBER- 
SHIP COAST-TO-COAST 

Travel America Resort Parks 
International (RPI), home 
park, sparkling springs, near 
Rockford, III. $800, setter will 
pay transfer fees. (414) 
694-5253. 

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH 
on the ocean but in your 
budget. Sea Spray Resort. 
1515 S. Ocean Blvd. North 
MyrtlO Beach, SC 29562. 800- 
524-8993. 



568 



Out Of Area Propertj 



NEBRASKA 

For Lease By Owner 
120,000sf bldg, 70K 

sfrctail/SOKsf 

warehouse loc 20 

mlii fr Lincoln, KE. 

Lease $2.00/ per sf. 

Coll Alan/Dale 

800-9993311 
or 

402-826-3026 



IOWA RIVER- 
FRONT HOME. 

Reduced by S30K. 

4BR on the 

Mississippi w/natural 

wood int. 80x16 float 

dock & 6 level wall 

pier. Home wrmty. 

No flood ins.. Mel 

Foster Co. Real 

Estate. Jon Yocum 

800-355-5371 



574 



Real Estate Wanted 



WANTED WAREHOUSE 
SPACE In central Lake Coun- 
ty for distribution business. 
Buy or long term lease, 5,000- 
e.OOOsq.ft, Need dock, small 
office. Like good parking, but 
not a must. Call after 6pm. 
(647) 587-5370. 

WILL BUY OR LEASE 
YOUR HOUSE. 

Any area, condition, or price. 
(647)973-1193. 



578 



Real Estate Misc. 



TIMESHARE • DELUXE 

studio located on beach In St. 
Martin. Beautiful resort with 
many amenities, asking 
54300 or best. (414) 
654-3441. 



August 13, 1999 



704 



Recreational 
Vehicles 



1882 ;:-rT. KAYOT PON- 
TOON' BOAT, Includes chairs , 
and O/B motor, $4,500. (847) . 
395-6637. i 

1995 WINNEBAGO 34FT. 

slide-out, lacks, loaded, undor 
16K, excellent condition, 
$49,000. (647) 599-7430 
days, (647) 748-3237 even- 
ings, (847) 872-0752 6pm- 
9pm. 

1997 SOFT. YELLOW- 
STONE CAPRI 5TH 
WHEEL TRAVEL TRAIL- 
ER, with slide out. All weather 
unit. Includes oak cabinets, 
washer/dryer, smooth fiber- 
glass skin and more. 
$22,500/best. (B47) 778-0226. 

1997 FLEETWOOD 39ft., 2 
silde-outs, golf cart, 10x10 
shed, full hook-ups at Crock- 
ett's Resort S5, Dolls Area, 
Reduced $21,500/best. 1-888- 
621-4711. 

1999 14FT. FLAGSTAFF 
CRANK-UP CAMPER FOR 
SALE. Has A/C, used only 
once, $7,500. Please call 
(715) 863-2900. 

1999 JAMBOREE MOTOR 
HOME 24ft.. 24K, $24,000. 
(847) 439-0568. 

FOR SALE 1992 30ft. Dutch- 
man 5th wheel trailer, A/C, 
awning, ladder, micro, $8,000. 
(847) 973-0207. 

MOTOR HOME 24FT, fiber- 
glass GMC, 2yre., TV antena, 
color TV, generalor, fully self- 
conlalned, many extras. New 
gas tank. Runs/drives like 
new. Must see to appreciate. 
319,500/consldor some trade. 
(815) 396-5298. 

MOTORKOME 1993 
COBRA MONTEREY, 30ft. 
Class A 36,000 miles, excel- 
lent condition, many extras. 
(647) 395-1952. 

MOTORHOME 1995 
PACE Arrow, 33ft., Chev 454, 
under 20K miles, fully loaded, 
sleeps 4, Includes car caddy 
and hitch, $84,500. (847) 
623-4874. 

PALOMINO TRAILER 

19FT., 1992, many options, 
excellent condition. Must see. 
Best offer. (847) 526-5377 

evenings. 

UNION GROVE 1972 Rollo- 
home 14x70 with a 12x16 ad- 
dition, 3-bedrooms, covered 
deck, 2 sheds, Includes ap- 
pliances. Asking $27,000/best. 
(414)878-2726. 



708 



Snowmoblles/ATYs 



TWO DIRT BIKES, KTM 
125 AND KTM 250. 3- place 
motorcycle trailer. Make offer. 
Will separate. Contact (847) 
740-0769 or leave message. 



710 



Boai/Moiors/Etc. 



1SFT. 65HP MERC RUN- 
ABOUT, trailer, $450. Wanted 
Jet drive parts. (£47/ 
546-6484. 

15FT. FAMILY AND SKI 
BOAT, runs great, good condi- 
tion, 60hp Johnson, trailer, 
new battery, seals and top, 
$1,600. (847)587-8047. 

18' ALUMA CRAFT, 40hp 
Merc, depth finder, & extra 
stuff, $3,900. 1985 Chevy 
pickup, box, body, for parts. 
(414)279-6841 

1972 AMF SLICKCRAFT 
23ft. cuddy, head, VHF, OMC 
I/O, cover, In water, $4,000. 
(847) 816-1250. 

1982 16FT, BASS TRACK- 
ER II wilh trailer, 40hp motor, 
some extras, $3,500. (414) 
662-2555 days, (414) 843- 
3411 evenings. 

1987 19FT. SEA RAY 
SEVILLE CUDDY, 140 I/O with 
E2 Loader Trailer, 
$3,500/oest. (847) 497-4257. 

1988 21 FT. MARATHON 

WEEKENDER, stand-up ca- 
bin, galley, V-berth, enclosed 
head, shore power with charg- 
er, trim labs, marine radio, full 
camper canvas, mooring cov- 
er, screens, and more! 4.3 
liter, OMC Cobra, new dual 
batteries, needs nothing, very 
low hours, very clean, steel 
tandem Hustler trailer, 
$9,000/besl. (847) 625-9265. 



1990 17FT. ALUMINUM 
BOAT, 70hp Evinrude, 2 live 
wells, fish finder, trolling mo- 
tor, cover, $4,000/best. (847) 
816-3061. 



710 



Boats, Motors, 
Be. 



1991 YAMAHA SUPER JET 

(stand-up), like new, under 
50hrs. with Karavan Trailer, * 
Wet suit. Must see. Must sell, 
Make offer. Waterford area 
(414) 514-2474 leave mes- 
sage. 

1993 SEA SPRITE 140hp 
MorCruiser, I/O, groat condi- 
tion, $a,000/best. (847) 395- 
7319 leave message. 

1994 PWC TIGER SHARK, 
mint condition, $1,850. (815) 
675-2251. _ 

1995 SEA DOO SP, low 
hours, many extras, 
$2,600/best. (847) 973-0381. 

1998 SEA RAY 190 BO- 
WRIDER, 5yr. warranty re- 
maining, 56hrs., like new con- 
dition. $19,900. (815) 
363-4192. 

19FT. 1982 GALAXY 170 

I/O, openbow, very clean, 
runs good, good family and ski 
boat, 53,100/bosl. (847) 
546-0262. 

19FT. LARSON CRAFT 

OPEN BOW, 150hp outboard, 
$1,500.(847)587-8651. 

20FT PONTOON, 50HP 
trim & tilt, seat covers, depth 
finder. Dual batteries and dual 
axel trailer. $7,686. (847) 
973-2072 

21 FT. 1971 CORRECT- 
CRAFT 318 V8 Inboard, 
020hrs.. in good shape, greet 
tor wakeboarding, $3,495. 
(414)767-8728. 

22FT. 1989 CABIN 

CRIUISER, Sunblrd Barletta 
229 wilh EZ Loader trailer, 
$10,500. (847) 973-9370. 

BOAT 21FT, CENTURY, 
new engine and canvas, Lake 
Michigan ready. Includes all 
fishing equipment, $5,500, 
(414) 642-3180. ]___ 

BOAT MOTOR 280 Volvo 
Slern Drive, with 302 Ford V8, 
$1,000/best (847) 356-3397. 

CABIN CRUISER 31 FT. fi- 
berglass, ftybridgs, large art- 
dock, twin V8's. reduced from 
$19,500 to $13,500 for 
1/week only. (414) 652-4865 
Kenosha. 

CATAMARAN "i4FT.- 

HOBIE Cat with trailer, $600. 

(847) 395-1760. 

CLASS A 1987 MALLARD, 
33ft. long, 63K miles, air condi- 
tioning, generator, microwave, 
$18,000.(414)886-2657. 

CLASSIC WOOD 32FT. 
1967 Chris Craft Flybridge 
Sea Skiff sport fisherman, 
good condition, $7,000/best. 
(647) 295-7976. 

FORMULA 1985 242LS, 
5.7L Merc., fully equipped, ex- 
cellent condition, 
$15,500/best. (847) 
806-9390. 

FORMULA 1993 THUN- 
DERBIHD FALCON BOAT, 
20ft. open bow, excellent con- 
dition, $12,500/best. (815) 
385-6981. 



GREAT STARTER BOAT 

1979 19ft. Open bow, 260hp 
MerCruIser I/O. Full covers 
and heavy duty double axle 
trailer, $2,600/best. (847) 
356-3810. 

HOBIE CAT SAILBOAT 

10ft. Holder Hawk, new rud- 
der, tiller, $400/best. Must sell. 
Kyle (847) 740-3226 after 
6pm. 

LUND 17-1/2FT. FISHING 
& PLEASURE BOAT, 4- 

seats, 1995, like new, EZ load- 
er, lOOhp Merc, 9.9 Merc kick- 
er, trolling motor (new), VHF 
radio, Lowrance GPS & fish lo- 
cator, 2-downrlggers (new) 
rods, 2-covers, more. 
$18,300.(414)639-0471. 

MASTERCRAFT PRO 

STAR 190, 1988. with trailer 
89,800. Best. Good condition 
ready to ski. (815) 389-3013 

OLDER 15FT. FIBER- 
GLASS BOAT with 40hp out- 
board motor and trailer, very 
good condition, $550/best. 
(414)662-2362. . 

OUTBOARD MOTOR 
45HP, $B00/best. (847)- 
546-7759. 

PONTOON BOAT 1988, 

26ft. tri-tone with 1993 Mer- 
cury 2.5 liter I.D., $5,500/best. 
(847) 963-6000. 

SAILBOAT- 18' BUC- 
CANEER Sloop, custom, 
dark green, canvas cover, tar- 
Her, $2,495. (847)526-1989 




tm 



i^ TH i ': ...- .-.. 



August 13, 1999 

i i 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspa t 




n 
tr 
5 

). 

3, 



| 



710 



'Boats, Motors, 
Etc 



SELL OUT SALE Small Pro- 
pollora, ski vests, accessories. 
(StB) 385-4729, 

SILVERUNE 1977 10FT. 
115 Evinrude, set-up for Lake 
Michigan fishing. Radio fish- 
finder, downriggers, weights 
and poles, ski and fish, ready 
for water, $3 ( 800/best. (847) 
885-3263, 

USED 1884 70HP Johnson 
Motor,' 30hrs. use, 
$2,S00/best (647) 746-3327. 



724 



Airplanes 



1946 LU8CH0MBE BA, 
65hp, with fabric wings, wood 
prop and skis. Recent paint 
and glass. Looks and files 
great. $16,500. (414) 
248-8702. 



804 



Cars Tor Sale 



CHEVY 1984 CAVALIER 
224, $500/best as Is. (847) 
546-5824 ■ • 

1984 CHRYSLER LEBAR- 

ON Convertible, loaded, blue, 
good condition, $6,000/best. 
1988 Chrysler Conquest, red, 
loaded, In good condition, 
$2,800/best Ask for Wendy 
or Ray. (847)587-4762 

1985 CAPRICE CLASSIC. 
Great condition. 1987 Delta 
'88 Oldsmobile. Child Cor* 
vetteBed. (647)740-2013. 

FORD TAURUS Wagon 
1988, V-6. All power, miles 
maintained, clean car, an 
records. $1 ,600/obo. Call 
(847) 543-0534, leave mes- 
sage 

FORD 1991 ESCORT 
WAGON, good running con- 
ditlon, $1,750. (847) 526-1911 

PLYMOUTH 1991 SUN- 

DANCEJooks/runs good, 

high miles, $1,000. (847) 
356-0041 ask for Mike. 

BUICK 1992 LESABRE 
LTD., champagne beige, 
very good condition, 118,000 
miles, $4,700. (815) 
675-9616. 

CHEVROLET 1992 COR- 
VETTE, only 17,500 miles! 
Black Rose (purple), with grey 
leather Interior, Car alarm and 
phone Included. Beautiful carl 
$20,500/best. (815) 

675-9298. 



II- ;:', 


TOYOTA 1999 CAMRY 


a, ' ..' | 


XLE V6, gray/gray leather In- 


^H 


terior, automatic, 16K, security 


r. M 


system, A/C, sunroof, am/fm 


19 p '' 


CD cassette, $25,000. (847) 


n. 


265-2178. 


Jt. I ,-. j 


APPROVE YOUR OWN 


— 


CAR LOANI 


s, M 


BUY HERE! 


■*• Ej i 


PAY HEREI 


n, 


*t-Low Down and Top 


7) .,.-"1 


Dollar For Your Trade 




*2- Low payments 


^ m ^V i 


*3- Verifiable Income/Doc. 


I- V' 


*4-Eagerness to improve 


r 1 1 iri 


credit 


' 1' i. 


•Corner of G«oes Lake Rd. & 


CI I' .' 


RL45 


*' l-y- 


(847) 548-5630. 


t% 


MILITARY WELCOME. 



804 



Cars For Sale 



AUDI 1993 90CS QUAT- 
TRO SPORT, 2.8L V8, 5- 
speed, 4WD, all power and 
luxury options, ABS, airbag, 
toather. Kelly book value over 
$16,500, sacrifice at $13,900. 
Call (847) 548-0096. 

BUICK 1987 LESABRE 

LTD, 3.8 liter engine, dean, 
$2,500/flrm. Contact (847) 
740-0769. 

BUICK 1992 LESABRE SE- 
DAN, Limited Edition, power 
everything, $7.9Q0/besL (414) 
877-4818, . 

CADILLAC 1988 EL DORA- 
DO, $3,500/beat. (847) 
731-1220. 

CADILLAC 1991 SEDAN 

DEVILLE, fully loaded, very 
nice condition, white exterior 
with tan leather Interior. Must 
sell. $3,600/best. (815) 
396-7125 anytime. 

CARS $100, $500 & up. Po- 
lice Impounds: Hondas, Toyo- 
ta, Chevys, Jeeps & Sport Utili- 
ties. Call NOW 800-772-7470 
ext.7040 

CHEVROLET 1888 BE- 

RETTA. $3,495 (847)395- 
4400. ___ 

CHEVROLET LUMINA 

1994 Euro. $5,995 (847)395- 
4400. 

CHEVROLET MONTE 

CARLO, 1975. Restored to 
showroom condition, all op- 
tions. $6500. (414)859-2424. 



CHEVY 1978 CAMARO 

228 350 V8, good condition, 
minor rust, $3,00Q/best (847) 
880-7278 leave message, 

CHEVY 1878 NOVA, no 

rust, no motor. Best offer. 
(847) 381-1885 leave mes- 
sage. 

CHEVY 1988 CELEBRITY, 
good condition, very depend- 
able, power steering and 
brakes, $l,750/bost. (847) 
473-8407 ext 81 56 bed B. 

CHEVY 1991 BERETTA, 

86,000 miles, fair condition, 
but runs great, $2,900. 1989 
Yamaha Exciter snowmobile, 
good condition, $1,000. (847) 
740-2219. 

CHEVY 1994 CAMARO, 
64,000 original miles, beautiful 
car, must sell, $a,500/best. 
(414) 654-8596. 

CHEVY 1995 CAMARO 
RS, excellent condition, well 
maintained, low miles, loaded, 
T-tops, must sell, 

$10, 2007b est. (815) 
385-5736. -_ 

CHEVY 1996 CORSICA, 
power steering, A/C, 73,000 
miles, $7,000. (414) 
862-9731. 

CHEVY 04' CORSICA 

$3.995. (847) 587-6473. 

CHEVY, FORD PICK-UP 

Bodies, Factory-new guar- 
anteed from $1300.00. Doors 
from $89.00 Fenders from 
$50.00 Beds from ssoo.oo, 
Bedllners $169.00. Bumpers, 
Grills Reparl Panels, Paints, 
Abrasives, windshields, radia- 
tors, Delivery, Marx (217) 624- 
6184. 

CHRYSLER 1988 LEBAR- 
ON, red convertible, excellent 
condition body/engine, 
$2,300. (847) 482-9430 leave 
message. 

CHRYSLER 19S9 LEBAR- 
ON CONVERTIBLE, runs 
great, very clean, must see, 
$3,700. (847) 548-0298. 

DODGE 95' INTREPID. 
$9.955 (847)587-6473. 

EL CAMINO 1966 Candy 
Apple Red, V8, automatic, 
bucket seats, power windows 
and doors, S10.000. (414) 
694-3573. 6018 69th St. 

FIREBIRD 1066 TRANS 
AM, red, T-tops, HO 30 en- 
gine, automatic, Arizona car, 
super sharp, must see and 
drive, $4,200. (847) 
358-0972. 

FOR 98* CONTOUR 

$9,995. (847)587-8473. 

FORD 1979 600 FLATBED 
with 10ln. sides, new paint, 
split rear axle, looks and runs 
good, $1,995. (647) 
546-6284. 

FORD 1988 T-BIRD, black, 
116K, CD player, sunroof, 
power windows, $1,500. (414) 
662-2568. 

FORD 1989 TAURUS LX 

WAGON, V6, all power, 
100,000 miles, well main- 
tained, 3rd. seat, $2,400. 
(847) 918-8384. 

FORD 1990 TAURUS, high 
miles, runs good, $1,800. 
(847) 623-5181. 



804 



Cars For Sale 



FORD 1991 ESCORT, au- 
tomatic, rebuilt transmission, 
new brakes, $1,600. (847) 
740-1384. 

FORD 1992 T-BIRD 
COUPE, very clean, all power, 
well maintained, $3,500/best. 
(847) 566-8468 leave mes- 
sage. 

FORD 1992 TEMPO 
AM/FM cassette, power W/L, 
A/C, new front brakes, de- 
pendable transportation, 
$3,100. (647) 548-2289. 

FORD F150XLT, 84. 

Ve/Pw/PI/ntl/cc/Air/Reg Cab. 
191047094. $10,995. (847) 
567-6473 

HONDA 89' ACCORD. 
$2,225 (847)567-6473. 

HONDA QL 600 INTER- 
STATE 1982, 8,800 miles. 
$3,500, (847)587-1710. 

ISUZU 1898 RODEO, 4- 
door, V6, 5-speed, air, cruise, 
am/fm cassette, 18,000 miles, 
$16.500. (647) 599-1895. 

JAGUAR XJS CONVERT- 
IBLE 1990, 40,260 miles, no 
winters, dealer maintained, 
beautiful condition, $16,000. 
(847)587*5274. 



LAKELAND IS OPEN 
24 HOURS; 

If you need to place an ad In 

Classified, call us at 

(847) 223-8161 ext. 140 

and leave a message. 

We will get back to you by the 

next business day. Or you can 

fax our 24-hour fax line at 

(847) 223-2691. 

MASERATI 1086 Bl- 
TURBO CONVERTIBLE, 

with leather Interior, 56K, ex- 
cellent maintained, all records, 
garaged, $9,500, (414) 
245-6881. 

MA8ERATI 1986 Bl- 
TURBO CONVERTIBLE, With 
leather Interlr, 58K, 

MERC 93* COUGAR $5,995 
(847) 587-6473 

MERCEDES 660 8L 1966, 
2-tops, storage holder, grey 
with burgundy leather Interior, 
$15,000/best. (847) 
836-5945. 

MERCURY 1995 TRACER 
. $5,995 (847)395-4400. 

MERCURY TOPAZ GS 
1989, good condition, 75,400 
miles, $2,300/bost. (815) 
675-6338. 

MITSUBISHI 1689 MI- 
RAGE, 4-door, maroon, great 
condition, $1,500/best. Call 
Veronica (647) 546-0570. 

MITSUBISHI 1995 MON- 
TERO, good condition, 

70,ooo miles, $13,500/best. 
(847) 639-^765. 

NISSAN 1997 ALTIMA Lim- 
ited Edition, $12,995 
(847)395-4400. 

OLD 63' OLDS Cutlass Su- 
preme. $6,958 (847)587- 
6473. 

OLDS 1985 TORONADO 
Extra clean, sunroof, loaded, 
good tires, garage kept, 
$2,500. (847) 356-5323 after 
4 pm. 

OLDS 1994 CUTLASS 

Ciera. S689S (647)395-4400. 

OLDS CUSTOM CRUISER 
STATION WAGON 1992, 
vista roof, towing package, 
$10,750. 1893 Brougham 
Fleetwood Cadillac, heated 
lumbar seats, $14,200. Both 
have 5.7L, 8-cylinder, climate 
control, full power, garage 
kept. Must see (847) 
587-6727. 

OLDS DELTA 88 COUPE 
1965, Descrete muscle, PS, 
PB, auto., 425cc, 2nd owner. 
Appraised $7,000, asking 
$5,600. (847) 873-8065. 

OLDS DELTA 88 COUPE 
1965, Descrete muscle, PS. 
PB. auto., 425cc, 2nd owner. 
Appraised $7,000, asking 
$5.600. (847) 973-6065. 

PLYMOUTH 1994 SUN- 
DANCE Duster . $5,995 
9847)395-4400 

PONTIAC 1983 GRAND 
PRIX, 350HO, 425 trans with 
2500 stall converter, built for 
speed, 51,500/best. (847) 
356-9135 after 5pm. 



PONTIAC 1996 SUNFIRE 
SE. $8,295 (647)395-4400. 

ROADRUNNER 1974, 318 

with 4-barrel, stlping for parts. 
(8 47) 639-1380 anytime. 

SAAB '90 9000 Turbo, Sun- 
root, garage kept. Leather. 
One owner. Excellent condi- 
tion. $5,000/best. (847) 
295-6241 



SAAB TURBO,900, 91 

Convt. Loaded 71 km lies 
$9995. (647)587-8473 

SUBMIT YOUR LAKE* 
LAND CLASSIFIED ADS 
ON THE INTERNETI Visit 
http://www.lpnews.com/ to 
place your ads conveniently. 
Ads appear on the Internal, In 
all Lakeland Papers, The 
Great Lakes Bulletin and The 
Market Journal for only $19.75 
for 15 words, then 15* each 
additional word. 

TAURUS WAGON 1993, 

clean, full power, high miles, 
asking $3,750/best. (815) 
344-1418, __ 

TEMPEST 1988, NEW In- 

terior, straight 6 OHC, $2,000. 
(647) 356-9135. 

TOYOTA 1986-1/2 SU- 
PRA, brown, very clean, 103K 
miles, manual, A/C, loaded, 
original owner, $3,800/best. 
(847) 599-0345. 



804 



Can For Sale 



VERY SPORTY 1987 T- 

BIRD, V8, good condition, 
power everything, alarm, key- 
less entry, electronic starter, 
Many new parts. $2,000/be*1. 
(647) 740-0107 after 6pm. 

VOLVO DL 1988 station 
wagon, best offer. (847) 
587-1007. . 

VW BUG 1967, excellent 
condition, must see, new tires 
and rims, runs great, $4,700. 
(647)548-7461. 

VW J ETTA GLS 1996, black, 
5-speed, 'loaded, 45,000 
miles, 5yr. full warranty, excel- 
lent condition, $12,000, (847) 
265-9570. 



810 



Classic/Antique Cars 



ANTIQUE 1948 WILLY'S 

STAKE BODY, 90% restored, 
asking $3,900. (847) 
395-2647. 

CHEVY 1972 CORVETTE, 

64,000 original miles, new 
rear spring, sialnleBS steel 
brakes, $9,500/best, (847) 
356-5044. 



PONTIAC 1940 SILVER 
STREAK, 4-door, garage kept, 
ready to be restored, 
S1.500/best. (847) 838-1982. 

VW BEETLE 1966, Baja 
Conversion, newer engine, 
runs good, needs paint, 
$1,500/best. (847) 395-9254. 



814 


Services- Parts 



8FT. CAP FOR DODGE 
RAM, sliding window, 3rd. 
brake light, locking windows, 

$300. (815) 675-9501. 

FOR PARTS 1973 BRON- 
CO, 302 automatic, 4WD, 
(S47) 497-9707. 

RIMS 100 SPOKES, 
chrome and gold McCleans, 
new rims and tires, $650/best 
Ask for John (647) 602-6195 
paqer. (414) 697-4367. 



824 


Vans 



828 



Four Wheel Drive 
Jeeps 



BRONCO II, EDDIE BAU- 
ER, 1987, loaded, $2,500/firm. 
Call (847) 740-0769 or leave 

message. 

CHEVY 1995 S-10 BLAZ- 
ER, red with tan interior, 
power locks/windows, 4-door, 
A/C, $15,50Q/best. (847) 
546-2066 5pm-9pm. 

FORD 1091 EXPLORER 

XLT 4x4, 4-door, original own- 
er, tow package, sunroof, lug- 
gage rack, tilt, cruise, power 
everything, air, some rust, well 
maintained, 142K miles, new 
exhaust, newer brakes and 
tires, $4,500. (815) 728-1994. 

FORD 1092 F-1SO short- 
box 4WD, black, XLT, full pow- 
er, 351 V8, automatic, Ton- 
neau cover, excellent condi- 
tion, $9,000. (847) 546-8131 
leave message. 

FORD 1093 EXPLORER 

4x4, full power, new 
brakes/tires, sunroof, 10 track 
CD, $10,995/best. (847) 
695-7606. 

GMC 1067 SUBURBAN 

new transmission and battery, 
newer brakes, $3,400/best. 
(647) 438-5724. 




JEEP 1997 CHEROKEE 
SPORT, white/gray. Solec- 
Trac 4x4, air, full power, clean, 
like new, $14,900. (414) 
694-8582 evenings. __ 

SUBURBAN 1988 RE- 
CENT tune-up, new exhaust, 
brakes and tires, $2,000, ex- 
cellent work vehicle. (847) 

344-52b,'. 



CHEVY 1996 LUMINA, 7- 
passenger mini van, power 
steering/brakes; fronrand rear 
air, cassette player, under 
warranty, excellent' condition, 
with low miles, $14,500/best. 
(647) 548-1328. 

DODGE 1996 CARAVAN 
SE, 48,000 miles, brand new 
tires, 2 sliding doors, air, 
$14,800/best. (647) 
356-5044. 

DODGE 1096 CARAVAN, 
7-passenger, keyless entry, 
A/C, AT, CO, excellent condi- 
tion, $15,000. (847) 
776-0032. , 

FORD 1696 E-250 CARGO 
VAN, heavy duty, excellent 
condition, tow package, trailer 
hitch, 43K miles, air, $15,200. 
(615) 923-2798. 

PLYMOUTH 1993 VOYAG- 
ER, A/C, cruise, 122K high- 
way miles, runs great, very 
clean, $4,500. (847) 
546-5067. 

PLYMOUTH 02' VOYAG- 
ER $2,850 {847)587-6473 



834 


Trucks/Trailers 



GMC SONOMA SLE 1994, 
club cab, 4.3L, all options, 
76,000 miles, complete serv- 
ice records, outstanding condi- 
tion, $10,500. (847) 
395-0418. 

30FT. TOW BEHIND, 
sleeps 6, full bath, new heat, 
A/C, lots of storage, full size 
refrigerator, microwave. A 
MUST SEE at $2,950, (847) 
836-5144. 

CHEVY 1987 3/4 TON 2WD 
350, unbelievable buy, au- 
tomatic, excellent condition, 
$4,500 with cap and rack. 
(647) 662-6202. 

CHEVY 94' S10 Piu $6915 
(847 567-6473 

DODGE 1995 RAM LARA- 
MIE SLT, eft. bed with hard 
cover, running board, loaded. 
$13,000/best. (815) 
653-7212. 

F600 CAB & CHASSIS 1982, 
477 engine, S1,300/best. 
(847) 356-9135 after 5pm. 

FORD 1993 RANGER XLT. 
$7,495 (647)395-4400. 

FORD 1998 RANGER, red, 
30,000 miles, A/C, stepslde, 
extended warranty, asking 
$11,400. (815) 759-9187. 

GMC MOVING VAN 1982, 
18ft. box, aluminum loading 
ramp, $1,600. (847) 
362-3022. 

NISSAN 1986 PICK-UP 
4x4, 5-speed, power steer- 
ing/brakes, sunroof, high sus- 
pension lift, 108K, 
S1,BO0/best. (647) 356-3315. 

SILVERADO 1987 

LONGBEO PICK-UP, Hunt- 
er's Delight, body fair to good 
condition, drive train excellent 
condition, 137,000 miles. Ask- 
ing $2,200(847)356-1982. 




DAVIS TASK FORCE 
TRACK TRENCHER Com- 
pletely rebuilt to new like con- 
dition, Inclg. new motor. Digs 
5ft. deep, 4ln-8in wide trench. 
$8,000/besL (847) 356-3483. 




S24 



Education/ 
Instruction' 



S42 



Landscaping 



J 

3 

c 
o 






i 

5 

^ 
ft 

C 



£ Cahrary Christian 
Lea ml no. Center 
Preparing Children 
Spiritually & 
Academically for the 
future. 

• Christ Centered 
Curriculum 

r j •Nurturing Staff 
y • Fun & Friendly 
Atmosphere 

• Daycare &preschoo! 
for ages 3-5yrs. 

• Open 6:30AM-6PM 
Mon.-Fri. 

> Kindergarten readiness 
Mk Tor children entering 
r Kindergarten in the 

a Fall of '99 

3 Now accepting 

ik applications for Fall i 

/s l3Ulona\1llcRd. * 

» LakcVUJa £ 

5 Ph: 847-265-0580 5 

6 Fjc 847-356-6524 m 



# 

3 

C 

* 

J 

1 

3 



S. HERNANDEZ 

LANDSCAPING 

* No Job Too Small 

•Quality Workmanship 

•Mewing 

•Tree Trimming 

•Flower Beds 

•Tree Planting. 

•Free Estimates 

•Fully Insured. 

S livedo Hernandez 

Round Lake Park, III. 

(847) 546-1617 or 721-4817. 



S72 



Professional 
Services 



1095 H.D. SPORTSTER 
1200, Serious Inquiries only. 
$8,200. (847) 997-1466. 

BEAUTIFUL BIKE 1897 Ya- 
maha Virago, 2,000 miles, like 
new, $5,700/best. (847) 
419-6890. 

HARLEY 1992 FLHTCU 
Ultra Classic, 2-tone blue, ex- 
cellent. $15,000, (414) 
859-3042. < 

HARLEY DAVIDSON RED 
1984 FLHTC. completely re- 
built in 1997, excellent condi- 
tion. $11,000/best. (815)- 
344-4273. 

HARLEY DAVIDSON 

SPORTSTER 883, excellent 
condition, $2,000 In extras, 
$5,00Q/besL (414) 654-4302. 

HD FXR REPLICA 1998, 
custom built from ground up. 
S&S Ness. Must sell, $22,000. 
(414) 878-3182 call after- 
noons^^ 

HONDA 1087 VFR 750, 
$7 l O00/besL Must sell. Please 
call (647)543-8606 

MOTORCYCLE 1088 

HONDA SHADOW, ACE, 
windshield, leather saddle 
bags, 6,000 miles, excellent 
condition, $5,500. (847) 
526-4089. ___ 

MOTORCYCLE 1088 

ZX8R, low miles, excellent 
condition, new tires, green 
windshield. Must sell. 
$8,200/best (815) 385-5736. 

MOTORCYCLE Suzuki 
QS1100 OSQ, 18M origi- 
nal miles, like new, fair- 
ing, radio tape, bags and 
•hop manual, $1,800, 
(414) 877-2324, (414) 
630-3166. 

SUZUKI 1090 KATANA 

1100CC, fast, clean, sharp. 
$3,200/best Call John (847) 
625-0172 after 5pm. 




THE HANDYMAN NO Job 

too small. Painting, carpentry 
and repair work. Reasonable 
rates and tree estimates. 
(647) 223-7724. 



CONTRACTORS 

EQUIPMENT REPAIRS. 

Gas or Diesel. 

Small or Large, 

30yrs. Experience. 

Fast Service. 
Competitive prices. 

Will pick up. 

All work guaranteed. 

Call Great Lakes Maintenance 

(847)587-1291; 

NEED A CHAUFFEUR? 
Hourly, dairy, weekly. Your car 
or mine. Call (815) 459-1504 

8am-5pm. 



1 



S78 



Remodeling 



S39 


Housekeeping 



DEBBIE'S CLEANING 

SERVICE! 

18 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

Will do Your Spring 

Cleaning, Move-outs, 

New & Old Construction. 

Reasonable Rates. 

References available. 

(847) 973-0913. 

HOUSE CLEANING avail- 
able. Insured and bonded. 
Honest and reliable. Please 
call (847) 740-0306. 

PROFESSIONAL HOUSE 

CLEANER. Dependable, ex- 
perienced. Excellent referenc- 
es. Most houses $60. (847) 
662-5077. 



CONTRACTOR WILL DO 

replacement windows, doors, 
siding and remodeling, also 
light Bobcat work. Call John 
(847) 746-2615. 

DC TILE WE We Instsall ce- 
ramic, vinyl tile, Parquet, and 
Pergo floors. For free esti- 
mates call (847) 395-0777, 
paoer (706) 9888504. 




AUCTION SEPTEMBER 

18TH, 9AM. NO MINIMUM 
STARTING BIDS. 5% AUC- 
TION FEE. Mega Discount 
Nursery, 1901 E. Rawson, Mil- 
waukee, Wise. (414) 
571-6565. 





Lakeland Newspapers 




Lakeland Classifieds 



11 N 



W: 



Buy, Sell, Trade 
Medical Equip/Supplies 

Employment 

Autos & Transportation 

Real Estate 

Pets & Supplies 

Announcements 

mm sQ&wm air ailils 



Lakeland Newspapers 



Phone: (847) 223-8161 

Fax: (847) 223-8810 

E-mail: classified @ lpnews.com 







-j ' rrv 



,: 






IS 



C1B /Lakeland Newspapers 



CLASSIFIED 



August 13, 1999 




#/ A % $> 



ft ' 



{no 

| Bob Pclcncn, Owntr, Operator 
| Kcm.il L. Slietlel PGA GP 

I 491 S. Html Club Rtl., Gurnee, IL 60031 
I 



COUPONI 



mffl 
ail 



847-549-609O«691 IBlBCelfcBttS 



• Beautiful and Challenging par 35, 9-holo layout. 

• Comprehensive 5-week Junior Golf Program begins 
June 21 si. Hurry, space Is limited. 

■ All weekend tee times available 7 days In advance. 

• PGA Professional available tor group golf lessons. 



2 for $32 

• 2 Nino-hole 

rounds 
(1 per person) 

• 2-porson cloctric 
cart 

Valid Monday 

through Friday. 
Not valid for league 

or outing play. 

Exp. 8/31/99 



MAKE US YOUR HOME COURSE IN '99 
(847) 367-6010 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
L 



Orchard Hills 

Golf Course 

38342 N. Green Bay Rd. 

Waukcgan, IL60087 

(847)336-5118 





$25 

per person 

Includes 

riding cart! 



I 



(Based on 2 per- cart.) 

OrTcr valid: Weekdays 7am-3pm 

Weekends & Holidays After 1:00 pm I 

Call for reservations. | 

Visit our other IVaukegan | 

Park District Courses; 

Bonnie Brook & Greenshire | 



SH1LOH PARK 

GOLF COURSE 

23rd St. & Bethesda Blvd., Zion 

9-HOLE 

Open to the Public 

Dawn to Dusk 




746-5502 



On of Chkogoimmft lop 50 Cows** 




Enjoy A Day Out At Our links. 



rm 



C ll .111 1 (IILJI 

Golf Outing* 

O.lnqiift Fjtilitl.'l 

f ttll*5iM-vicc Golf 5h<ip 



Gulf Lettom Available 
Lunch Served Daily 
Friday Night Dinncri 
Gr.ni Tr<- Prartif «' R-ini'i' 



Tee Tims) Reservations up to Thro* Days In Advance) 

2800 K. L*wi« Awmw • Wat-kaftan, Illinois 
(847) 360-4730 

WAUKEGAN !B\RK DISTRICT 

www.waukeganparks.ore 



GOLF 

The following courses are listed in the 

Lakeland/ Market Journal Golf Guide. 

For more information, contact courses directly. 

Antioch Golf Club 
Anlloch, IL 

Contact: Sieve .(847) 395*3004 

Bobby's Golf Center & Driving Range 
Gurnee, IL 

Contact: totity (847)549*6090/6091 

Bonnie Brook Golf Course 
Waukcgan, IL 

CbiiAirtMaiv :'... (847)360-4730 

Greenshire Golf Course 
Beach Park, IL 

Contact: dm (847)360-4777 

Headier Ridge Golf Course 
Gumcc, IL 

Ctmtad:Tlm .,.••' (847)395-6010 

Nippersink Country Club 
Genoa, Wl 

Contact:]^. .....(414)279*5281 

Orchard Hills Golf Course 
Waukegan, IL 

Contact: Kathy (847)336-5118 

Rhinelander Area Golf Courses 
Rhine!ander t Wl 

Contact: Chamber of Commerce (800) 236-4RJN 

Shiloh Park Golf Course 
Zion, IL 

Contact: Rich Walker (847) 746-5502 

Vernon Hills Golf Course 

Vernon Mills, IL 

Contact; Ron O'Brien (847)680-9310 



*F vaud ^tf 

*Jr 7 DAYS A WEEK ^ 
*eT? (Weekends after 10:00am) 

O Call For Availability Of 
n Tee Times Or For More o 
information q 

°o°° ° o o o 

o ° n ° °' 

o o 



JL 

2 — U*aiocH o.cL — i 



Route 59 & 

Grass Lake Road 

Antioch, IL 



(847) 395-3004 




reenshire 

B O L F COURSE 
*r j"~ 9-Holc Comr»«a P ? 

9 Hole. SSS^S^SSS $650 

Extra Round.. .....$375 

Juniors (17 yi\iir> nnd youngiT). , $1.00 

kknLiy-FiUjjr Wore run 

Seniors (£6 years and older)... .$4.00 

Montiy CtVIjy trfcer rron 

VVecfcend/HrdkLry Green Fee* 

9 Holes T. .5750 

Extra Round 5400 

(847)360-4777 
38727 N. Lewis Ave. • Beach Parle, Illinois 

WAUKEGAN FaRK DISTRICT 

www.waukcganparks.org 



Play Bettor Golf with JACK NICKLAUS 






E QUPE TO 

GOMPUETEj 
VOVKk GRIP 

CORRECTLY 

CrCHINp THE OftU.,, 
NOT UKWIWG about 

PPStTtOM YOUP. LEFT 
HAND FIRST. THEN AOD 
YOUR. RIGHT MdW0_&CWTLy 



CLUI 



j[GE YOUR. PE SIRED 

^face alignment. 



MFORE SCCUP.IMC 
THC CUJfc IN "TMC; 



-=rWQCJ»,fe op vour-v 
atGMT HAND... t>C 
1URE. TMdrTlT* 

IS BLUiWtD "W 

■c pifuccnoH 



h,i*»^ r 
SURE 



TMfc &ACVC OF 
UEFT HflNa 



VOUP. 



VCKJR. HANDS LUILL. 
UJWT TO «=tGWT 
•ACM OTHER 
DURING THE. SWING. 





Painting5|^l papering 
Expert Installalion 



* 




95-8428 ! 



Mulch & Top Soil 

Free Delivery 

Shredded rtertrwMd S2S cm. yd. 

Stoddcd W*od C*4*r-.-.-$3S c«. yd. 
Cy-tntta ISO ctt. yd. 



Red C*dw..~. 



.S41 en. yd. 



Cedar CMpf .535 en. yd. 

Ai-i T-ftf, Gartom Hlx, Mm hntm 

C if mt . trad, Sm-d, S«d, tie. 

Credit Cwfto Accepted 

SURE GREEN 
C~c2^> 847-888-9999 




DON'T THROW AWAY 
THAT OLD LAMP, 
BRING IT TO OUR 
LAMP DOCTORS 
FOR REPAIRS. 

WARREN ELECTRIC INC. 

33261 N. HIGHWAY 45 

WILDWOOD, IL 60030 

(847)223-8691 




INSTALLATIONS- INC. 

* Custom Remodeling . 
• Basements 'Kitchens 
• Baths • Stairs 

• Railings • Decks 

• Aluminum Vinyl 
& Wood Siding 

No Job Too Big or Small 

Free Estimates 

847-356-1602 



— uH ii h ii m ii h i 



HUM 



-TTTTTmiTlTr 111-1)111 ■I-MII 



BW-TM 



K- Tt 





August 13, 1999 



CLASSIFIED 



Lakeland Newspapers/ C 




I 




Newspapers is your 




Fine Lakeland Area Businesses & Services 



To Place 
Your Ad Here 
Call 

847-223-816 



■im 







AFFORDABLE HOME 
— SERVICES INC — 



Over 34: years of Quality Service 



EXTERIOR 

Exterior Painting • Carpentry 
• Alum. & Vinyl Siding 
• Fascia & Soffit 
Vinyl Replacement Windows 
• Roofing-New & Repairs 



INTERIOR 

• Interior Painting 

• Drywalling & Repairs 

• Ceramic Tile • Insulations 

• All Types of Floor Coverings 

Carpeting 



■ mmmm 



Call For A Free Estimate 
(847)356-9282 



-fl 



WWM*»WWW*MAW^i M **j 



WJ?fT,-V.lJK 



" A Growing Reputation for 
Quality." 

f HOLESALE * RELML * RESIDENTIAL * COMMERCIAL 
i & Shrubs * Evergreens * Perennials 

■ 

1 1075 W Wadsworth RcL 
Beach Park, EL 60099 
847-662-1800 
FAX 847-662-1823 



zffpring trial Tffptunq 

Spring cleaning Is a chore.... 
Let us tidy up for youl 

We offer cleaning: 
•Weekly •Bf-Weekly •Monthly 
•Special Occasions & Relocations 
Very Reasonable Rates - Licensed, insured, & Bonded 
FREE Estimates A * References Available 

PRO-MAIDS 

Professional Cleaning Service 

(847)514-6855 




Residential and " 
Small Commercial 



T. LAZZARETTO & 
SON CONSTRUCTION 



• Interler Trim * 
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• Window Eesrteceoeeiit 

QuAimr W(wk 

Cuaaaktkxd!!! 

Cmll 

C847)987*a8S2 

Ask for Tony • . rally la>ur*d 





HOME REPAIRS 



HANDYMAN SERVICE 



Save money by using Ame rlca's 

largest handyman service. 

Insured, bonded, guaranteed. 

(847) 726-1 061 




OFFICE IN 30 STATES 



Direct 







THEIST0DIO sm 

Web Site Production & Internet Marketing 

847-395-9115 

Having a Web site is all about perception and marketing; 
forget all the hype! You need to partner with an experienced 
company that has a company that has a proven track record 
of satisfied clients. A company that mentors you for the 
future with this evolving technology. 

The Istudio" 11 .established in 1995 and located in downtown 
Antioch, caters to business new to the Internet. Each client's 
program is tailored to his or her specific knowledge and 
exposure levels with the Internet. Don't risk your businesses 
credibility online! 

If, you currently have an ineffective Web site or are 
thinking of putting your business online, do it right the first 
time - visit The Istudio Web site at : 
www.tha istudio.com. M , R 

9:00-5:30 



SMITH 

PAINT • STAIN • WATERSEAL 



Houses • Garages • Decks 

Interiors Exteriors 

Sfongtag • Rig Rolling • Feathering 



WOOD RESTORATION 

Strip. Snnd Slain & Varnish 

your wood to look beautiful 

again. 

847-244-2202 



r Aerial Work 
^Services Co* 

>f Expert Tret and Slump 

s^ Removal 

< Free Eitlmatts 

V. fully Insured • 

%> Pruning • 

7\ ■ Bush Removal 

& UtCJearing 

Reasonable Rales 



r> Rtasonaoic Rates 
& (847) 662-5301 




wJ>A& 




CONTRACTORS ELECTRIC SERVICE, INC> 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
"Call Us For Fast Courteous Service' 

RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL 

33265 N. Rte. 45 
Wlldwood, IL . 60030 

(847) 223-4682, 



4 



Visit us on the web. 



WWW.LPNEWS.COM 





PROFESSIONAL 
HOUSE PAINTING 

Interior «\ Exterior 

FREE Estimates 

Call 
Hans Killrtg 

847-837-9153 




fi. 



Jerry Shaver 

TRK.&EXC. 

and 
Landscaping 

" / Demolition \ 
C Clean up > 
\ Hauling / 

815-3854959 



*&» 





North Shore 
Water 

*Softftftlng 
*$«JtDcA¥«fy 

Salt Deiiwrv Spatial 

tVSOhlmcilNSaft 
***l*Mi*fti$4ia* ** 

Call 625-8016 Tetiay 



Web Sites ?.E-$t ores 

-okt: County's Qfilu 0<-e Stop 

Wen, Shop Since "TVS' 



«¥7-395-9115 



391 take Street Downtown Antiocb 



Ml 
CONSTRUCTION 

• General Coo trectlng 
; 'Interior Trim 

• Additions • 



FlnUhlsg 
Decks/Screen Porches 
■ Window RtplscsssMat 

Qvairt Work 

Guaranteed!!! 

Coll 

14 CB47>987-2652 

A_s\t for Tony * Folly Incur** 








N RECYCLE ^J 

CASH For Alum. Cans 
Copper-Brass 
Insulated Wire 



Chicago Surplus 

t l304-260th Ave 
Trevor, Wise. 



One Mile West of 83 &C 
Turn North on 259th 



Mon-Fri 9-5pm 

Sat9-3 

Closed 12-1 Lunch 



^ 414-862-2517 r^ 



Lakeland NeiPspapers 
Antique TDtrectorv 

is the place where you 
can discover places to 
find hidden treasures. 



dm^kCheck it out in 
"i'^™£he Classifieds, 
| the first week 
' of each month. . 



DECKS PLUS 

•CONSTRUCTION 
• GENERAL CARPENTRY 




.•Porches ■Room Additions 
■Basement Remodeling 
•Bathrooms • Kitchens 
•Custom Carpentry 
■ Improvements & Repairs! 
ptnuaxj" 



(414) 

FViit Call Gary KoUuiu 



AU-AMERICAN 

■ Painting * Staining 
Custom Remodeling 

SUMMER SALE 

FREE Estimates 

10% off with this ad 

847-548-5110 



Lie Bond. 



20 yr*. 1 
."Exp. 



Xflfe OnCittel 

www.take onllne.com 
15,000 + visitors Per Month I 




www.thet5tudio.cocD 


MUM 


The Iatodlo" 

We Cater to Business 
New to the Internet 


s bm 


Included with Every Site We Produce: 

- Internet Marketing Tralnlng- 
- Monthly WWW Meriting Newtfertor- 

Pree Hot Unk In 
Lake Onllne'e Market Place 




<***-«*.«_»* ' *•> /*^* ***** «V4<f *!■*•••. U*. f*-**** ■*■-»..•.-* - *~ • **•%■ 



20 / Lakeland Newspapers 



~u~ 



--■ y ' ** *— ■ 



" 



COMMUNITY 



/iugusf 13, 1999 




LEGEND IS COMING! 




Qurnee 



PHASE I PHASE II 








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• NET PULSE WITH WEB ACCESS 

• PRECOR EFX 

• STAIRMASTER STEPMILL 



• HAMMER STRENGTH 
•FLEX 

• BODYMASTER 

• ICARIAN 
• CYBEX 
•TONS OF FREE WEIGHTS 

• AND MORE 
"SPECIAL AMENITIES ARE OPTIONAL 

AT AN EXTRA COST 



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Special Intrdductdry Offer 



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Call Ndw and Save!! 




Preview Hours at the 
Gumee Holiday Inn 

Mon-Fri: 
8 A.M. to 9 P,M. 

q a m ttV p m Temporary Preview Center 
Sun Located in the Holiday Inn, 

10 A.M. to 6 P.M. Gurnee 



Charge Cards 

and Checks 

Accepted 



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Franchisees of Gold's Gym 
Franchising, Inc. 





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